simplebooklet thumbnail

Title
Compare and Contrast
Lesson Objective
Vocabulary Objectives
Learn target vocabulary to enhance reading comprehension.
Apply target vocabulary in written responses and oral language.
Comprehension Objectives
Compare and contrast based on prior knowledge and visuals.
Compare and contrast based on information in a text.
Use a Venn diagram to represent text.
Background Information for Teacher
N/A
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
“What’s Alike? What’s Different?” Student Page 1
“Compare and Contrast,” Student Page 3
“Venn Diagram,” Student Page 2
Passage “Getting Ready for a Parade” Level 3, Student Page 6
“Venn Diagram,” Student Page 2
Paper
Pencil
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Target Vocabulary Words: skiing, muscles, balance, fit, helmet, squat
When introducing each word, first say the whole word. Next, say the word parts slowly while clapping them. Then say the word
quickly again. Have the student repeat with you the steps above. Finally, write the word on the board or chart. Read the definition of
each word to the student and give examples or sample sentences to build meaning.
skiing ski • ing ('ske-iŋ) Skiing is a winter sport that people do in the snow. Skiers wear long, narrow skis that let them glide down a
snowy mountain. Skiing is one of the sports in the Winter Olympics.
muscles mus • cles ('m e-s elz) Muscles are the strong, stretchy body parts you can feel under your skin. Muscles make your bones
move. Paul lifts weights to build up his arm muscles.
balance bal • ance ('ba-l n(t)s) You balance on something when you use your muscles to keep you from tipping or falling. The dancer
had to balance on her toes as she twirled around.
fit fit ('fit) If you are fit, you are healthy and strong. Maria stays fit by jogging and swimming.
helmet hel • met ('hel-m t) A helmet is a hard hat that protects your head and keeps it from getting hurt. A football helmet covers
more of your head than a bicycle helmet.
When we compare two things, we tell how they are alike. When we contrast two things, we tell how they are different.
Write and read the words alike, like, similar, both, also, too, and in the same way. Here are a few words and phrases we use when
we compare things. Write Compare
as the heading for the list.
Let’s use the words to compare two things, or tell how they are alike.
Distribute Student Page 1. (Step 3)
Then write and read the following sentences with blanks:
An alligator and a shark are alike because they both ____.
Alligators have ____, and sharks have _____ too.
Reread the sentences using words in the blanks to model for the student.
Challenge the student to complete the sentences to create more comparisons. Encourage him/her to use the pictures as well as facts
they already know about sharks and alligators. Affirm the student of his/her ideas or provide corrective feedback. Then model ways to
restate the comparisons using other words from the Compare word list.
Write and read the words unlike, different, not, and but.
Here are a few words we use when we contrast things. Write Contrast
as the heading for the second list.
Now let’s use these words to contrast two things, or tell how they are different. Write and read the following sentences with
blanks:
Unlike a shark, an alligator has _____.
A shark has_____, but an alligator does not.
Reread the sentences using words in the blanks to model for the student.
Have the student complete the sentences to create more contrasts. Affirm student of his/her ideas or provide corrective feedback.
Then model ways to restate the contrasts using other words from the Contrast
word list.
Draw a Venn diagram to compare and contrast a shark and an alligator.
Direct the student to the Venn diagram on Student Page 1. (Step 3)
Point out parts of the diagram and explain what kind of information belongs in each section. Repeat details about alligators and
sharks from the discussion and have the student point to his/her diagram to show where each one belongs in the diagram. Then
record the details in the diagram on the board.
Let’s practice comparing and contrasting.
Distribute “Compare and Contrast,” Student Page 3; and “Venn Diagram,” Student Page 2. (Step 3)
Have the student read aloud the text under each picture. Guide him/her in identifying and underlining related details about each
activity.
Finally, guide the student in recording the details in the Venn diagram. Create and complete a diagram on the board for the student to
use as a model or for checking his/her answers.
Now read another passage and watch for similarities and differences. Underline details you can compare and contrast.
Record your findings on the Venn diagram.
Give the student a copy of “Venn Diagram,” Student Page 2; and “Getting Ready for a Parade” Level 3, Student Page 6. (Step 3)
Review the meaning of compare and contrast. Monitor the student's progress and remind him/her to watch for and underline pairs of
details he/she can compare or contrast. Have the student record their findings on their Venn diagram.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets needed to complete the lesson
ANSWERS
Skiing:
winter sport
need skis, poles, boots, and warm
clothes
Both:
build leg muscles
use muscles to balance
fun
good workout
Skateboarding:
warm weather sport
need skateboard, pads,
and helmet
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Compare and Contrast Practice (online) activity