Home Buyer's Guide
to the Title and Escrow Process in California
2
10. Benets of our Eagle Owner's Policy
11. Compare our Eagle Owner's Policy
12. Ways to hold title
13. Explanation of a preliminary report
14. What to avoid during the closing process
15. Closing your escrow; after the closing
02. Quick reference
03. Welcome
04. Terms you should know
05. Key professionals involved in your
transaction
06. The life of an escrow
07. The escrow process
08. Understanding title insurance
09. The importance of title protection
Contents
Title Ofcer
Assistant
Company
Address
City/State/Zip
Email
Email
Phone
Fax
Escrow Ofcer
Escrow Assistant
Address
City/State/Zip
Email
Email
Phone
Fax
Your Escrow Number
Your New Address
City/State/Zip
Quick Reference
Title Contacts
Escrow Contacts
3
Welcome to the home-buying process. Throughout this process, you can count on First American to guide
you smoothly through your transaction, and provide expert answers to your questions. We are happy to serve you.
Count on us for service
First American's professionals are proud to provide you with the title insurance that assures your home ownership. Backed
by First American Title Insurance Company, your transaction will be expertly completed in accordance with state-specic
underwriting standards and state and federal regulatory requirements.
Count on us for stability
First American Title Insurance Company is the principal subsidiary of First American Financial Corporation, and one of
the largest suppliers of title insurance services in the nation. With roots dating back to 1889, we’ve served California
families for generations.
Count on us for convenience
First American has a direct ofce or agent near you, offering convenient locations throughout California. We also have
an extensive network of ofces and agents throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin
Islands, Bermuda, Guam, and the United Kingdom.
Count on us to meet your needs
First American Financial Corporation offers more than title insurance and escrow services through its subsidiaries. Our
subsidiaries also provide property data, and title plant records and images; home warranties; property and casualty
insurance; and banking, trust, and advisory services.
Count on First American
4
AMENDMENTS
A change—either to alter, add to, or correct—part of an
agreement without changing the principal idea or essence.
APPRAISAL
An estimate of value of property resulting from analysis of
facts about the property; an opinion of value.
ASSUMPTION
Taking over another person’s nancial obligation; taking title
to a parcel of real property with the Buyer assuming liability
for paying an existing note secured by a deed of trust against
the real property.
BENEFICIARY
The recipient of benets, often from a deed of trust; usually
the lender.
CLOSE OF ESCROW
Generally the date the documents are recorded and title
passes from Seller to Buyer. On this date, the Buyer becomes
the legal owner, and title insurance becomes effective.
COMPARABLE SALES
Sales that have similar characteristics as the subject real
property, used for analysis in the appraisal. Commonly called
“comps.”
DEED OF TRUST
An instrument used in many states in place of a mortgage.
DEED RESTRICTIONS
Limitations in the deed to a parcel of real property that
dictate certain uses that may or may not be made of the real
property.
EARNEST MONEY DEPOSIT
Down payment made by a purchaser of real property as
evidence of good faith; a deposit or partial payment.
EASEMENT
A right, privilege or interest limited to a specic purpose
that one party has in the land of another.
HAZARD INSURANCE
Real estate insurance protecting against re, some natural
causes, vandalism, etc., depending upon the policy. Buyer
often adds liability insurance and extended coverage for
personal property.
IMPOUNDS
A trust type of account established by lenders for the
accumulation of borrower’s funds to meet periodic payments
of taxes, mortgage insurance premiums and/or future
insurance policy premiums, required to protect their security.
LEGAL DESCRIPTION
A description of land recognized by law, based on
government surveys, spelling out the exact boundaries of
the entire parcel of land. It should so thoroughly identify a
parcel of land that it cannot be confused with any other.
LIEN
A form of encumbrance that usually makes a specic parcel
of real property the security for the payment of a debt or
discharge of an obligation. For example, judgments, taxes,
mortgages, deeds of trust.
MORTGAGE
The instrument by which real property is pledged as security
for repayment of a loan.
PITI
A payment that combines Principal, Interest, Taxes, and
Insurance.
POWER OF ATTORNEY
A written instrument whereby a principal gives authority to
an agent. The agent acting under such a grant is sometimes
called an “Attorney-in-Fact.”
PURCHASE AGREEMENT
The purchase contract between the Buyer and Seller. It is
usually completed by the real estate agent and signed by
the Buyer and Seller.
QUITCLAIM DEED
A deed operating as a release, intending to pass any title,
interest, or claim which the grantor may have in the property,
but not containing any warranty of a valid interest or title by
the grantor.
RECORDING
Filing documents affecting real property with the County
Recorder as a matter of public record.
Terms you should know
5
REALTOR
®
A Realtor
®
is a licensed real estate agent and a member
of the National Association of Realtors®, a real estate
trade association. Realtors also belong to their state and
local Association of Realtors.
REAL ESTATE AGENT
A real estate agent is licensed by the state to represent
parties in the transfer of property. Every Realtor is a real
estate agent, but not every real estate agent has the
professional designation of a Realtor
®
.
LISTING AGENT
A key role of the listing agent or broker is to form a legal
relationship with the homeowner to sell the property and
place the property in the Multiple Listing Service.
BUYER'S AGENT
A key role of the buyer’s agent or broker is to work with
the buyer to locate a suitable property and negotiate a
successful home purchase.
MULTIPLE LISTING SERVICE (MLS)
The MLS is a database of properties listed for sale by
Realtors who are members of the local Association of
Realtors. Information on an MLS property is available
to thousands of Realtors.
TITLE COMPANY
These are the people who carry out the title search
and examination, work with you to eliminate the title
exceptions you are not willing to take subject to, and
provide the policy of title insurance regarding title to the
real property.
ESCROW OFFICER
An escrow ofcer leads the facilitation of your escrow,
including escrow instructions preparation, document
preparation, funds disbursement, and more.
Key professionals involved in your transaction
6
FINAL DOCUMENTS
SENT TO
INTERESTED PARTIES
AFTER RECORDING, CONFIRMED
ESCROW DISBURSES FUNDS
BUYER
RECEIVES KEYS FROM
REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONAL
BUYER
ADVISES ESCROW OF HOME
INSURANCE COMPANY
PRELIMINARY REPORT RECEIVED
AND APPROVED BY BUYER
LOAN DOCUMENTS
RETURNED
TO LENDER FOR REVIEW
SEPARATE APPOINTMENTS SET:
BUYER & SELLER
SIGN DOCUMENTS
ESCROW ENSURES ALL CONTRACT
CONDITIONS HAVE BEEN MET
DOCUMENTS RECORDED
AND ESCROW CLOSED
BUYER
RECEIVES FINAL LOAN
APPROVAL FROM LENDER
CLOSING DOCUMENTS
COMPILED BY ESCROW
ESCROW OPENED AND
PRELIMINARY REPORT ORDERED
INSPECTION REPORTS SENT
TO APPLICABLE PARTY, REVIEWED
AND NOTIFICATION SENT
LENDER "FUNDS LOAN"
(SENDS FUNDS TO ESCROW)
BUYER
DEPOSITS REQUIRED FUNDS
LOAN DOCUMENTS PREPARED BY
LENDER
& SENT TO ESCROW
APPRAISAL ORDERED BY
& COMPLETED FOR LENDER
VARIOUS INSPECTIONS
ORDERED
SELLER
REVIEWS AND ACCEPTS
CONTRACT FROM BUYER
BUYER
SELECTS HOME AND
SUBMITS CONTRACT WITH
LOAN STATUS REPORT (LSR)
SELLER
PREPARES HOUSE FOR
SHOWING & SELLING
SELLER
SELECTS A REALTOR
The Life of an Escrow
Understanding your escrow transaction
BUYER
VIEWS HOMES WITH
REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONAL
BUYER
GETS PRE-APPROVED BY LENDER
IF NEW LOAN NEEDED
BUYER
SELECTS A REALTOR
START
7
WHAT IS AN ESCROW?
The escrow is the process of having a neutral party manage the exchange of money for real property. The escrow holder
is known as an escrow or settlement ofcer or agent. The Buyer deposits funds and the Seller deposits a deed with the
escrow holder along with all of the other documents required to remove all "contingencies" (conditions and approvals) in
the purchase agreement prior to closing.
HOW IS AN ESCROW OPENED?
Once a purchase agreement is signed by all necessary parties, the agent representing the party who will pay the fee
selects an escrow holder and the Buyer's earnest money deposit and contract are submitted to the escrow holder. From
this point, the escrow holder will follow the mutual written instructions of the Buyer and Seller, maintaining a neutral stance
to ensure that neither party has an unfair advantage over the other. The escrow holder also follows the instructions of the
Buyer's new lender, the Seller's existing lender, and both parties'agents. The escrow holder ensures the transparency of
the transaction, while carefully maintaining the privacy of the consumers.
Open escrow and, if instructed to do so, deposit your good faith funds in a separate escrow account
Order a title search to determine ownership and status of the subject real property
Issue a preliminary report and begin the process of eliminating the title exceptions you and your lender are not
willing to take title subject to.
Request payoff information for the Seller's loans, other liens, homeowner's association fees, etc.
Prorate fees, such as real property taxes, per the contract, and prepare the settlement statement
Set separate appointments allowing the Seller and you to sign documents and deposit funds
Review documents ensuring all conditions and legal requirements are fullled; request funds from lender
When all funds are deposited, record documents with the County Recorder's Ofce to transfer the subject real
property to you
After the recordation is conrmed, close escrow and disburse funds, including Seller's proceeds, loan payoffs, etc.
Prepare and send nal documents to all parties involved
Your escrow professional may:
8
Prior to the development of the title industry in the late 1800s, a homebuyer received a grantor’s warranty, attorney’s
title opinion, or abstractor’s certicate as assurance of home ownership. The buyer relied on the nancial integrity of
the grantor, attorney, or abstractor for protection. Today, homebuyers look primarily to title insurance to provide this
protection. Title insurance companies are regulated by state statute. They are required to post nancial guarantees
to ensure that any claims will be paid in a timely fashion. They also must maintain their own “title plants” which house
duplicates of recorded deeds, mortgages, plats, and other pertinent county property records.
WHAT IS TITLE INSURANCE?
Title insurance provides coverage for certain losses due to defects in the title that, for the most part, occurred prior to
your ownership. Title insurance protects against defects such as prior fraud or forgery that might go undetected until
after closing and possibly jeopardize your ownership and investment.
WHY IS TITLE INSURANCE NEEDED?
Title insurance insures Buyers against the risk that they did not acquire marketable title from the Seller. It is primarily
designed to reduce risk or loss caused by defects in title from the past. A Loan Policy of Title Insurance protects the
interest of the mortgage lender, while an Owner's Policy protects the equity of you, the Buyer, for as long as you or your
heirs (in certain policies) own the real property.
WHEN IS THE PREMIUM DUE?
You pay for your Owner’s title insurance policy only once, at the close of escrow. Who pays for the Owner’s Policy and
Loan Policy varies depending on local customs.
Understanding Title Insurance
The title industry and title insurance in brief
9
How title insurance differs from other forms of insurance
The importance of title protection
Deeds by persons supposedly single, but secretly married
Deeds in lieu of foreclosure given under duress
Marital rights of spouse purportedly, but not legally,
divorced
Impersonation of the true owner of the land
Deeds by minors
Deeds by persons of unsound mind
Deeds to or from defunct corporations
Defective acknowledgements by notaries
Duress in execution of instruments
Erroneous reports furnished by tax ofcials
There are many title issues that could cause you to lose your real property or your mortgage investment. Even the most
careful search of public records may not disclose the most dangerous threat: hidden risks. These issues may not be
uncovered until years later. Without title insurance from a reputable and nancially solvent company, the ownership of
your home could be jeopardized. Here are some examples of title issues that may occur.
Unlike other forms of insurance, title insurance emphasizes loss prevention for the insured. Title professionals perform
labor-intensive work to nd and address title issues that could threaten your homeownership. This upfront analysis gives
you, as a policy holder, the peace of mind that your title risk has been effectively reduced. In contrast, insurance based
on loss assumption (such as auto or property and casualty insurance) requires little upfront work because claims cannot
be predicted or prevented, and premium funds are needed only in the event of an accident or other covered issue.
These types of insurance also require annual coverage payments, unlike title insurance which is paid for only once upon
the purchase of your home or establishment of a new mortgage.
Forged deeds, releases, etc.
Mistakes in recording legal documents
Surviving children omitted from will
Administration of estate of persons absent but not
deceased
Birth or adoption of children after date of will
Claims of creditors against real property sold by heirs
or devisees
Deed of community property recited to be separate
property
Deeds by foreign parties
10
Eagle Owner’s Policy benets you won’t get with a
Standard ALTA Owner’s Policy
Post-policy Forgery
Post-policy Encroachments
Post-policy Adverse Possession
Coverage extended to homeowner when someone
claims to have the insured’s title arising out of someone
else’s continued use and occupancy
Post-Policy Easement by Prescription
Coverage if another claims right to use a part of the
insured’s land as an easement because of continuous
use over time
Building Permit and Zoning Violation
Coverage for losses up to $25,000, after a small
deductible, for building permit violations and forced
remediation of zoning violations, and up to the full
policy amount for forced removal of structures due to
zoning violations
Expanded Access
Expanded to include both vehicular and pedestrian
access to and from land, based upon legal right
Encroachment of Improvements onto Easements and
Set-backs
First American Title Insurance Company’s EAGLE Owner’s Policy provides expanded title coverage for owners of one-
to-four family residences, including condominiums. Coverages included in the EAGLE Owner’s Policy offer the highest
levels of protection available to our California homeowners.
Subdivision Violation
Homeowners are covered up to $10,000, after a small
deductible, for protection against subdivision violations
prior to purchase
Restrictive Covenant Violations
Coverage provided for violations of restrictive covenants,
occuring before homeowner acquired land if the
homeowner is forced to correct or remove the violation
or if the homeowner’s title is lost or taken because of the
violation
Structural Damage for Mineral Abstraction or Easement Use
Living Trust Coverage
Coverage includes not only the trustees of a trust, but the
beneciaries as well
Encroachment of Boundary Walls and Fences
Protection of up to $5,000, after a small deductible, for
encroachments onto a neighbor’s land, onto an easement,
or over a building set-back line
Eagle Owner's Policy
The benets of First American Title Insurance Company's Eagle
Owner's Policy versus the Standard ALTA Owner's Policy
11
As with any insurance contract, the insuring provisions express the coverage afforded by the title insurance policy and there are exceptions, exclusions and conditions to coverage that limit or narrow
the coverage afforded by the policy. Also, some coverage may not be available in a particular area or transaction due to legal, regulatory, or underwriting considerations. Please contact a First
American representative for further information. The services described above are typical basic services. The services provided to you may be different due to the specics of your transaction or the
location of the real property involved.
Compare First American’s Eagle Owner’s Policy
EAGLE
ALTA
Standard
or CLTA
Protection from:
1 Someone else owns an interest in your title
2 A document is not properly signed
3 Forgery, fraud, duress in the chain of title
4 Defective recording of any document
5 There are restrictive covenants
6 There is a lien on your title because there is:
a) a deed of trust
b) a judgement, tax, or special assessment
c) a charge by a homeowner’s association
7 Title is unmarketable
8 Mechanics lien
9 Forced removal of a structure because it:
a) extends on another property and/or easement
b) violates a restriction in Schedule B
c) violates an existing zoning law*
10
Cannot use the land for a Single-Family Residence because the use violates a restriction in Schedule B or a zoning
ordinance
11 Unrecorded lien by a homeowners association
12 Unrecorded easements
13 Building permit violations*
14 Restrictive covenant violations
15 Post-policy forgery
16 Post-policy encroachment
17 Post-policy damage from extraction of minerals or water
18 Lack of vehicular and pedestrian access
19 Map not consistent with legal description
20 Post-policy adverse possession
21 Post-policy prescriptive easement
22 Covenant violation resulting in your title reverting to a previous owner
23 Violation of building setback regulations
24 Discriminatory covenants
Other benets:
25 Pays rent for substitute land or facilities
26 Rights under unrecorded leases
27 Plain language statements of policy coverage and restrictions
28 Compliance with Subdivision Map Act
29 Coverage for boundary wall or fence encroachment*
30 Added ownership coverage leads to enhanced marketability
31 Insurance coverage for a lifetime
32 Policy adopted by the California Land Title Association (CLTA)
33 Post-policy ination coverage with automatic increase in value up to 150% over ve years
34 Post-policy Living Trust coverage
* Deductible and maximum limits apply. Not available to investors on 1- to 4-unit residential properties.
Coverage may vary based on an individual policy.
12
Vesting
Ways to hold title
TENANCY IN COMMON
JOINT TENANCY COMMUNITY PROPERTY
COMMUNITY PROPERTY
with Right of Survivorship
Parties Two or more persons
1
Two or more natural persons Spouses or domestic partners
2
Spouses or domestic partners
2
Division
Ownership can be divided
into any number of interests,
equal or unequal
Ownership interests
must be equal
Ownership interests
must be equal
Ownership interests
must be equal
Creation
One or more conveyances
(law presumes interests are
equal if not otherwise specied)
Single conveyances (creating
identical interests); vesting
must specify joint tenancy
Presumption from marriage
or domestic partnership or
can be designated in deed
Single conveyance and spouses or
domestic partners must indicate
consent which can be on deed
Possession
and control
Equal Equal Equal Equal
Transferability
Each co-owner may transfer
or mortgage their interest
separately
Each co-owner may transfer
his/her interest separately but
tenancy in common results
Both spouses or domestic
partners must consent to
transfer or mortgage
Both spouses or domestic
partners must consent to
transfer or mortgage
Liens against
one owner
Unless married or domestic
partners, co-owner’s interest not
subject to liens of other debtor/
owner but forced sale can occur
Co-owner’s interest not subject to
liens of other debtor/owner but
forced sale can occur if prior to
co-owner’s/debtor’s death
Entire property may be subject
to forced sale to satisfy debt of
either spouse or domestic partner
Entire property subject to forced
sale to satisfy debt of either
spouse or domestic partner
Death of
co-owner
Decedent’s interest passes
to his/her devisees or heirs
by will or intestacy
Decedent’s interest automatically
passes to surviving joint tentant
(“Right of Survivorship”)
Decedent’s 1/2 interest
passes to surviving spouse
or domestic partner unless
otherwise devised by will
Decedent’s 1/2 interest
automatically passes to surviving
spouse or domestic partnerdue to
right of survivorship
Possible
advantages/
disadvantages
Co-owners interests may be
separately transferable
3
Right of Survivorship (avoids
probate);
may have tax disadvantages
for spouses
Qualied surviorship rights;
mutual consent required for
transfer; surviving spouse
or domestic partner may
have tax advantage
2
Right of survivorship; mutual
consent required for transfer;
surviving spouse or domestic
partner may have tax advantage
1. “Persons includes a natural person as well as validly formed cooperation, limited partnership, limited liability company or general partnership. Trust property is vested in the trustee (usually a natural person or corporation).
2. Transfers by spouses/domestic partners may require a quitclaim deed from the other spouse/partner for title insurance purposes.
3. If co-Owners are spouses/domestic partners, property may be subject to legal presumption of “community property” requiring consent of both spouses/partners to convey or encumber title notwithstanding vesting as “joint
tenancy”
13
IDENTITY STATEMENT
You will be asked to ll out an Identity Statement that
enables our title department to distinguish you from others
with identical names during our search of County records.
It also provides basic information that will be useful to your
escrow ofcer.
HOME LOAN
Unless you are paying cash, assuming a loan, or the seller is
nancing, you will need to apply for a home loan if you have
not already done so. Apply as soon as possible to comply
with the purchase contract and prior to insuring to avoid
delaying the closing.
RESPONSE TO SELLER’S NOTICES
If directed by the contract, you may receive the following
items which require a response from you:
Seller’s property disclosure statement listing any
existing problems known to the seller
Information pertaining to the Homeowners Association
(HOA) or Planned Unit Development (PUD), such as
Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions (CC&Rs),
if applicable
Flood hazard disclosure if the real property is in a
ood area
Independent inspections, such as termite and septic,
and any repairs as required
PRELIMINARY REPORT
You will receive a copy of the preliminary report when we
complete the title search. If you have questions about the
preliminary report, contact your real estate agent or your
escrow ofcer.
CONSIDER THIS
One escrow transaction could involve over 20 individuals,
including real estate professionals, Buyer, Seller, attorney,
escrow ofcer, escrow tecÚician, title ofcer, loan ofcer,
loan processor, loan underwriter, home inspector, termite
inspector, insurance agent, home warranty representative,
contractor, roofer, plumber, pool service, and so on. And
often one transaction depends on another.
When you consider the number of people involved, you can
imagine the opportunities for delays and mishaps. While
your experienced real estate professional, escrow, and title
team can’t prevent unforeseen problems from arising, they
can help to ensure as smooth a closing as possible.
What happens next for the Buyer?
The information below is to help you understand the
contents of the preliminary report you will receive
from First American.
Schedule A
This is the information submitted to our title
department by the escrow ofcer. It contains the basic
information given to us by the Buyer or real estate
professional, such as the legal description of the real
property, sale price, loan amount, lender, name, and
marital status of Buyer and Seller.
Schedule B
The schedule B “exceptions” are items which are
tied to the subject property, and the Buyer's rights
in the title will be subject to these exceptions. These
may include Covenants, Conditions, and Restrictions
(CC&Rs); easements; Homeowners Association by-laws;
leases; and other items which will remain of record and
transfer with the property. The Buyer is asked to sign a
receipt for the schedule B documents which states the
Buyer has read and accepts the contents.
Requirements
These are items that First American needs to delete
and/or record prior to insuring title to the real property.
Items that need to be addressed include:
Current property-tax status
Any assessments that are owed, such as those for a
Homeowners Association
Any encumbrances (or liens) on the real property
Sometimes items show up against a parcel of real
property because another person has a name similar
to an involved party. This is one reason we ask for an
Identity Statement, to determine if items are inaccurate
and can be deleted.
Your Preliminary Report
14
What to avoid during the closing process
Avoid changing jobs
A job change may result in your loan being denied,
particularly if you are taking a lower-paying position or
moving into a different eld. Don’t think you’re safe
because you’ve received approval earlier in the process,
as the lender may call your employer to re-verify your
employment just prior to funding the loan.
Avoid switching banks or moving your money
to another institution
After the lender has veried your funds at one or more
institutions, the money should remain there until needed
for the purchase.
Avoid paying off existing accounts unless
your lender requests it
If your Loan Ofcer advises you to pay off certain bills in
order to qualify for the loan, follow that advice. Otherwise,
leave your accounts as they are until your escrow closes.
Avoid making any large purchases
A major purchase that requires a withdrawal from your
veried funds or increases your debt can result in your not
qualifying for the loan. A lender may check your credit or
re-verify funds at the last minute, so avoid purchases that
could impact your loan approval.
15
THE CLOSING OR SIGNING APPOINTMENT
The escrow holder will contact you or your agent to
schedule a closing or signing appointment. In some
states, this is the "close of escrow." In some others, the
close of escrow is either the day the documents record
or that funds are disbursed. Ask your escrow holder if
you would like clarication about your state's laws.
You will have a chance to review the settlement
statement and supporting documentation. This is your
opportunity to ask questions and clarify terms. You
should review the settlement statement carefully and
report discrepancies to the escrow ofcer. This includes
any payments that may have been missed. You are
responsible for all charges incurred even if overlooked
by the escrow holder, so it's better to bring these to
their attention before closing.
The escrow holder is obligated by law to have the
designated amount of money before releasing any
funds. If you have questions or foresee a problem, let
your escrow holder know immediately.
DON'T FORGET YOUR IDENTIFICATION
You will need valid identification with your photo I.D. on
it when you sign documents that need to be notarized
(such as a deed). A driver's license is preferred. You will
also be asked to provide your social security number for
tax reporting purposes, and a forwarding address.
WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?
If the Buyer is obtaining a new loan, the Buyer's signed
loan documents will be returned to the lender for
review. The escrow holder will ensure that all contract
conditions have been met and will ask the lender
to "fund the loan." If Buyer's loan documents are
satisfactory, the lender will send the check directly to
the escrow holder. When the loan funds are received,
the escrow holder will verify that all necessary funds
are in. Escrow funds will be disbursed to the Seller and
other appropriate payees. Then, you’ll receive the keys
to your home!
We recommend you keep all records pertaining to your
home together in a safe place, including all purchase
documents, insurance, maintenance, and improvements.
HOME WARRANTY REPAIRS
If you have a home warranty plan with First American
Homebuyers Protection, please call them directly and
have your home warrany number available. First
American is one
of the nation's leading and most experienced home
warranty companies.
RECORDED DEED
The original deed to your home will be mailed directly
to you by the County Recorder, generally within four to
six weeks.
TITLE INSURANCE POLICY
First American Title will mail your policy to you in about
two to three weeks.
PROPERTY TAXES
You may not receive a tax statement for the current year
on the home you buy; however, it is your obligation to
make sure the taxes are paid when due. Check with your
mortgage company to nd out if taxes are included with
your payment. For more information on your property
taxes, visit your County Auditor/Controller's Web site.
Closing your escrow
After the closing
800.854.3643 | www.firstam.com
©2012 First American Financial Corporation and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. NYSE:FAF
First American Title Insurance Company makes no express or implied warranty respecting the information presented and assumes no
responsibility for errors or omissions. First American, the eagle logo, First American Title, and rstam.com are registered trademarks
or trademarks of First American Financial Corporation and/or its afliates.
(REV 07/2012)