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Surgeon General's
Office
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COMMENDATION
o
t
INOCULATION,
ACCORDING
TO
Baron
DIMSDALE's
METHOD,
Py
JOHN
MORGAN,
MD, FRS,
&c.
DIRECTOR-GENERAL
of the
Hospitals,
and
Physician
in
Chief
of the
A MER
ICAN
AR
M
Y,
Wow
BOSTON
Pointed
jt
J.
G
I
L
L,
in
Qveen-Stree?;
M tCC
IXXVI.
ADVERTISEMEN
T.
/IS if
is net
unlikely
the
Small-Pox
may
/pread
^
in
this Country,
it has been
thought
that
the
_
re-
publication /Dimfdale'i
method
of
inoculation
might
be
very
feafonable
at
this time,
and
not
lefs
ufeful.
In
cafe
the
praclice
of
inoculation
jhould
hereafter
be
permitted,
the writer
of
the following
pages
was
requefled
to
favour
the editor with
a
recommendatory
preface,
to
which
he readily
confented,
not
doubting
ifs
being received
with
candor
;
as a
defire
of
being
<hviceable
to
the community, was
the
motive
for
com-
plying
with that requejl.
Being
written
in
hajle,
and
amidfi
a
hurry
of
bufinefs-,
the
indulgent
reader
will,
it
is
prefumed,
kindly
overlook
any
inaccuracies
that
have
arifenfrom
his
not having
had
it
in his
oower
to
devote but
a
few
hours
t&
this
ot
ivreeabl?
tafk.
RECOMMENDATORY
PREFACE.
I
y&^XK^ygT
is
the
opinion
of
fbme
very obfer-
X
# *
X
va
nt
men
that
there
are
few
perfons
I
"•
k
but
what
have
the
Small-
Pox
at
X #
..
* X
Tome
period
of
their lives.
Accor-
^xxxxx^
ding
to
them,
at
leaft
a fourteenth
part
of
all
that
are
born
into
the world,
die
of
it,
Of
thofe
who
get
it
in
the
natural way,
on
the
moft
moderate
eftimation,
if
we can truft
to the
reflections
of
Monfieur
Gatti,
(to whom the world
is
indebted
for
his
many
other
ufeful
remarks
on
the
fubjecl:
;)
the
proportion
that
die,
to
thole
that
recover,
is as
one to
ten.
*'
Certain
it is that
a
great
number
of
the
human
race
are fwept
awav
by
its
fatal
influence
;
for ever
fince it
has
made
its
firft
appearance
in
the
known
parts
of
.the
world,
it
has
marked
its
courfe, by
the
terror,
A 2
death
D'apie;
!*l
CaJenl* \tt
plus
rm^eres
la
q'istorz'eme
par;ie
des
liomrruM
naiff*nt
meuient
de
la
petin,
verole,
& fur
ceux
qui
foot
att*qoei
de
cetta
cruclie
mahdie,
le
nrmbfe
de
cct;x
qui ea
in
ueni,
ett au
rombie o'e
ccux
qui
en
tecftappent,
i'tion
qo-lques
edivaint,
romrne un
a
dix
;
felon
d'.uitits,
com
1'.-
'Jd
a frpt-j
ft er.tfn
d*
aup-es qnclqnes
tablet,
rt
en
oiniculi^f,
''
ap e
;
cell?!
que
i' HoiVital
tie
i'
tnodula^
ti
>n
liOn&ut
i
'!-:
!
ile
fjurnir,
comma
un
a
quatre
Guv,
r\i-
Piejuge"
qui
f\,ppnf:nt au
prcgies
et
a le.
Sti.n de
1'^nccul
ti
o.
p.
8S
(
4
)
death and
devastation
that have attended
its
psc-
grefs
;
and
has
taken off
mqre of
the human
race
than
war
itfelf.
Next
to
luxury,
ambition
and
the
pride of kings,
this
appears to
be
the
fevereft
fcourge that
ever
afflicted
the
unhap-
py
race of man.
Villages, towns and
cities
have
been
frequently
laid
wafle
by
it
;
and
entire,
communities
thinned
of their inhabitants.
As there is no
difeafe fo
univerfal,
and
at the
fame time fo mortal,
there
is
none which has
afforded more exercife
to
the fancy
of fpeculativq
men
;
none concerning
which they have
enter-
tain'd
a greater variety of
opinions,
or
more falfe
and
deftructive errors than this.
Milled
by vain
and
imaginary hypothecs,
they
have
often
ren-
der'd
this
difeafe, fo noxious
in
itfelf,
ftill
more
fatal.
By the
heating method
they
employed in
the
management of it,
they
added fuel to the
flame,
and
armed
the
difeafe with
a
tenfold vio-
lence.
Long
did this
mifchievous
treatment
pre-
vail,
till
our
celebrated countryman
arofe,
who
may
be
defervedly
filled
the
Britifh
Hippocrates
;
I
mean
Sydenham
of immortal
name. At
the
head
of thofe
few who
chofe nature
for
their
guide,
he oppofed the ruinous
torrent.
Bleffed
with
an uncommon
elevation
of
genius
and
folid
judgment,
by
a
ftricr.
attention
to facts
and ufeful
obfervations,
he laid the foundation
of
a
better
and
more
fuccefsful
practice.
1 o
him
we
are
chiefly
beholden
for
the
introduction
of
a
coo!
regimen
in
the treatment
of the
fm
all-pox
;
and
tho' it
did
not
immediately
and
extenlively
pie-
vail,
(fo
great is
the
power
of
even
the
mofc fatal
habits,
rooted
prejudices
and
the
authority
of
great names
;)
yet
in
alter
timcs.whcn
the force
of them
were
difpelled, the
minds
of men
being
cleared from
the miff,
which
atfirft obfcui
ed
them,
became
open
to conviction,
and,
at
this day, from
the
difference of
treatment,
few
traces are left
.of
the
former mortal
effects
of the
difeafe.
Un-
fpeakable are
our
obligations,
therefore,
to
this
great
man,
whole
hiitory
and
exact
deiciiptiou
of
the
fymptoms
of
the
natural
fmall-pox
with
his
method
of
cure,
being
founded
on
the im-
mutable
laws
of
nature,
will
endure thro'
the
lapfe
of time,
bid defiance
to the
cavils
of
icepti-
cifm,
and
mock the
weak
attemrt; of
impotent
critics to injure
or
overturn
it. The
renowned
Boerhaave,
venerable
for
his
great
erudition
and
profound
knowledge
of
the
healing
arts, after
a
laborious
perufal
or
every
thing
written, in hi,
time,
on
the
fubject,
declares
"
there
is
nothing
"
to be
added
to
what
Sydenham
has
delivered
f
6
on
the natural
fmall-pox."
Notwithftanding
all
the
advantages
which
we
derive from
the
greater!
Ikill
in
its treatment,
it,
ncverthelefs,
is
at
all
times,
one
of
the molt
dan-
gerous
difeafes
that
infetts
the
body,
when takeia
in
the natural
way. In
the
various
expedients
that
have
been
deviled
to
mitigate
the feverity
of morbid
affections,
and
to
render
thole
which
are
dangerous,
mild
and
innocent,
no invention,
fiarely,
(
if
it may be
called an
inven
i
m
c
rather
the
j^fpiiadon
of
Heaven
itlcif
in
pity to
(
6
)
man
)
no
attempt
to
difarm
a
fatal
difeafc of
its
violence,
was
ever fo
fuccefsful, or
ever
equal in
its
importance, to
that
of
inoculation
properly-
managed.
When
we
confider,
therefore,
the
direful ef-
fects
which commonly
attend
the
natural
fmall-
pox,
compared
with
the
mildnefs
of
its
fymptoms,
and the
little danger
that
accompanies
the
fame
difordcr
by
inoculation,
we
are
not
furprized
that
the
practice of this
art,
in
fpight
of
every
contri-
vance
that has been
employed
to
difcredit it,
at
different
times,
by
a
variety
of
interefted
men,
mould
triumph
at
length
over
all
oppofition
and
over the
fears and
prejudices
of
weak
minded
perfons,
and
at
this day
be
fo
extenfively
exerci-
fed.
Wehave room
rather to
wonder
that it
is
not
univerfal, or that
there
is
a
fingle
perfon
to
be met with, who
can
think of
oppofing, or
neg-
lecting
to
call
in its aid
to
himfelf and
family,
when
the
diforder
appears,
and
whilfl
the
means
of inoculation are
within his
power.
It is
fpeaking
with the
greateil caution,
fimply
to
affirm,
"
that
the [mall pox
by inoculation,
is
al-
ways
much lighter
than the
natural
;
that it
is a
far
lejs dangerous
diforder,
and
is
generally
benign
when-
ever
thefubjecl
is
ivell
chosen"
So
great, too,
are
the improvements
that have
been made of late
years
in the
practice
of
inoculation; the
prepara-
tion of
the fubject, and treatment of the difeaie,
that it is rare for a patient to
be conlin'd
one
day
by
it,
and we feldom
meet
with
any of thole
troublefome
(
7
)
troublcfome
fymptoms
that
ufed
fometimes
to
cnfue
in
the
neighbourhood
of the
incifion,
for
want
of
a better
method
of
performing
the
ope-
ration,
owing
to
a
groundlefs
appreheniion
whiclr
prevailed,
that
in
any
other
way,
the
diibrder
would
not
take.
There
are
but few
now
con-
versant
in the
practice,
who
will
allow
that
thofc
who
die
from
inoculation
exceed
one
in
a thou-
fand
of
thofe
who
take
the
fmall
pox
that
way
;
and
we
hear
of
fome
who
have
inoculated
feve-
ral
thoufands,
fuccefsfully,
without
a finglemif-
carriage.
Can
there
be
a
ftronger
argument
than
this,
in favour
of
the
operation,
efpecially
when
we
further
add,
that
wherever
it
has
been
praCti-
fed,
even
by the
moft
illiterate
perrons,
it has
al-
ways
been
attended
with
remarkable
fuccefs
?
Not
to
take
up too
much time
on
a fubjeel:
that
has
given
employment
to fo
many
able
pens,
I
fhall
iatisfy
myfelf,
for
the
prefent,
in
juft
point-
ing
at
a few
of the
advantages
arifing from
this-
practice.
And
thole
fuch
as are
obvious
to every
one
who
will
allow
himfelf
to
reflect ever
fo
lit-
tle
upon
its-
falutary
effedts.
In
the firft
place
then,
it is
highly
beneficial
to
the
patient,,
that
he has
it in
his
power
to
receive
the
difeafe
from
a
healthy
fubjeer,
in
its
mildeft
ft
ate, and in
the
fafeft manner,
arid
in
the
abfence
of every other
difeafe.
The
choice
of
the
patient's
age,
or the
temperature
of
the air,
feafon
of
the year, ft
ate
of
the
blood,
and general
habit
of
the body,
"
freefern
gouty,
rheumatic,
fcorbutic,
inftammati.
v&
orfeverijh
difpofttions
of
every
kind"
ab
well as
ever-v
(
3
)
evety
acute
or
critical difeafe
with
their
effects
j'
which
render
thofe
who
labour
under
them
more
unfit fobjecls of
inoculation,arenoneof
the
moit
in-
considerable
benefits which
may
be
derived from
the
taking
the
difeafe in
this
way.
Yetthofe
are
not
all
;
there
is fome
advantage
in
a
fuitable
preparation
of
the perfon
to
receive
the
fmall-
pox,
from
procuring
the
circumftances
neceflary
for having
it
with
the
lead
poflible
inconveniency
or
danger.
I
would net
here
be
underftood
to
mean
that
every
perfon to be inoculated,
ought
to
go
thro*
a courfe
of
medicine
;
or
that
any
particular
rule
can
be
laid
down
that
will
apply
precifely to
every
cafe. Whilft
"thofe who
are
in
highhealth
or of a
"
plethoric
habit
of
body,
require
tobereducedto
"
a
more
fecure ftate
;
thofe
who
arc weak
and
ti
low
to
be
recruited, and
thofe who
abound
"
with
crudities,
or
iharp humours,
to have
"
them corrected
or expelled"
;
fo there are
fome
perfons who
need no preparation
whatever;
and
in whom no
change can
be
made
in their
conftitution, whether
by
diet or medicine, that
will
not, by
removing
it
from
that
exact medium
of
difpofition, in
which
the
moft
perfect ftate
of
health
conhfts, prove
hurtful rather
than fervice-
able,
and difpofe
them
to
have
the
difeafe
more
unfavorably,
than
if
they
were
to be
inoculated
without
ufeing any
medical
affiftance
at
all
;
but
thefe
cafes
are
perhaps
few
: And
fuch
perfon?,
when
no
ways
prepared,
have
from inoculation
alone, and
a
care
to
avoid
all
errors
in the non-
natnrab.
(
9 )
aatuTils,
had the
(mall-pox
in
the
flighted de-
gree,
and
moft favorable manner
pbflible.
The
conditions
necefTary
for this purpofe, whe-
ther
natural
or
acquired
by preparation, are
*'
healthy
fubjec"ts, a
fweet breath,
a
foft, fkin,
"
arid
fuch
a
difpofition
of the
juices, that a
"
flight
wound or
fcarification will foeedily
"
heal."
*
Thcfe denote
a healthy
ftate
of
the
blood
as
well
as
of
the
nerves and fkin, on
which
the
effects of
this
difeafe. very
much
depends,
and
although
thcfe
conditions tend greatly
to
render
the
difeafe
mild, whether
taken
in
the na-
tural
way,
or by
inoculation,
yet
independently
of
every
other
circumftance,
it may be
faid
very
truly in
praife
of
inoculation,
that
it contributes
greatly
to
render
the difeafe
more mild
and fafd
in itfelf.
.
Of
this
we
need
no
greater
proof than
what
Mr Gatti produces
f
;
he
afferts
that in
the
Le-
vant
where the
fmall-pox,
taken
in
the
natural
way,
is
always
as
mortal as
in
other places,
ino-
culation is ever
void of
danger.
There
we
meet
with women
who
have
inoculated
thoufands,
without any
dangercrUs
accident
having
befallen
any
of them,
and
the
only
preparation
they
re-
gard is, to
fee
that
the
fubjecls
of the
operation
are fuitably
prepared
to
their
hands by
nature,
and have the
conditions
already
enumerated
;
wherefore We
havercafon to
believe
that
among
all
the
advantages
from
inoculation,
the
greateit
B
of
G«ttT.
f
Picju£c,
fur
!a M«*hod«
A"
iMcvUr,
pafe
67-
(
io
)
of
all
is
the power
of
choofing
in
what
part
of
the
body,
the
variolous
matter
fhall
enter.
In
the
natural
fmall-pox,
the
contagion
is
moft
com-
monly
taken
into the
ftomach,
in
deglutition,
or
apply'd
immediately
to
the
brain
and
lungs
by
refpiration,
organs
of
the
moft
delicate
kind,
and
whofe
actions
are
moft
eflenrial
to
life
;
here
the
variolous
matter by
exerting
its
whole
undirnin-
ifhed
force,
acl:s
with
all
the
energy
ot
its
poifo-
nous
quality, to
injure
the
blood
and
nerves,
and
produces
the
moft
fatal
effects,
whilft in
the
other
way, being
received
in a
very
fmall
quantity,
by
a
verv
flight
incifion
in
the
ikin, it
muft
pafs
through the
lymphatic
veflels
and
glands,
which
ferve as
ftrainers,
and
which do
not
fufter
it to
en-
ter the blood,
without
being
firft
diluted
with
lymph in its
courfe
to
them,
through
the
veflels
of abforption,
which
convey
the
fmalleft
portion
of it,
mixed
with
a
very
great
proportion
ot
lymph,
and
therefore
in a
vaftly
weakened
ftate
?
firft
to the
glands,
and
from
thence
to
the
blood
ftfelf.
In refpect
to
the
choice
of matter
for
inocula-'
tion, the principle
circumftance
to
be
attended
to,
is that it
ought
to
be
taken
from
a
patient
who has
the
large
diftincl:
kind,
before
the
de-
cline of
the difeafe,
and
that is
free
from
every
contagious diforder.
From
thefe
circumftances
which
inconteftably
prove
the
great benefits
arifing
from
inoculation,'
being
now well
known
and
eftablillied, the
prac-
tice
(
II
)
tiqfi
of
it
in
America
is
become
very
general
in
the middle
colonies
;
from
whence,
together
with
tli£
improvements
of
employing
a
cooler regi-
men,
a milder
preparation,
and the
fmalinefs of
the
incilion for
ingrafting the variolous matter,
thefmall-pox
is now
difarmed
of its
former
ter-
rors,
and become
an
innocent difeafe.
But the
deyaftations
which
it
has formerly made
in
New-
England,
in
the
natural
way, and the
apprchen-
lions which
have
filled the minds
of many,
con-
cerning
its fatal eft'ecls,
have made the inhabi-
tants
of thefe nothern
colonies
take
great
pains
to prevent
its getting a footing
here
;
by
this
means
it has been
kept
out
from among them,
for
a
great
number
of
years,
till within
a
twelve
month
paft, daring
which time
it has
been in-
troduced by
the
Britiih
troops,
into
the
town
of
Bofton
;
and
inoculation,
which
was
formerly
common
enough, been
generally
employed
a-
gain,
with
the
greateft
iuccefs
:
In the
mean
while
from the
communication
betwixt
the
town
and
country
being
cut off,
and
the pains
taken
to
prevent its
fpreading
through
the
coun-
try,
whenever
it had
made
its
appearance
there,
it
has b-cn
almoft
wholly
confined
to the city.
Bat
fince
the
late
rendition
of Bofton to
the
American
arms
from
the
numbers
who have
had
the
difeafe fo
recent,
and
thofe
who were
left
be-
hind
with the
(mall
pox
upon
them, and
from
the infection
that
may be
fuppofed
to
remain
£ov
a
long time
in
the
bedding
and haufes
of thofe
\/ho have.
had
it
;
as
well as
from
its having
brqk
:
out
(
»*
)
put
among
the
foldiery, few
of
whom
have
cyh
^•ad
the
diforder,
there is
room
to
imagine
not-
handing
all the
precaution
taken to
prevent,
\vjll now fpread
through
the
country
?
^aps
from the marching
the
troops,
back-
d
forwards,
and the
continual moving
habitants
to and
from
Bofton, it
may
coni
s;
ger.cial through
all
the New-
England
nents.
In
<b
dflicate
a
juncture when we are ftrug-
gling with ah oppreffive war,
what
an
addition
fault
it prove to the burden, fhould
the
fmall-pox
•fpread faft
in^the
natural way
;
and
what an ad-
vantage
muft it be to render inoculation
familiar
every-where,
and
to have
a
fuincient number
of
jpraclitioners
at
hand,
who
are
experienced in trie
treatment
of
the difeafe, and
who
are well
ac-
quainted
with
the practice
and
late improvement
of inoculation ?
Any attempt
to
render the
knowledge
of
this
matter
more
general,
by
re-
moving
every
prejudice
againft it,
or
by recom-
mending
to public
notice the
belt
treatifes
on
the
fubjeel: by
thofe
who
have
experienced the
good
effects
of the
practice
they
recommend,
I think
cannot fail of
being
received with
candour.
In
that
view, I
now
prefume
to
urge
the
good peo-
ple
of
this
country
to. the
perufal
of
the follow-
ing
treatife,
on
the
prefent
method
of
inoculati-
on, by
the
illuftrious
and defervedly
celebrated
Baron
Dimfdale,
to
whom
both
Europe
and
Ame-
jica
will
be
ever
indebted
for
his improvements
in
inoculation
and the treatment
of the
difeafe,
and
(
'3
5
and who
has
carry
'd the
benefits
arifing from
the
effects
much
farther
than,
was ever
pra&ifed
by
any
of
his
predecefibrs,
not
excepting
the
great
Sydenham
himfelf.
His
method
like
that
of
Sydenham,
proceed-
ing
op
the
mre
ground
of
experiment
and
oh-
feryation,
is
founded
on
plain
tacts,
limple
and
uniform,
in
which
he
appears
not
to have
fufrcred
the
illufions
of
mere
theory,
to have
ufurped
the
place
of
experience,
or
to
have
perverted
hisjudg-
ment.
The
good
efFecls
of
his
method
are
con-
firmed
by
the
united
fuffrages
of
the
beft
practi-
tioners,
and
have
eftablifhed
his
character
on
the
moft
folid
bafis.
His talents
and
great
reputati-
on
are
well
known
in
the literary
world.
The
utility
of
the
work
and the
favourable
reception
its
firft
appearance
met
with
from
the
publick,
as
well
as
the avidity
with
which
its
feveral
edi-
tions
have
been
received,
may
juftly
fupereedc
every
other
eulogy,
and render
any
apology
for
its
publication^
this
time,
unneceflary
j
nor
have
1
the
vanity
to imagine my
approbation
is
needed,
or
can ftamp
any value
on
the
performance.
There
are few
perfons
who
need be
told,
that
his
eminence
in
his
profeffion,
and the
fuccefs
of
his
practice,
in
the
treatment
of the
difeafe,
procu-
red
his
being
fent
from
Great-
Britain
to
thexourt
of
Mufcovy,
to
inoculate
the
Ruffian
Emprefe
and
her
Son
;
that
he
was
enobled
for
this
fer-
vice
and was
made
body
phyfician
to
her
Imperi-
al
Majefty
;
and
after
inoculating
many
of
the
firft
perfonages
in the
empire,
fuccefsfully,
lis
re-
turned
irome
crowned
with
honours.
If
If I
miftake
not
the
exact
epocha,
it
was
juft
.
at a
time
when
that
magnanimous
Princefs
wa
9
about
to
engage
in
war
with
fo
formidable a
power
as
the
Turks, and
in
which
me
came oft
ib
vi&orious.
Far
from
dreading
the confc-
quence
of
inoculation,
at
fo
critical a
period,
fhe
judged
it
to
be a
matter
of the
higheft
impor-
tance,
to
iecure
againft
taking
the (mall-pox in
the
natural
way,
which
the
war might otherwife:
introduce,
and
the
fear
of
its
dreadful effects
might
impede
the
operation
of her arms.
In
that
particular,
(he
has
held
forth an
example worthy
of our
imitation^
and
which
by
the event proved
the wifdom
of
the
meafure.
.
From
the
prefentpoflure
ofpublic
affairs
and
the
moral
impracticability of
preventing
the
fpread-
ing
of
the
fmati-po'x in the
natural
way, nothing-
can
be
more
interefting to this
country,
than
the
manner
in which the prefent
attempt to intro-
duce
inoculation
may
be
received and
encoura-
ged.
If it were once to
eftabliih
itielf
in
this
province
it would
be
the
fureft
means of extend-
ing
its falutary influence throughout
the
neigh-
bouring
colonies thatare
in
a
iimilar
fituation*
and
the
practice of
ij
being kept up,
the
disor-
der
would
never become
formidable
again,
nor
excite
that
panick
it
has
often
doncia
times
pad,
.Happy
for
mankind,
wherever
inoculation has
08$9
had a
fair
trial,
thole
prejudices, that
are apt
icj
infect
vulgar
and
weak minds, foon
vamih,
ironi the
advantages'
that attend
the
practice
of
to
(
'5
)
it.
Formerly
there
were
fome,
otherwife,
fert-
fible
people, fo alarmed
about
the
confequence
of the
operation,
as to
think
"
the
fmalUpo*
by
"
inoculation
as
dangerous, as
when
taken
the
natu-
"
ral way
;
and
that
it was
contrary to
morality
"
andrehgion
to
practife
it."
The
former
of thefe
objections to
it, 1
hope,
I
have
fully
anticipated,
and fhewn
them to
be
deftitute
of
truth
;
and in
anfwer
to the
latter,
I mail
juft
obferve,
that in
the
middle
colonies
of
America,
particularly
in
Penfylvania,
the
Jiirfeys
and
New-
York,
where
the
difeafe
has
long
been
endcmial,
from
the
u-
nivcrfal
practice
of
inoculation,
it has
become
in
a
manner
harmlefs,
and
there
are few
people
to
have
the
difeafe
but
infants
and
ftrangers.
There,
inftead
of
confidering
it
as a
crime to
inoculate,
people
would
accufe
themfelves
of
being
acceffa-
ry
to
the
death
of
fuch
as
fell a
facrifice
to
the
natural
fmalKpox,
if, by
their
neglecl:
the
opera-
tion had
been
omitted.
They take
care
to
have
all
under
their
charge
inoculated,
when
at the
moll
fuitable
age
for
taking
the
difeafe,
eft
ceming
them
r
elves
refponfible
to
their
children
and
fami-
lies,
whofe
prefervation
they
are
bound
to
con-
fult
;
and
to
the
community
.of
which
they
are
members.
It
may
be
there
are
fome
humane
peribns
wfaA
have
no
objection
againft
inoculation
themfelves,
who,
neverthelefs,
"think
"
the
appreheniion
of
«?
thofe,
who
have
never
had
the
difeafe
is
a
fuf-
"
ficient reafon
for
difallowing
tlie
practice
of it
"
in
others."
If
this*
be
admitted.
as
fatisfactory
where
(
'6
)
where the dueafe few
not
made
its
appearance^
and
is
in no
danger of
fpreading
;
*'
are
not
the
fears
of
thofe,
on
the other hand,
of
equal force
and
validity
in
favour of
inoculation, who
^re
expofed
to
take the infection,
leaft
they
fltould be
feized with
it
in
the natural way
;
and
is
it not
equally
juft that thofe perfons mould
be
allowed
to guard themfelves
and their
families
from
the
dangerous effects of the natural
fmall-
pox,
by
employing
inoculation^ as that
others
ihould
forbid them
;
or is the
intereft
of
that
part
of
the
community who wifh
to
prefervc
themfelves
from
the
ravages of a
deftrucrive
dff-
eafe
by
means of
it, lefs
to
be regarded
than
of
that
other
part
who do
not
choofe
to
practife
it ?
To
forbid
it,
when
thus
circumftanced,
is
a
grea-
ter
volation
of
the
natural rights of mankind
to
make
ufe
of
the
means of feH-prefervation,
than
to
employ
them,
though others
may be
averfe
to
the
meafure
;
efpecially
when the foeiety at
fefge is
benefited
by it". How
wife
is
it,
then,,
in
every
community, where there
is
danger of
fpreading
the
difeafe, to provide for the fafety of
its members
by
rendering the
practice
of
inocu-
lation
as
Univerfal
as poflible.,
By it
whole
countries
are freed from
conftantr
dread
of the
mifchiefs
that might arife
from
its ra-
cing
amongft
them,
at
a
time
when
they are
leaft
prepared, and
when
few
amongft
them
having
had
the
difeafe, are
in
a
iituation to fuccour
their
friends,
by
which
means,
thoufands
fall
f\-\ily
vic-
tims to
its deftructivc
rage*
The
(
l
7 )
The
fubject
is
important!
and
the
publick is
greatly
i^ereflt
;
and not
the lets
to,
that
it
lru
been
to comparatively
little practice', and
therefore
is yet
fo new to
many in this
country*
In
the
treatment
of
difeafes*, miftakes
at full
have
a
fatal
tendency,
and there is a
neceffity
of
a
fk.il-
lui
director,
to prevent
errors
on
account
of the
pernicious
comequence
of
them, which
acquire
an
eftabli.'hment by
lime, cuitom
oa
great
autho-
rities.
1
-frete,
i
'''.
'.,ine, Dimfdalc's tieatife will
have an happy
tendency
to prevent,
by
renci'ring
the
practice
of
inoculation more
familiar
and
bet-
ter
undei
flood;
1
o thofe who have not
had
much
opportunity
of feeing
in
what manner
any
phyfical
operation
is
belt managed,
or how
a par-
ticular
dreaiois
treated
with
the
greater!
fuccefs,
it
will always
be
of
inSnite advantage to
avail
themfeH'cs of
the
affiffcanee
of a Ikilful
pilot.
Na-
ture
conceals
many
of her
works
fo
clolcly
as
of-
ten to
elude
the
researches of the
moil
mqujJifei >
e,
and
requires
the
experience of
others
to point
them
out.
This author's
practice
will
caff
great light on
the
bufinefs
of
inoculation, and
ferve
as
a clue to
guide the attentive
follower
in
the treatment of
a
difeafe
in
which
'lie
moll
clear
fighted
often
have
occafion
of help
to
(turn
danger, an<j|
to con-
duct
thofe
who
are committed
to
their care
through
the
dil
order, with
fati.vfaction and ho-
nour to
themfel-vest,
and
benefit
to the
communi-
ty.
In
the
account which
our
author has
given
us
of
his
practice
of
inoculation and
treatment
of
(
is
)
of
the
fick,
he
has
laid
down
ample
directions,
and,
all
along,
expreffedhimfelf
with
remarkable
perfpicuity,
and
as
much
elegance
of diction,
as
the
fubjecl:
will
admit.
From
the
experience
I
have
had
of
the
good
effects of
Dimfdale's
method of
inoculation, 1
ima-
gine, in
recommending
it
to fuch
practitioners
as
may
be
fliortly
engaged
in
taking
care
of thofe,
amongft
whom
the
fmall-pox
may
fpread,
and
particularly
to
the
furgeons
of the
hoi'pital,
and
thofe
in the
army
under
my
own
direction,
I
am
performing
one
of
the
moft
important
fervices a
perfon
in
my
ftation
can
well
render to them,
or
to
the
country
and
people
he
is
amongft. Every
attempt
to
fpread
the
knowledge
of any ufeful
practice,
has a
natural
tendency
to advance fci-
ence
and
redound
to
the
publick
good.
All the
merit
I
propofe to
myfelf
in the
recommendation
of this
author,
is
the
holding
him forth to more
publick
view,
and
a
defire
to
excite
a
general at-
tention
to
fo
valuable
a
performance
amongft
fome
who
may
be
lefs
acquainted
with its value.
As
the
publick
good
is
my
intention in
this,
1
flatter
myfelf I
mall
attain
my
wifli,
being periwaded
that
no
perfon
who
fhall
carefully
read the
fol-
lowing
fheets,and
attend
to the
information they
contain!
will
think
their
time
mifapply'd,
or re-
pent
their
having
followed
fo
fare
and
expeilcn-
ced a
guide
in
the
practice
of
inoculation.
JOHN
MORGAN,
Cambridge,
in
New-England
yipfil
1
9th
1776.
v*.
*r *
rW^i^
r
i
>
m*L