Acknowledgements to our Sponsors:
The Center for Advanced Studies Foundation (CASF), Wheeler High
School, and the Wheeler Magnet Program would like to thank the
following sponsors for nancially investing in the STEAM Symposium:
STEAM Visionary
MLI SoLutIonS, LLC (2013-14, 2014-15)
STEAM Sponsors
KeMIra CheMICaLS (2014-15)
navKar BuILderS LLC (2014-15)
the SundaraM FaMILy (2014-15, 2015-16)
STEAM Friends
KatIe oBLInger PhotograPhy, the BaILLe FaMILy, the KreuS FaMILy,
the SKLar FaMILy, ragan enterPrISeS, the BLuMenthaL-rodenCaL FaMILy
CuLtureLInK InC & CuLtureLInK reSourCeS (2013-14, 2014-15)
the Cover art Logo deSIgn IS deSIgned By art
Student, Ben taLLy, and teaCher KeLLy Karr.
t
he deSIgn waS CaPtured FroM a PICture
taKen By the huBBLe teLeSCoPe oF a
gaLaxy and CreatIveLy enhanCed wIth BrILLIant
CoLorS and graPhIC deSIgn rePLaCIng the
naturaL ShadeS oF BLaCK, gray and whIte.
Magazine Cover Art
i
2016
Wheeler STEAM Symposium
Celebrating Student STEAM Products with the Community
Abstracts & Pictures
Sponsored by:
The Center For Advanced
Studies Foundation
(CASF)
Magazine Layout/Design:
Charu Shridhar
& Surya Sundaram
ii
The Wheeler STeAM SyMpoSiuM 2016
STUDENT SUCCESS
ONE GOAL
ONE TEAM
The fourth Annual Wheeler STEAM Symposium was held on April 13, 2016.
Over 500 Wheeler students joined by local elementary students presented
their STEAM projects with passion. They demonstrated the relevance of what
they learn in the classroom to the real world to our community and guests.
The Center for Advanced Studies at Wheeler High School became the rst
STEM-Certied Program in Georgia in October 2012 and the rst to become
STEM Recertied in May 2016. Since 2015, our entire school has been encour-
aged to participate in an “Arts” integration with STEM in every subject area.
We are a “Georgia STEM Certied Magnet Program & STEAM Inspired School.
We are accepting the challenge given us in May 2016 by State Superin-
tendent Richard Woods and Cobb Superintendent Chris Ragsdale to
become one of the rst to be STEAM certied in the state of Georgia!
the 2016 wheeLer SteaM SyMPoSIuM IS dedICated to our
S
uPerIntendent ChrIS ragSdaLe For hIS ContInued
SuPPort and ChaLLenge to uS to BeCoMe the FIrSt SteaM
CertIFIed SChooL In the State!
iii
Special Thanks To the Participating Wheeler High School Faculty
Lynn Barry Jeff Kent Mary Rich
Ginny Berkemeier Maureen Klinkmueller Jason Ritchie
Lisa Beville Patsy Kraj Eric Ritenour
Valerie Bolen Leighanne Kuhn Tiffany Stark
John Cody Ian Lindsay Fred Stillwell
Sergio Corvalan Les Love Chase Stroempl
Cheryl Crooks Kate Maloney Kim Tooks
Dejla Todoric John Miller Julie Walls
Ray Furstein Amanda Morton Chris Walstead
Michael Fusia Meggan Muller Dwayne Wasson
Peter Giles Brian Nelson Latrice Wicker
Laura Grier Linda Patterson Nancy Williams
Sharon Hunt Susan Phillips Orren Williams
Nicole Jones Debbie Redmond
Kelly Karr Stacy Regitsky
Much Appreciation goes out to all the Wheeler staff that made the 2016 STEAM
Symposium a huge success! Whether you helped in the planning, training, adver-
tising, supervising and mentoring students, setting up, hosting, taking pictures/
video, interviewing, or cleaning up that evening your contribution was essential.
The STEAM team understands our District’s vision:
One team, One Goal, Student Success!
iv
Special Thanks to the Wheeler High School Student Presenters
Special Thanks to the Wheeler High School Student Presenters
and Hosts that welcomed our Community and Guests at our annual
STEAM Symposium. All students that presented at the Symposium
were also given an opportunity to submit an Abstract for this pub-
lication. Abstracts published were reviewed with required criteria.
2016 STeAM SyMpoSiuM plAnning CoMMiTTee
Wheeler Staff Committee
Cheryl Crooks - Director
Kelly Karr - Logo and Art Director
Ginny Berkemeier - Abstract Director
Leighanne Kuhn - Photography and Video
Mary Rich - Photography
Stacy Regitsky - Advertisement
Nicole Jones - Culinary & Refreshments
Dwayne Wasson - Music Entertainment
Wheeler Parent Support
Magnet Foundation Financial Support & Greeters
PTSA & ABC - Refreshments & Greeters
Larry & Karen Ragan, Renu Gupta, Laurie Dirksen & Emelda Paul (Setup Gym)
Cindy Davis, Georgianna Kmetz, Cindy Tuemmler & Patty Pace (Refreshments)
Charu Shridhar & Surya Sundaram (Magazine Editor & Design)
v
STudenT volunTeerS geTTing
prepped for The big nighT
vivi
gueSTS
vii
gueSTS
viii
STAff & pArenTS
ix
refreShMenTS
x
Table of Contents
STEAM night 
Video: STeAM nighT by WCTV 1
Agriculture
-  ...........................................................................
Biochemistry
:    ........................................................................
:      .......................................
:    ................................................................
:   .....................................................................................
:    - ....................................
:   .............................................................................
:    .............................................................
:     ...........................................................
:    ............................................................................
:   ..............................................................................
:   ...............................................................................
:     ................................................
:   .................................................................................
Biology
          ................................... 
   ........................................................................................... 
 :   :    ...................................................... 
  ............................................................................................. 
   ................................................................................... 
  -  .............................................................. 
     ......................................................................... 
       ......................... 
Career Technology
 :    .................................................. 
    ................................................................... 
   ................................................................... 
     .................................................. 
Chemistry
   .................................................................... 
 ...................................................................................................... 
xi
ChemARTistry
  ...................................................................................... 
  ....................................................................................... 
  ....................................................................................... 
  ....................................................................................... 
Drafting
  .............................................................................................. 
  .............................................................................................. 
Engineering
    ......................................................................................... 
    ............................................................................ 
     ......................................................... 
   ............................................................................. 
 (  ) .................................................................................. 
       ......................................... 
-   ............................................................................... 
   .......................................................................... 
-  ...................................................................................... 
     .................................................................................... 
 ......................................................................................................... 
  ........................................................................................... 
   ............................................................................. 
  .................................................................................... 
  ............................................................................................ 
’  ..................................................................................................... 
      .............................................................. 
    ............................................................................. 
Environmental Science
    ................................................... 
Healthcare
:   . ............................................................................................ 
   .... ......................................................................................... 
    ........................................................................................ 
Independent Research
   :   ........................................... 
-      ...................................... 
--       ................................. 
  ............................................................................................ 
  ........................................................................................................... 
    .................................................................................... 
xii
Language Arts
   ................................................................................................. 
Math
:    ................................................................................... 
 ......................................................................................................... 
  ............................................................................................................ 
 ............................................................................................................... 
     .......................................................................... 
     ................................................................. 
:    ..................................................................... 
  ........................................................................................................... 
   :      ................................ 
    .............................................................................. 
   ................................................................................... 
  ............................................................................................... 
  ...................................................................................................... 
’   ......................................................................... 
 :     .................................................................... 
 :    ....................................................................... 
 :    ............................................................................... 
     .............................................................................. 
      ............................................... 
  .................................................................................................... 
Physics
  ......................................................................................... 
     :   .................. 
  .......................................................................................................... 
-   ..................................................................... 
  ..................................................................................... 
Robotics
    ........................................................................ 
Video Production
    ................................................................................ 
Visual Art
   ..................................................................................... 
,  ............................................................................................. 
    .......................................................................................... 
   ..................................................................................... 
xiii
Elementary School Projects
   ..................................................................................... 
   ............................................................................ 
    ................................................................................................. 
  .................................................................................................... 
 -      ................ 
    .............................................................................................. 
    .............................................................................................. 
    ................................................................................... 
    .................................................................................. 
  ................................................................................................... 
  ........................................................................................ 
    ........................................................................................ 
   ............................................................................................. 
Video: STEAM night by WCTV
https://youtu.be/-Hl9Y_31-CQ
STEAM nighT 2016
Special thanks to Ms. Leigh Anne Kuhn, Video Productions Teacher for her dedica-
tion to cover the STEAM night with Video and Photography.
Special Thanks to the Video Productions Teacher & Wildcat TV
Self-sustaining Aquaponics
Tricia Awald, Edwin Hernandez, Sergei Kilic, and Aslan Kilic
Mrs. Nancy Williams
Wheeler FFA (Future Farmers of America)
A self-sustaining aquaponics allows for a symbiotic relationship between the strawber-
ry plants and the goldsh. As the sh excretes its waste, the pump will pump the water up
and into the soil where the plants rest and will fertilize them. The excess water will simply ow
into pea rock which lters the water keeping a clean and safe water source for the sh.
The goldsh swim freely in a fty gallon tub that lays directly underneath the tilted three feet by four
feet garden raised bed. We decided on lling the bed with ¾ soil on one side and ¼ pea rocks on the
other. This was crucial as it pertained to the need of correct weight distribution of rock to soil, as we did
not want the legs of the bed to give out. The purpose of the pea rocks and the amount of it was to al-
low the most optimal amount of surface area to grow bacteria which is vital for ltering the water.
The aquaponics was a success for the sh were able to thrive and the strawberries eventually be-
came fruit barring. We were able to learn a new approach to growing plants in an organic style.
AgriculTurE
BiochEMiSTry
HerbFest: Aloe Vera Ointment
Matthew Han
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biochemistry
Many different products can be created from the
plant, Aloe Vera. Unlike other plants/herbs, Aloe
Vera does not have one major active ingredient, but
it does contain many other important components.
These components include amino acids, enzymes,
salicylic acid, monosaccharides, and polysaccha-
rides. Aloe Vera itself does not have an essential oil,
but an oil can be created by extracting the gel of
an Aloe Vera plant and combining it with fatty acids
to synthesize an Aloe Vera oil. To extract the gel
from the Aloe Vera plant, a simple dissection of the
plant was done and the gel was able to be extract-
ed. Next, coconut oil was used, and the fatty acids
were extracted from it. Both of these processes can
be done at home, but the extraction of the fatty oil
was very difcult to do. Since there is no natural
essential oil, the synthesized oil can be used to make
many different products, even edible ones. The
products created in this project were an analgesic
skin ointment, as well as a juice for consumption.
HerbFest: Applications of Citral
and Citronellol
Eunice Lamothe
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biochemistry
Several active ingredients can be extracted from
lemongrass oil and used to produce bug repel-
lent products. Lemongrass oil must be extracted
through a process of steam distillation. This includes
using stream to force the wanted materials out of
the lemongrass in a homemade apparatus. Among
these active ingredients include molecules citral and
citronellol. Citral is an aromatic compound classi-
ed as an aldehyde and has the molecular formula
C10H16O. Citral includes two methyl groups, one
carbonyl group, and two double bonds. Two isomers
exist, geraniol and neral, and they are both pres-
ent in lemongrass but geraniol is more prominent.
Geraniol provides a lemon scent to the products.
Citronellol is an alcohol with the molecular formu-
la, C10H20O. It is very similar in structure to ci-
tral but it is more reduced. It was produced from
citral by hydrogenation. Citronellol has the power
to repel mosquitos and can be infused in different
products. Together, citral and citronellol were used
to create a citrus line of bug repellent products.
HerbFest: Applications of Vanilla
Suyash Rajesh
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biochemistry
By utilizing the active ingredient in Vanilla, every-
day products can be made. The active ingredient
of vanilla is Vanillin, which falls under the category
of phenolic aldehyde, a derivative of the aromatic
compound phenol. It consists of several functional
groups, such as an aldehyde, phenol, and an ether
functional group. The molecular formula of the
compound is C8H8O3. Vanillin is the chemical re-
sponsible for the distinct aroma and taste of vanilla.
To extract Vanillin, the process of solvent extraction
was completed. Solvent extraction consists of using
a nonpolar solvent to make a “cement” and then
using and evaporating ethyl alcohol to create what
is known as an absolute. However, the process is
long and expensive, as it can only be completed on
an industrial scale. Instead, an infusion utilizing a
carrier oil was made. By using the active ingredi-
ent present in Vanilla, beauty and care products,
such as bath bombs were synthesized. This process
was also utilized to create edible food products.
HerbFest: Aroma Doh
Lauren Newhouse
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biochemistry
Active ingredients such as gingerol, which is found
in ginger, and mint L- Carvone, commonly found
in spearmint, are substances that give each es-
sential oil its characteristics. The active ingredient
Carvone must be the “Renantiomer in order to
have a minty characteristic. The active ingredients
are vital in to distinguish the various types of es-
sential oils and their effects. By selecting a variety
of essential oils, it was possible to give each one
of my doughs different purposes and characteris-
tics. In terms of aromatherapy, each essential oil
is able to provide a unique effect to the body and
mind. By combining the substance known as ‘play
dough’ with essential oils, one can create a product
that soothes or stimulates the body. In one type of
dough, ginger and lemon essential oils were utilized
to stimulate the mind and promote positivity, while
in the other a jasmine essential was used for the
purpose of dissipating stress. In order to synthe-
size these products, a process was used to create
essential oils by combining the active ingredients
with a non-polar substance (olive oil) under high
pressure and heat to catalyze the reaction. Creating
Aroma Doh’ accomplished the goals of my project.
BiochEMiSTry
BiochEMiSTry
HerbFest: Bath and Biochemistry
Works-Eucalyptus
Robin Grazulis
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biochemistry
Eucalyptus is a versatile plant that can be used
in many ways. Its active ingredient is eucalyptol,
a terpene with the molecular formula C10H18O.
Eucalyptol can be extracted from the eucalyptus
plant and utilized as a cleaner, an herbal remedy,
an air freshener, as well as other things. Using the
process of saponication, an ‘all-natural’ soap was
synthesized using sodium hydroxide (a base) and
coconut oil (a lipid) to produce glycerol and soap.
In addition to the soap, eucalyptus candles were
synthesized by mixing eucalyptus oil with unscent-
ed candle wax. Organic eucalyptus tea was an-
other product made by steeping eucalyptus leaves
in hot water and adding clover honey and star
anise for avoring. All three products were com-
bined into a soothing stress relief package, “Bath
and Biochemistry Works”, which was the intent
of this project and successfully accomplished.
HerbFest: Blooming Baths
Parmida Jamshidi
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biochemistry
Chamomile is a daisy like plant known for its re-
laxing and soothing properties. For thousands of
years, chamomile has been used for these purpos-
es. Common uses include: sleeping aids, treatment
for colds, upset stomach and fever, and it is also
consumed as tea. Chamomile may also be used
externally to aid in rashes or as a skin treatment.
Within chamomile oil, there are three predominant
compounds: chamazulene, levomenol, and trans-
β-farnesene. The purpose of this project was to
produce bath products from chamomile oil with
the intentions that they may aid in inducing sleep
as well as provide positive skin benets. To make
the oil, heat (as well as a solar infusion method)
was used, and the resulting oils were compared to
determine the best, most effective oil. Then, the
oil was blended with other oils to make a bath oil
and used to prepare a bath bomb. These prod-
ucts were then marketed and advertised through
a brochure that was also created for this project.
HerbFest: Cinnamon Hand Sani-
tizer
Drew Mullen
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biochemistry
Cinnamon is known for its characteristic odor. Be-
cause of this, it is often used in aromatherapy. Its
essential oil also carries its scent. Cinnamaldehyde
is the active ingredient in the essential oil of cinna-
mon. This molecule gives cinnamon its distinct scent
and avor. Because cinnamaldehyde is nontoxic, it is
commonly used as an insecticide and a fungicide in
agriculture. Cinnamaldehyde contains a phenyl group
and an aldehyde group and it has the molecular
formula of C9H8O. Cinnamaldehyde can be obtained
through two ways: the steam distillation of cinna-
mon bark, which yields cinnamon oil, or through
the oxidation of cinnamyl alcohol. The process of
steam distillation was used for this project and the
collection of the essential oil was collected after
it condensed back to the liquid state. A cinnamon
hand sanitizer was created for this project because
of its distinctive scent and nontoxic properties.
HerbFest: Extracting Dye from
Beets
Drashti Zalavadia
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biochemistry
Typically, beets are associated with food and drinks.
In this project, the dye from beets was extracted
and used to create products for babies. Many of
the products available in this day and age con-
tain unnecessary chemicals that may be toxic. The
purpose of this project was to create safely-dyed
clothing and accessories for babies. The dye, from
the compound betanin, was extracted by boiling
the beets over a period of time. In order to make
the dye adhere to the fabric, a process known as
mordanting was used. This process involved sub-
merging the fabric in a solution of metal ions which
creates a bridge between the dye and the molecules
in the fabric. After both the dye and fabric were
prepped, the two were boiled together for a few
hours. The mixture was then left alone until the
desired color of the baby’s clothes was achieved.
The result of this process is a non-toxic product
that can be used for creating items for babies
without potential consequences to their health.
BiochEMiSTry
BiochEMiSTry
HerbFest: Kits for Kanines
Kseniya Spikina
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biochemistry
Some of the most important products used in our
daily lives are shampoo, conditioner, and toothpaste.
Without these essentials, it would greatly affect our
hygiene and alter our appearance. These same basic
hygiene products are also necessary for pets. While
rosemary does not contain a specic active ingredi-
ent, it does have a wide variety of chemical compo-
nents that attribute to fragrance and health benets.
In this project, rosemary oil was extracted by the
use of a slow cooker. The oil was then added to
different mixtures and solutions to create shampoo,
conditioner, and toothpaste. The process required
using plant material, in this case, rosemary leaves,
to be immersed in oil and slow cooked for a long
period of time. The steam and essential oils rise,
cool, and are collected. The product remaining is an
infused rosemary oil. A variety of products for pets,
specically canines, were then synthesized using
different ingredients and ratios with the extracted
oil. There were slight problems throughout the ex-
periment, but overall the end products achieved the
desired result and ‘Kits for Kanines’ was produced.
HerbFest: Lavender Lights
Neeraja Rajesh
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biochemistry
Lavender is a plant known for its versatility and
fragrance. Its active ingredients include the R enan-
tiomer of linalool, which is commonly called licareol,
and linalyl acetate. Linalool is a naturally occurring
terpene alcohol chemical found in plants and ow-
ers, while linalyl acetate is a naturally occurring
phytochemical found in plants and owers. Linalyl
acetate is the acetate ester of linalool, which ex-
plain why they both occur in conjunction. In order
to extract the lavender essential oil, which con-
tains 51% of linalool and 35% of linalyl acetate, a
method of steam distillation was used. Using this
method at home only required using distilled water,
the lavender herb, and a crock-pot. The lavender
was placed in a crock-pot, lled with distilled water,
and was placed on low for 24 hours. It was then
steeped for a week and the oil, with its lower densi-
ty, rose to the top. This oil was then used to create
a scent for candles. Because of its proven effects
with aiding in both relaxation and memory enhance-
ment, it was the herb chosen for this project.
BiochEMiSTry
HerbFest: Lemon Perfume
Josh Snowden
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biochemistry
Lemon trees are a species of small evergreen that is
native to Asia. The juice from lemons have a va-
riety of uses, as they are valuable to culinary and
cleaning purposes. The essential oils of lemon can
stimulate the liver and lymph activity, while also
detoxifying and energizing the body. To extract the
oils for the use of fragrance, the technique of cold
pressing was implemented. The scent is known to
have benecial effects, such as uplifting a person’s
mood and boosting the immune system. The ac-
tive ingredient that is found in lemons is citric acid,
which is also responsible for its sour taste. Citric
acid has the molecular formula C6H8O7 and has
several carboxyl groups, hence characterizing it as
an organic acid. The main product that was creat-
ed for HerbFest was a lemon perfume, as well as
making a secondary edible product, a lemon cake.
HerbFest: Peppermint Perfume of
Perfection
Chak Nulu
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biochemistry
Peppermint essential oil contains many different
active ingredients that provide characteristics to the
peppermint plant. Among these molecules, menthol
and menthone are found in a greater proportion.
Menthol has a molecular formula of C10H20O. It
is characterized as an alcohol due to the hydroxyl
group that protrudes from its cyclohexane ring. Due
to the three stereocenters that it contains, menthol
has eight possible stereoisomers ((-)-menthol being
the most abundant). It’s known to create a “cooling”
effect on the skin. Menthone provides the “minty”
aroma of the peppermint plant. With a molecular
formula of C10H18O, it’s classied as a ketone due
to the double bonded oxygen attached to the cyclo-
hexane ring. Menthone contains two stereocenters,
resulting in four stereoisomers. L-menthone is the
most abundant of the four. There are two main ways
to extract these molecules: infusion and steam dis-
tillation. One can prepare an infused oil by allowing
the molecules to diffuse into a medium, such as a
carrier oil. Steam distillation divides the plant into its
biomass and essential oil by boiling the molecules
out of the plant. Since both of these methods are
efcient and reliable, the former was used for this
project and a peppermint perfume was produced.
BiochEMiSTry
HerbFest: Rose Perfume
Parth Shah
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biochemistry
Esters are products of the esterication reaction,
which involves a condensation reaction with al-
cohols and acids. Esters are responsible for the
pleasant fragrances of jasmine, rose, lavender,
apples, and many other owers and fruits. The
two compounds which most affect the percep-
tion of the smell of roses in particular are cis-rose
oxide and beta-damascenone. These compounds
are also important constituents of the rose es-
sential oil. To make rose perfume, the essential
oil must be extracted. The best way to accom-
plish this is to use steam distillation. This pro-
cess involves introducing steam to the organic
compounds, which will then carry the vaporized
compounds to another ask where the condensed
liquids can be collected. This process is long and
requires great quantities of the particular herb for
the essential oil to be extracted. By using an al-
ternate method called oil infusion, an oil that has
similar compounds can be created, mimicking the
smell of the rose essential oil. This can then be
used to create soaps, candles, and perfumes. This
process was used to synthesize ‘Rose Perfume’,
which was my product for created for HerbFest.

Biology
A Comparison of an Animal Cell
to a Space Shuttle
Zach Yahne
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biology
The purpose of this project was to create a correla-
tion between an animal cell and a space shuttle.
This was accomplished by comparing various cell
organelles, such as the nucleus and mitochondria,
to components of a space shuttle, such as astro-
nauts or rocket boosters. The comparison was
based on the function the organelles and parts, not
their shape, size, or location. Constructed of foam,
paint, and cardboard, a physical model of a space
shuttle was created to demonstrate this analogy
of organelles to space shuttle components. The
product synthesized was approximately 3 feet long
by 2 feet wide at the base. A paper accompanied
this project that explained the analogies between
the model and the cell. This model could be used
in the future to possibly simplify understanding of
the functions of cell organelles, which would help
students understand the concepts more easily.
Cell Castle Game
Samuel Adkins
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biology
TA ‘Cell Castle’ computer game was created to
demonstrate an analogy to the cell. The castle
was an integral part of the classic RPG (role play-
ing game). As the game and story progressed, the
castle was a place where the character could take
a rest, as well as sometimes the castle was the
center of the action. This staple of video games
were much like a cell, the basic unit of life. After
much preparation and a lot of thought about how
these two seemingly unlike things were similar,
work began on a creating a game using RPG Mak-
er. While the software certainly sped up the pro-
cess, it took around 20 hours of work to produce
the nished product. Each “organelle” had its own
quest or dialog, that in some way, correlated with a
function of the cell. For example, the king was the
nucleus and the stables were the Golgi apparatus.
However, all the time commitment was worth it, as
students that played the game seemed to effective-
ly learn the functions and structures of the cell.

High School: The First Day: A Cell
Movie
Ritika Sadalge and Emily Herkert
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biology
The cell is the smallest functional unit of an organ-
ism. A video was made to show how the cell and its
organelles work together, by way of comparing it to
the rst day of school. In the video, various scenes
were made to show analogies for the different cell
organelles and their structures and functions. The
goal was to present them in a creative and enjoyable
way. The video portrayed a ninth grade student’s
rst day at school in the Wheeler Magnet Program,
and gave verbal and visual analogies of the cell
organelles that the student encountered through-
out the day. The video began as the student arrived
to school. She used the schedule she was given as
a timeline for the corresponding situations of the
typical rst day at a new school. As the student
gured out how the school worked, the analogies as
to how the cell worked could also be made. Stu-
dents, teachers, and the school building itself all
became different organelles in what critics called
the video ‘the most cyto-splitting lm of the year’.
Macro Molecule
Grace Miner
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biology
The intent of this project was to introduce students
as to how animal cell organelle structures and
functions are related. Through the use of special-
ized graphics and creative design, this was accom-
plished through the use of cartoons that were then
incorporated into a video. The name of the cartoon
series was ‘Macro Molecule’. The main charac-
ter was a macromolecule that had the powers to
shrink himself and others. His mission was to ght
and defend the cell from evil villains, which were
analogous to a cell’s foreign invaders, in order to
save the cell. During these adventures, correlations
regarding cell organelle structure and function were
emphasized. The goal of this project was to create
a different technique that could be used by teach-
ers to help their students learn about an animal
cell’s structure and function, while also demon-
strating that learning can be enjoyable and fun.
Biology

Plant Cell Newspaper
Ayush Goyal and Arul Gupta
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biology
The purpose of the ‘Cell Project’ was to formulate
a product which would effectively demonstrate
analogies regarding function and structure of each
organelle, within either a plant or animal cell. The
primary goal of this project was to create these
analogies in the form of a newspaper. Sections in
the newspaper included sports, weather, entertain-
ment, cartoons, editorials, etc. While producing
the newspaper, numerous formats utilizing differ-
ent techniques were designed until the paramount
end product design was achieved. After comple-
tion, each aspect of the project was reviewed and
compared to the project’s requirements to ensure
a unique product was attained. The outcome pre-
sented a multi-page newsprint on the same scale
as a ‘real’ newspaper, with colored fonts, pictures
and creative organization. As a nal statement, it is
believed the task was effectively accomplished and
the project showed both initiative and creativity.
Plant Cell Stop-Motion Animation
Nicholas Howcumfu
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biology
Cells are the smallest structural unit within every liv-
ing organism. Each cell contain organelles that work
in harmony to carry out every day functions, so that
the organism is able to maintain homeostasis. For
this cell project, a plant cell was compared to roles
and structures within a hospital. A stop-motion pic-
ture video was created to include various scenes of
‘Lego’ props and background scenery. The cinematic
process included adjusting the ‘legos’ in small incre-
ments of time and taking many photographs. Imag-
es of organelles were taken to show each organelle’s
structure. After over one thousand photos were col-
lected, they were inserted into Windows Movie Mak-
er for editing and processing. Pictures from each
scene were compressed into one video clip. Music
and transitions were then aligned to match the time
and position of each segment. The goals for creat-
ing a unique product for this project were attained.
Biology

White House to Animal Cell
Max Pakula
Mrs. Susan Phillips
Magnet Biology
A cell is the basic structural and functional unit of life. For this ‘Cell Analogy’ project, the animal cell and
its organelles were compared to key components in the functioning of the United States government.
This was done by way of creating a physical model of the White House. To build this model, over 50
pieces of cardboard were cut, each to specic and precise dimensions. The pieces were painted, glued,
and then adhered together to build the walls of the building. The windows, fence, and doors were mea-
sured, drawn and painted. Ofces and furniture were then added to the interior, and other elements
were added to the grounds surrounding the White House. Some of these elements were incorporat-
ed to represent a portion of the organelles. The other organelles functions were compared to the key
roles of people in the White House, such as the President and his staff. Additionally, the model included
a working chandelier and detachable roofs, so that the interior could be seen. Constructing this mod-
el helped make the complex components of a cell more understandable in terms of a real life analogy.
Biology

Biology
The Glutamate Linkage Model in Embryonic Development
Jessica Liebich, Faith Aisien, Richa Virmani, Sarah Azhar
Mr. Brian Nelson
Post AP DNA and Genetics Research Capstone Project
The crux of this experiment is using Zebrash to test the Glutamate Linkage Model of the mental dis-
order Schizophrenia and to observe how embryonic exposure to NMDA (N- methyl-D-aspartate recep-
tor) inhibiting drugs can increase chances of the offspring having a predisposition for Schizophrenia.
Research has been done on the factors involved in the development of Schizophrenia, and it has been
theorized that a shortage of a neurotransmitter, Glutamate, within the brain causes the presence of
Schizophrenia. Using the Glutamate Linkage Model of Schizophrenia as the basis of the experiment, a
predisposition for Schizophrenia was modeled. This predisposition was attempted to be induced by ex-
posing zebrash embryos to magnesium, which mimics drugs such as Ketamine and other prescrip-
tion drugs that inhibit glutamate receptors. To test whether or not embryos exposed the magnesium
will have a predisposition for schizophrenia, levels of a protein, DISC1 (Disrupted in Schizophrenia)
will be measured. This protein affects frontal cortex development, a characteristic commonly asso-
ciated with Schizophrenia. Though the experiment is still in progress, we hope to nd a statistical-
ly signicant difference in DISC1 levels, opening doors to new Schizophrenia research, and affect-
ing the future of prenatal care and the drugs prescribed as anesthetics to expecting mothers.

Biology

cArEEr TEchnology
Creating a Graphic Application
Ryan Marino
Ms. Latrice Wicker
Programming Games, Apps,
and Society Project
Computer science is one of the most far reaching
elds of study in modern times. Nearly every area
of life uses computer applications and programs.
They affect how we live, work, and play. Such
programs have the capacity to perform complex
operations with ease or even simulate real life. The
purpose of this project was to create a user-friend-
ly graphic application. The Python programming
language was used in conjunction with PyScripter,
which is an integrated development environment
used to debug and compile the code. Developing
the code that runs the application required many
mathematical operations, mainly to move objects
on the screen in particular ways. Additionally, soft-
ware such as Adobe Photoshop and Audacity were
used to create and modify the resources neces-
sary to make the application. The end result was
a fully-functioning graphic application called Apple
Catcher: a game in which a user controls a sprite
in the application to accomplish a goal. Knowledge
in many areas was obtained by creating the appli-
cation, including mathematics, graphic design, and
the programming language itself. These skills were
used in creating the application and can be extend-
ed to create applications for many other purposes.
AppInventor Game: The Gapra
Whitewoods
Allan Nguyen
Ms. Latrice Wicker
Programming Games, Apps,
and Society Project
In this world of emerging technology and with
people’s fascination of games, many tools
are available for us to develop programs. One
of the tools, AppInventor, is an open-
source web application originally provided by Google,
and now maintained by the Massachusetts Institute
of Technology (MIT). It has a block-based feature
which allows the user to create event-based code
through programming constructs. It utilizes an
Android’s functionality of their sensors. An ori-
entation sensor was used to detect angle
changes of the mobile device, this event trig-
gered code to move my character.
AppInventor’s block feature allows the user
to easily code without the syntax errors. Ap-
pInventor’s ease of use yet abundant features
was impressive and being able to create
a fun game that uses Android sensors and pro-
gramming events and control structures that is
enjoyable for everyone was a great experience.

Programming a Java Graphics
Application
Nigel Nderi
Mrs. Latrice Wicker
Programming Games Apps
and Society Project
Java is a programming language that is used
in countless applications and is installed
on billions of computers. It is used by many
professional software developers around
the world due to the relative ease of use it
provides without sacricing power. The
Integrated Development Environment, or IDE,
Intellij helps the developer in many ways
such as providing suggestions that allow the
programming to be completed quicker and
Suggests better alternatives to the code
in order to make it as efcient as
possible. My application, Super Brick Breaker,
uses java graphics, control structures such as if
statements and for loops in order to regis-
ter the ball collisions and movement. It also
implements a timer to efciently manage the
threads to maximize memory efciency and allows
two or more events to run concurrently. I learned a
lot about the Java programming language and the
standard methods used in the professional program-
ming world. This kind of knowledge can be applied
to other programming languages and lead to the de-
velopment of software that could change the world.
cArEEr TEchnology
Developing Mobile Applications
Layla Grazulis
Mrs. Latrice Wicker
Programming Games Apps
and Society Project
Mobile applications are part of everyone’s everyday
lives. Apps on our devices affect the way we think,
live, and work. Learning how to develop applications
in an academic environment not only helps the user
further understand how popular apps work, but it
also creates connections with other elds of study.
The purpose of this project was to design a com-
pletely open source application that satises one or
more categories of productivity in everyday life; to
not only provide a simple and fun app for general
users, but an educational experience for anybody
who wishes to examine the code. My applications
are built with kinetic algorithms, graphical interfaces,
and user input. Research was required in the pro-
gramming languages of Java and AI2. Programming,
creating algorithms, and understanding the funda-
mentals of software development requires extensive
knowledge in the elds of mathematics, science,
and engineering. Completing this project applied
computer programming and graphical development
in a real-world setting with relation to the common
user as well as the productivity of a programmer.

cArEEr TEchnology

chEMiSTry
Distillation of Nepetalactone
Noam Kleinman and Jonathan Shoemaker
Mr. John Cody
Chemistry

chEMArTiSTry
ChemARTistry Project

chEMArTiSTry
ChemARTistry Project
Mrs. Linda Patterson
Honors Chemistry, ChemARTistry Project
Students were introduced to how artists use chemistry principles to make their artwork. Students were
asked to construct a piece of artwork by creatively and effectively using any of the techniques studied
in class. Students prepared a typed placard describing their artwork (see below) and an essay detailing
the chemistry behind it. Areas of art included electroplating, making paints and pigments, egg dying,
chromatography, fabric dying, frescos, etc. Student work was then graded in the following categories:
Students included details about the materials, techniques required, color, shape, size, texture, as well as
what the inspiration was for their artwork. Finally, they were asked to describe the human connection to
their artwork such as: did it have a function, create a mood, represent the artist, a culture or time period,
inspire an emotion or have a purpose. Templates for display of the art had the following information:
(Name of Piece)
(Student Name)
(Intent of Piece)
(Media/Techniques Used)
Projects were created for both the fall and spring semester of the 2015 -2016 school year.
ARTWORK
Creativity, Expression, Effort 10%
Procient Use of Techniques 30%
Human Connection / Function 10%
PLACARD
Description of Your Artwork 10%
Explanation of Techniques 30%
Chemistry & Art Connection 10%

chEMArTiSTry
ChemARTistry Project

chEMArTiSTry

chEMArTiSTry
ChemARTistry Project

chEMArTiSTry

DrAfTing
Drafting Proj-
ects

DrAfTing
Drafting Proj-
ects

EnginEEring
3D Printed Lego Piece
Andrew Garwacke
Mr. Sergio Corvalan
Foundations of Engineering
As 3D printing becomes increasingly affordable,
more people are beginning to benet from them.
A large group of people who could prot from 3D
printing technology are people who make buildings
with Lego, and want a specic part but can get it
because it hasn’t been produced. The objective of
this project is to create a CAD of a Lego piece seen
in a comic book that was never made into an actu-
al piece, and put it on a Shapeways shop so that
any Lego fan can get their hands on it. The CAD
of the Lego piece was made on Autodesk Inventor,
and can be printed out in a wide variety of mate-
rials from Shapeways.com. Near the start of Q2
2016, the nished model, along with several oth-
er side projects, will appear on a Shapeways store,
and will be available for anyone to buy. The nal
model has received only praise from the select Lego
fans allowed to see it before its public release. It
was learned that when 3D modeling, one must have
the most precise measurements possible, because
if even .001mm are off, your piece may not t.
Average Output and Specific
Impulse of Current Rocket
Technology
Ishan Chadha a nd Yash Roygaga
Mr. Sergio Corvalan
Foundations of Engineering
Prevailing rocket technologies revolve around com-
bustion of different chemicals in various ratios,
which could be replaced by rocket engines that uti-
lize ionic thrust or photon sails. This rocket was the
rst step in researching fuel efciency for numerous
fuels that could serve as alternatives to current fu-
els. The hypothesis was substantiated by testing
a rocket comprised of white powder for fuel, kit-
ty litter to act as an adherent, and a 5” long PVC
body. The white powder mixture had a 65:35 po-
tassium nitrate: powdered sugar fuel ratio. This
was attached to a spring with constant, k = 27.27
N/m, which was attached to a 20 lb. weight. Af-
ter that, a marker was attached the rocket using
a piece of adhesive tape, which would draw along
some measuring tape as the rocket moved forward.
It was determined that the total output force was
approximately 3.38 N, and the specic impulse was
around 125 seconds, which is a decent efciency
for a rocket fuel. In order for something such as
the photon sail to be as efcient, it was conclud-
ed that the engine would need to have a very high
specic impulse due to its low propellant mass.

Bluetooth Hearing Assisted
Device (Proof of Concept)
Abigail Ochal
Mr. Sergio Corvalan
Foundations of Engineering
This project was created to lower cost option for
students with hearing loss. Approximately 1 in 50
people under the age of 18 are affected by a form
of hearing loss, and would benet from a system
that would ease learning. I have unilateral hear-
ing loss, which means I can only hear out of my
right ear. Recently, I visited my audiologist, and
she presented some hearing aid options speci-
cally for unilateral hearing loss patients. I decided
to try out a system that includes two small ear-
pieces that sit behind the ear and transfer sound
from one ear to the other. I really liked the idea
of this system and the fact that it was very dis-
crete, but the quality of sound was poor, giving
a lot of static, and picking up more background
noise than anyone’s voice. I hope to further devel-
op this system into a product that is easily acces-
sible to all kinds of students with hearing loss!
EnginEEring
Robotic Gripper Controlled by
EMG Muscle Sensors
Madeleine Ochal
Mr. Sergio Corvalan
Foundations of Engineering
Surgeons upon many medical occupations often-
times struggle during intricate tasks that require a
steady hand and a ne tight grip on objects. There
are many products on the market that offer a solu-
tion to this problem. A basic idea of a product was
created so that the problem is solved without put-
ting a large hole in your wallet. This product is a
very precise gripper that has small pieces that are
easy to maneuver with just the movement of your
muscles. This product will help medical professionals
perform surgeries or other tasks with more pre-
cision and accuracy, therefore eliminating errors.
This works by analyzing the quantity of the electric
current produced when the user moves their mus-
cles. The input of electricity varies from keeping
your arm in a resting state to moving your muscles.

EnginEEring
Hand-Crank Phone Charger
Max Pakula
Mr. Sergio Corvalan
Engineering
Every year in the United States, millions of people
go without power due to natural disasters. This can
leave many without having access to the Internet
or their cell phones because they have no charge
left in their devices. This would inhibit them from
contacting family or emergency personnel for help
since many households do not have home phones
that continue to work during outages. To solve
this problem and others like it, a device was de-
signed that allows anyone to charge their phone
(or any other device that uses a USB charger) by
hand with a portable hand-crank phone charger.
To build the prototype, a hand-crank ashlight
was taken apart and re-wired to charge a porta-
ble battery rather than power the light bulbs. As
the crank turns, it spins a magnetic motor that
pulls and pushes the electrons and creates and
electric current, which charges a portable bat-
tery. After doing research on phone chargers and
crank- ashlights, and after many hours of trial and
error, the prototype nally worked. A better un-
derstanding of electronics was developed by the
researcher as a result of working on this project.
Perfect Prosthetic Movement
Grace Miner
Mr. Sergio Corvalan
Foundations of Engineering
The purpose of this engineering design process was
to determine a way in which prosthetics could be
made at a cheaper price. I also wanted to improve
the design of prosthetics overall. In a lot of prosthet-
ics, moveable ankles are not an option, but I wanted
to make that a standard procedure. By using muscle
contractions, people using my prosthetic can move
the ankle as they walk. The average prosthetic is
between $5,000 and $50,000; therefore only about
20% of people can afford them. Lowering the price
of prosthetics is especially important for kids since
they generally need a new prosthetic each year.
Even if a patient has stopped growing, they will still
need to replace there prosthetic every 5 years. This
is why making cheaper yet better quality prosthet-
ics is important for people in their daily lives. My
prosthetic was approximately $200 to build. Using
cheaper, yet high quality materials, it will be possi-
ble for more people to get the device they need.

Pressure-Sensing Stent
Rucha Gharpure
Mr. Sergio Corvalan
Foundations of Engineering
The coronary stent is an innovative device designed
by biomedical engineers to restore blood ow in
patients with Heart Disease, the number one cause
of death in America. Although the stent saves many
lives, twenty percent of the patients with stents
need further surgery due to its failures, including
restenosis. In hemodynamics, the resistance of a
liquid in a tube relates to the radius of the tube;
even the smallest change in radius causes a great
increase in resistance. Depending on the radius of
the artery, blood can either have a benign, laminar
ow or turbulent ow, which is characterized by high
velocity and chaotic blood ow. Unlike other mod-
els, the pressure-sensing stent has a drug coating
to prevent scar tissue formation after insertion. In
addition, this model contains a pressure sensor and
a PA-C40 transmitter that will be placed inside the
arterial wall to detect blood ow. If turbulent ow
in sensed, a mechanism in the stent will expand the
artery’s diameter. If successful, the pressure-sensing
sent will prevent patients from redeveloping a blood-
clot and having to go through further surgeries.
EnginEEring
RC Car Combined with a
Quadcopter
Chico Dermenzhiev and Ivan Alkhovik
Mr. Sergio Corvalan
Foundations of Engineering
Vehicles provide people with entertainment and pur-
pose. Adults use cars to drive themselves anywhere
they want to go while children play with radio-con-
trolled cars and quadcopter. But what would happen
to the history of vehicles if two different vehicles,
a quadcopter and a car, were combined into one
which has the properties of both vehicles. To begin
this journey, one must rst receive the necessary
equipment to assemble the hybrid vehicle. For both
vehicles, assemblage requires motors, electronic
speed controllers (ESC), a transmitter and receiver,
a ight controller (for the quadcopter), and a frame.
The assembling process begins with the receiver. In
a quadcopter, the ight controller is to the receiv-
er, and the ESC are wired to the ight controller.
In the car, the ESC are wired to the receiver. Then,
the ESC are wired to the motors, one ESC is wired
to the battery. These connected parts are put into
a frame. In the end, the combination of parts will
create a vehicle which has the properties of a quad-
copter and a car, meaning it can drive and y.

EnginEEring
Electric Longboard
Amanda Firestone
Mr. Sergio Corvalan
Engineering
Electric longboards are the newest craze among celebrities; people love this gyroscopic transportation
method. The large wheels of a longboard are easier to control and the large surface area makes mounting
easy. There are holes in the timing pulley and washers to mount them to the wheel with screws. The most
important part of the build process was choosing the electronics. The two 7.4V lipo batteries are connected
in series; they give power to the electronic speed controller to turn it on. The motor is attached, along with
the Arduino connected to the BEC. The power switch on the ESC starts up the system. The next process
was learning to program an Arduino. After four iterations, the nal Arduino code was split into 12 different
libraries, each of which call to others in order to function. The Wii Remote works by Bluetooth connection

EnginEEring
Digital Metronome
Amara Holland
Mr. Michael Fusia
Foundations of Electronics
Digital metronomes are used regularly in all music
classes. Metronomes use clicks accompanied by
visual aids such as blinking lights to help musicians
keep time while playing a piece. My digital metro-
nome was broken down in a very simplistic way. A
breadboard was used to prototype the digital metro-
nome. A speaker was wired in series with the LED’s
to provide the clicks, or beats. A 555 timer and a
Decade Counter were used to create and send the
pulses throughout the circuit to create the consis-
tent ashes and clicks. A potentiometer, a variable
resistor, was used to change the speed of the clicks
and ashes to create the different tempos that a
musician might need. The metronome needed to
be customized from a previous designed and re-
search on the individual components needed to be
done to create the desired effect. I used the sche-
matic diagram as a road map for where everything
goes and how to put it together. In the end, the
purpose and function of the 555 timer and decade
counter as well as soldering and building techniques
helped me create this personalized metronome.
Mechanical Performance in
Additive Manufacturing
Shashwat Kasturey
Valerie Bolen
Independent Study/
Additive Manufacturing and
Continuum Mechanics
The analysis examines the additive manufacturing
process as it relates to industrial applications, pro-
totypical industrial design, and issues concerned
with mechanical performance. Models are manu-
factured using an UPrint FDM Machine in high-den-
sity ABS plastic. Using Autodesk Fusion 360 and
Autodesk Inventor, prototyped objects including
a wing structure and an arched bridge are placed
under load and examined through a Design Failure
Mode and Effect Analysis. The objects are virtual-
ly stress-tested through FEA in static and dynamic
conditions to attain data on anisotropic mechani-
cal properties. Structural and mesh properties are
altered to simulate distinct differences in product
fabrication. Lattice mesh prototypes are tested
in contrast with prototypes that are constructed
through layers of deposition. Using a typical, Von
Mises stress analysis allows for the simulation of
deection under load and the diagnosis of poten-
tial failure modes. The data and failure modes are
then analyzed and extrapolated to pose a discus-
sion on issues that are inherent to additive pro-
cesses in modern manufacturing. The Von Mises
stress analysis yielded higher deection value (31%
greater on average) for components “fabricated”
through an additive processes. Objects construct-
ed in a lattice or through virtual methods showed
a greater tendency to yield under lateral load and
a 22.3% greater tendency to experience shear.

EnginEEring
Jacobs ladder
Alex Mayfield
Professor Orren Williams
Engineering
This project was created to illustrate the properties
of electricity. The materials used for this project
included a neon sign transformer, 8 gauge copper
wire, plywood, and plexiglass acrylic sheets. The
neon sign transformer was connected to a wall
outlet, which gave right electrode a voltage of 15kV.
The left electrode was grounded. The large volt-
age potential between the two electrodes created
an arc between the two electrodes. This amount
of voltage was needed to overwhelm the dielec-
tric coefcient of air. The arc heated up the air
around it. The hotter air is, the higher the dielectric
constant, which means that it conducts electrici-
ty much more easily. Demonstrating this, the arc
moves upward between the two electrodes until
it “snaps” where the electrodes end. The plywood
and plexiglass were used to create a safe box, as
both are insulators to electricity, and both block UV
light, which can be created by arcs of electricity.
The Mechanics of a Combination
Lock
Sneha Divan
Professor Orren Williams
Engineering Applications
Combination locks seem extremely complicated;
however, the basic internal mechanism is actually
very simple. The number of discs corresponds with
the number of input values and the discs catch on
pegs to turn. To prove the simplicity of a three-disc
lock system and to test the effects that another
disc has, a four-disc homemade lock was designed.
Each of the separate parts was designed in Au-
todesk Inventor, and the discs were cut from wood
using the CNC machine. Each of the discs had two
notches carved into them, one of which was lled
to make pegs. Besides the rod around which the
discs rotated, all other parts were 3D-printed with
a MakerBot 2 machine. These include the front and
back panels, spacers, and the dial. Once the lock
was assembled, it became clear that, although the
function was very similar to a three-disc lock, the
typical two turns right, one left, and a partial turn
right formula would not work, because all of the
disks would not engage. Instead, it requires three
turns right, two left, one right, and a partial turn
left. A major learning point of this project was the
idea of tolerances required when 3D-printing parts.

EnginEEring
The Amazing Amphibious Car
Abigail Kimber
Professor Orren Williams
Engineering Applications
Amphibious cars can benet the lives of people around the world in that they increase the num-
ber of routes on which people can travel. This shortens travel routes and is less expensive in the
long run. Also, amphibious cars allow people to escape more quickly during water-related natural di-
sasters. A model was created that resembles and displays the components of an amphibious car in
that it contains a smooth underside for gliding across water and a propeller that pushes the car for-
ward on water. A snorkel is connected to the air intake of the gas engine in order to ensure that the
engine can still intake air from above the car. Research was conducted on engineering topics such
as how different propulsion systems contribute to an amphibious car’s ride on water. Physics con-
cepts such as ramp tilt required for a model car to accelerate into a tank of water were utilized in this
project. The creation of this project has shown that certain factors must be considered when build-
ing an amphibious car that do not play a role in the construction of common water vehicles.

EnginEEring

EnginEEring

EnginEEring

EnginEEring

EnvironMEnTAl SciEncE
Pollution Watershed Model Demonstration
Pablo Aquirre, Javier Santiago Cancel, Jennifer Kim, Kimberly Paula, Blenda
Tavares Silva , and Anna Carollina Souza
Ms. Patsy Kraj
Environmental Science
Presentation and demonstration of sources of watershed pollution. Pollution followed from the point of
contamination through the end accumulation. Possible solutions, corrections, and ways to lessen pol-
lution were discussed during the presentation. This is important to achieving a sustainable world.

hEAlThcArE
EMR: The Apneic Pt.
Makda Mulugeta & Anuja Mehta
Ms. Sharon Hunt
Emergency Medical Responder
Emergency Medical Responders are specially trained professionals who provide prehospital care to
trauma and medical crises. One of these scenarios may involve an apnic patient, a person who is un-
able to breathe. There are a series of protocols and steps to follow to ensure that the patient is sta-
ble before being taken to the medical center. The rst and foremost precautions any EMR should take
is making sure the scene is safe and putting on proper body substance isolation items such as gloves
and N95 masks. In order to properly demonstrate this skill, we needed an airway manikin, oropha-
ryngeal and nasopharyngeal airways, a mechanical suction device, a bag-valve mask, and an oxy-
gen tank. To mimic a patient who may aspirate on their stomach contents, we also had to synthe-
size vomitus and pump it in the manikin’s stomach. All of these materials and our prior knowledge
were applied to efcaciously demonstrate how an EMR would assess and treat an apneic patient.

hEAlThcArE
Spot a Stroke F.A.S.T. Spot a Stroke F.A.S.T.

hEAlThcArE
A Medical Case Study
William Cooper
Ms. Sharon Hunt
Essentials of Healthcare Project
For this project, a sixty-one year old male patient with chest pain and a chief complaint of shortness
of breath entered the emergency department. I had to research the symptoms, diagnostic tests, and
treatments of the given condition and create a PowerPoint presentation, written in medical shorthand,
showing how the patient would go through the medical system with said condition. His past medical his-
tory revealed that he was positive for type 2 diabetes and hypertension and that symptoms came on
suddenly after a long plane ride. After being monitored by an electrocardiogram and being put on oxy-
gen, a comprehensive history was taken and review of systems was performed. The physical exam re-
vealed that the patient had a fever, breathed laboriously, and had a weak pulse. Also, the patients skin
was cyanotic and diaphoretic, and the patient had asymmetric chest rise and diminished breath sounds
in the left upper quadrant. After several diagnostic tests, including a chest X-ray, the patient was diag-
nosed with a pulmonary embolism, which is a condition where the patient has a clot in one of his or her
pulmonary arteries, and he was given 100mg of Alteplase in a normal saline solution intravenously.
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hEAlThcArE
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Cobb County Police Department: Entering Autos
Christy Litz
Dr. Berkemeier and Dr. Maloney
Advance Internship and Research
The purpose of this study is to identify the factors that affect the rate of entering automobiles (EA) in
Cobb County. Information provided by the Cobb County Police Department conrmed that there has
been an increase in entering autos over the past four years. As people become more dependent on
their portable technology, they commute with it daily, often leaving the electronics in the car, mak-
ing it very vulnerable to being entered. Shift change times were compared to the number of EAs that
occurred each year to see if there were any peaks. The results are as follows: There was no relation-
ship between a particular shift change and a peak of EAs and EAs tended to gather not around ar-
eas of mass transit, but those in proximity to major roads and highways. Victimology is the study
of the relationship between the victim, crime, and criminal. American-made cars were the most fre-
quently entered, but electronics were not the most often stolen. The data suggests that items sto-
len were based solely on opportunity. Overall, the study shows that the growth of technology, the
time of day, proximity to highways, and the car manufacturer all affect the rate of entering autos.
inDEpEnDEnT rESEArch
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Three-Dimensional Printing of a Mechanical Watch
Ajinkya Sawant
Dr. Kathleen Maloney
Applications of Engineering Independent Project
Humanity has seen amazing developments in the eld of horology; our need for accurate time has
fostered incredible strides in watchmaking. Timekeeping has morphed from sundials, to pendulum
clocks, to mechanical watches, to quartz watches, all the way to the atomic clock. The rst mechan-
ical watches were designed in the 15th century, and they have progressively become more accurate.
The purpose of this project was to test the feasibility of designing and creating a watch movement
via CAD and three-dimensional printing. First, extensive research was conducted to ensure the phys-
ics and gear-ratios between parts were correct. The movement was designed with online blueprints in
Autodesk Inventor, rendered in Keyshot 5, and printed with a Stratasys uPrint printer. After adjusting
the tolerances on all 40 miniature parts, the watch was ready for assembly. Using a soldering iron, the
parts were fused together to form a moving model of a proper watch. The nal product was not func-
tioning because an operational movement would require metal coils. Nevertheless, it is possible for one
to manually move the winding screw and see the parts move in tandem with each other. Therefore,
one can produce a functioning mechanical watch with a 3D printer as long as a coil is tted onto it.
inDEpEnDEnT rESEArch

inDEpEnDEnT rESEArch
Proof-of-Concept and Influences of a Postmodern Film
Shreyas Casturi
Dr. Kate Maloney
Audio/Video, Engineering Applications
Film encompasses numerous ideas, themes, and storytelling paradigms. Some lms use certain themes
and ideas to provide subtext for the story. There is a philosophical discipline known as postmodernism; this
discipline revolves around the nature of truth, perception, time, and language. The purpose of this project
was to create a proof-of-concept for a theoretical postmodern lm. First, a rough treatment dealing with
general plot points was created. Secondly, a list of inuences from various books, television shows, mov-
ies, and directors was collated. After that, the Microsoft software Sway was used to create a presentation
that synthesized the literary, technical and lmic inuences on the lm. In addition, the presentation fea-
tured an explanation of the general plot and analysis of the themes below the surface of the lm. Plans are
underway to make this project an actual reality; that is, to make an actual lm. This is just the beginning.

inDEpEnDEnT rESEArch
Infinity Snowflake
Elijah Harp, Avni Sawant, Sejal Patel, Mariah Butts, Benjamin Holmes, Shayan
Boghani
Dr. Kate Maloney, Mrs. Kelly Karr, Mr. Stillwell
Independent Project
The Innity Snowake is the ultimate combination of engineering and art. Starting with a concept and
continuing on to construction, aesthetics as well as structural feasibility were kept in mind. The display is
constructed of a large four foot by four foot mirror that was layered with a symmetric wooden outline of
a snowake. The shape of the snowake was determined by examining fractals in nature and their re-
peating patterns. Another piece of glass was overlaid with window tint, making the glass into a one way
mirror. Along the inner outline of the wood, was an LED strip that alternated colors to form the appealing
image of a geometric snowake. Computer Aided Design was used for the measurements of the design.
Engineering concepts and models were necessary for the frame’s support and mirror. The artistic aspect
of the snowake was needed for the overall illusion of a snowake continuing backwards for innity.
Radio JOVE
Zach Eljiche
Dr. Kate Maloney
Foundations of Engineering
To begin, RADIO JOVE is a project created by NASA to educate young people by creating radio tele-
scopes to observe Jupiter or the Sun. However, my purpose of taking on this project is not only to
learn about radio astronomy, but also about electricity and the fundamentals of creating a function-
ing circuit. The circuit performs a few different functions in order to “clean” the sound received. Ju-
piter’s very weak radio frequency (RF) signals have to be translated to an audible range, and then
made loud enough to be heard by the human ear. The sound is also ltered several times in order
to get rid of extra static/unnecessary sound. In order to build this receiver, I had to follow a planned
course of action, involving identifying parts and soldering components together. Once built, however,
Jupiter was not optimal to view because of its location during March. Thankfully, the Sun is also ob-
servable with the receiver, so I observed it as an alternative. To conclude, I have taken away many
skills sets as well as a foundation in electrical engineering from this experience. In addition to this,
I have been able to experience the Engineering Design Process rst-hand through self-discovery.

Formula One in Schools
Ari Satinoff, Sarfaraz Syed, Ajinkya Sawant, Nathanael Tappin,
Jonathan Shoemaker, Virinchi Puligundla
Dr. Kate Maloney
Engineering, Physics, Team Mu Racing
F1 in Schools is an international engineering competition where teams have to design, manufacture, test,
and race model Formula One cars. Teams are judged based on six subsections: scrutineering, design and
engineering, enterprise, marketing, presentation, and racing. The F1 cars were designed on Autodesk
Inventor and tested using Autodesk CFD Flow. The cars were milled out of foam blocks using a Denford
CNC mill and tested using a wind tunnel. The CFD and wind tunnel results were utilized to improve the
body shape which, in turn, increased the speed. In addition, we also tested basic shapes in the wind tun-
nel to determine which design is the most aerodynamic. From the testing, we determined that at low
speeds the cone is the most aerodynamic. For this reason, our car design is based on the shape of a cone.
walk and how we can best determine how we can change overground walking therapy to help them.
inDEpEnDEnT rESEArch
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inDEpEnDEnT rESEArch

lAnguAgE ArTS
The Poetry Bots
Ari Matthew Sklar, Shashwat Kasturey, James Ellis, Lucas Greb
Mrs. Dejla Todoric
Honors American Literature and Composition
The Poetry bot references the Datamuse API (application program interface) and draws associations
between words to construct poems with reasonable consistency. It constructs limericks, haikus, son-
nets, and a variety of other poems based on syllabic count and poetic form. The UI (user interface)
consists of options to output individual, distinct forms of common poetry. The user is given the op-
tion to choose theme and structure and the bot does the rest. The development of this computer
program was handled through github, a collaborative space for software projects, and it effective-
ly blends the structural and technical aspects of poetry with the complexity and pragmatic appli-
cations of Java. The bot is a coalescence of concepts from both Language Arts and computer sci-
ence, effectively associating and combining techniques from English composition and science.

MATh
Dope Cups
Udochukwu Eze and Rohan George
Mr. Jeff Kent
AP Statistics
Probability is all around us. From the choices we
make to the events that happen in our everyday
lives, probability tells how likely a scenario will occur.
Dope Cups is a project we made for our AP Statis-
tics class to show the role of probability in games.
We wanted to make a game that was educational
yet fun. We decided to make a spinoff of a college
game. We used red cups and designed a small game
board. Using a drawer, we made a main stand, and
we designed a backboard out of paper. Then we
got a ping-pong ball, and we were all set. We then
calculated the different probabilities for winning the
game and displayed them on a probability tree. The
response to our game was tremendous. People were
asking to play and they never got tired of it. The
most excited bunch were the children. Overall, the
game was a huge success. Visitors enjoyed the ex-
perience and loved learning about the math behind
throwing a ball into a cup. Probability is all around
us, and we really should take a closer look at it.
Haley Bufka, Aliyah Auerbach, &
Reynold Kao
Mr. Jeff Kent
AP Statistics
In a common board game, there are various ele-
ments that are left up to random chance, or proba-
bility which frustrates some players that want games
to be left up to skill. However, despite the elements
of random chance and probability that can occur in a
board game, there are still strategies to get the best
results and turn the odds in their favor. To demon-
strate this, Bananananza was created for players to
choose what games of probability they want to en-
gage in for the highest payoff. The game itself was
constructed with various dices and the game board
was adapted from an old Monopoly™ board, with
the theme centered around the Minions featured in
Despicable Me. Players would roll dice to advance
and choose their actions on their landed space,
with all of the players trying to attain the winning
amount of bananas, the game’s scoring device. It
was found that over time, players would try to ac-
cumulate bananas in a safe method and then try to
swiftly end the game. Despite Bananananza having
well over 10 sources of probability, players can still
choose the best method to win, showing that in
games of probability one should choose better odds.
Bananananza: A Game of
Probability

Hole in Fun Probability Games
Thiago Degrossi, Emma Heinze, & Vivian
Pritts
Mr. Jeff Kent
AP Statistics
This AP Statistics assignment was to design a pack-
aged, ready-to-play game that displayed elements
of and encouraged users to predict the probability of
their winnings. Our group designed a golf-inspired
game that encouraged players to consider the prob-
ability of their winnings before making each shot.
To create this game we modied an indoor putting
green by adding lines from which the player could
putt. The game also comes with a putter, colored
golf balls, instructions, and scorecards. Players rst
roll a dice to determine the line from which they will
putt. After, they randomly select a colored golf ball
that may give them a score bonus at the end of the
round. Before putting, the player will predict the
amount of points they will score during the round. If
this number is predicted correctly, the players earn
bonus points at the end of the round. Finally, the
player will earn a point value of 5 or 0, depending
on whether their shot is a hole in one. In the end,
we found that this game provided players with a fun
way to discover how statistics impacts everyday life.
MATh
GUMDOR
Kyle Wicker, Nikhil Jindia
Mr. Jeff Kent
AP Statistics
For the steam symposium, my partner and I created
a game entitled GUMDOR. When creating “GUM-
DOR, we wanted to make sure that the game was
both intellectually challenging and rewarding for
people of all ages. We feel we accomplished this
goal based on the satisfaction shown by our par-
ticipants. The materials used in the project were:
a gumball machine, different color gumballs, a pill
box, and Lindor chocolates. The method/logic be-
hind our project is quite simple, you guess a color
gumball and if that color comes out of the gum-
ball machine, you can move on to the next round
in which you will guess which slot of the pill box
contains a Lindor chocolate. The odds of winning
the game (guessing the correct color gumball and
Lindor chocolate) were less than 1% making the
game next to impossible to win. The results of our
project were as expected. None of the participants
who played our game won (received a gumball
and Lindor chocolate) and only 2 of the partici-
pants guessed the correct color gumball on their
rst try. All in all, our game was a success, it blew
the minds of many adults and disappointed lots of
children by not allowing them to receive a gumball.

MATh
Senioritis: Statistics Board Game
Emma Briley & Kendall Krause
Mr. Jeff Kent
AP Statistics
Board games like Monopoly and LIFE are a blend of
skill and chance. These games are interesting be-
cause of the way they blend probability into strat-
egy. The purpose of this project was to design a
board game that combined risks and rewards in a
way that was predictable using statistics. The game
created, Senioritis, is presented on a trifold board
and was constructed using cardboard, construction
paper, and printer paper using basic craft tools such
as glue, scissors, and coloring tools. The game was
sketched and planned statistically before it was
constructed. Senioritis includes a statistic-based
“strategy guide” which outlines the probabilities of
more than ten specic outcomes for when a play-
er is faced with a decision. Additionally, it required
artistic knowledge to design and create. Through
the production of Senioritis it was learned how to
make specic decisions based on the likelihood of
a specic payout. It was also observed that proba-
bility is a subtle contributor to numerous aspects of
daily life, and appears where you may not expect it.
Lords of Larelith Probability
Game
Jayson Cary, Jeffery Kelsch, Gautham
Ravichandran, & Kevin Vettickat
Mr. Jeff Kent
AP Statistics
‘Lords of Larelith’ was a board game developed by
four sophomores in order create an application of
the probability formulas that were obtained in an
Advanced Placement Statistics class. The board
game was designed with the intention of allowing
players to enjoy a long and fullling game while still
thinking and calculating the best route to one, beat
the game and two, obtain the most points to be
crowned champion. The foundation for the game’s
creation was the classical Dungeons and Drag-
ons Tabletop Role Playing Game but board game
style. Probabilities were implemented to balance
the game and make the odds of winning possible
but not too easy. The materials used in creating
the physical components of this game include a
Styrofoam board, cardboard boxes, construction
paper, electrical tape, poster board, and laminated
sheets of paper. Since it was necessary to imple-
ment creativity in the box design, it was decided
that the box would resemble collapsible, rectangular
treasure chest. A strategy guide and basic proba-
bilities sheet were provided to get players started
in this somewhat-complex game. In the end, the
game looked both aesthetically pleasing and fun
to play, which it was as it was voted ‘Best Game.

Super Spin
Ada Dildar, Carter Gooch, Jeet Kothari,
Shrey Nagnur, Vivek Pai
Mr. Jeff Kent
AP Statistics
The purpose of this project was to give a simple
simulation of how math and strategy can be used to
win certain games of chance. By certain, it means
that the games need a little strategy to them, oth-
erwise there is no math to it. An example of a game
with no strategy would be a game with an equal
spinner, meaning the probability of all spots are
equal. In the scenario of the project, the math can
be applied to choose the correct type of outcome
for the spinner. However, math can also be applied
to other games of chance such as card games be-
cause the probability of an outcome increases with
every card dealt. To produce an unequal spinner in
which strategy and chance were both components,
the spinner has 5 red and 3 black spaces; there
are also numbers on each space, making 8 num-
bers. Each player gets three spins and gets a cer-
tain payout depending on what they bet the spin-
ner to land on and the number of spins they were
correct on; the manual has probabilities for each
possible outcome. In conclusion, math and strate-
gy can be used to win certain games of chance.
The Game of Wheeler: A Statisti-
cal Game of Probability
Delaney Rickles, Kaimi Story, Christy
Litz, & Mezi Mulugeta
Mr. Jeff Kent
AP Statistics
Probability is the measure of the chance that an
event will occur. Outside of the classroom, this sta-
tistical concept applies to all aspects of life, from the
possibility of catching the bus to the chance of win-
ning the lottery. This project examined the probabil-
ity of graduating high school through a board game.
The purpose of this project was to give as many dif-
ferent results as possible of graduating, while going
through various high school experiences. The board
game was designed in a simple four-player format
with a spinner to decide which homeroom a player
starts at. The spaces to move forward and backward
are the four homeroom teachers’ faces, movement
through which a spin of the spinner also determines.
Some spaces allowed for the player to take a card,
with random situational positives or negatives (for
example, “Caught without a pass! Go back to home-
room”). The cards, the spaces, and the spinner
serve to increase the multitude of probable results
and alternate chances of graduation. It was learned
that understanding probability takes more than
knowing the denition; much factors into how the
chances come about and what inuences the future.
MATh

MATh
The Gradebook Game Board
Monica Klinkmueller, Lexie Newhouse,
Grace Maloney, & Dorsa Pahlevankhah
Mr. Jeff Kent
AP Statistics
Throughout history, games have been a viable
form of entertainment for all ages. Incorporating
statistics into a board game provides a unique
opportunity to integrate probability and fun into a
universal portal for all audiences to grasp a better
understanding of the mathematics behind games of
chance. With “The Gradebook,a board game in-
spired by the classic “Shoots and Ladders,” players
(in this case students) left their grades to chance.
Each player was allowed ve coin ips, where
Heads represented one step forward and Tails
represented two steps forward. After numerous
trials, the odd-numbered lanes expressed a higher
likelihood of students passing. The results, or the
“grade,a player received from the game highly
depended on which pathway the player chose and
the combination of heads and tails from their coin
ips. This project showcases how a variety of com-
binations and the probability of those combinations
can be relevant in everyday situations like board
games, and how even certain strategies cannot
fully determine the outcome of a game of chance.
Traveling with Twister
Probability Game
Amy Lynch, Pariia Rabbanifard, Isabella
Luna, Naomi Dudas
Mr. Jeff Kent
AP Statistics
Board games are a fun and common way in which
an average person may use statistics. The purpose
for this project was to create our own statistics
based board game. The game has many different
outcomes, and the expected values and probabil-
ities for each are correctly calculated. The project
materials used include a Twister mat customized
with drawn continents. In addition, a custom-made
spinner was made through various arts and crafts
means. Trinkets that represented the six continents
were also used in order to make the game a win or
lose scenario. The basic principle of the game served
as inspiration for a more complex and probability
based game of Twister in which there were random-
ized outcomes. Calculations required the use of a
TI-84 plus C Calculator. The four columns of differ-
ent color dots, the six continents, and the spinner
increased the amount of outcomes. A main strategy
used by players was to land on the continent they
desired to travel to. The player would land there in
hopes that it would match the trinket they blindly
picked out of the bag. In conclusion, we learned
how to nd the probability of complex outcomes.

Flying Colors
Arundhati (Ammu) Kumar, Hunter Allen,
Krithika Karunakaran
Mr. Jeff Kent
AP Statistics/Senior Project,
Probability, Engineering
Probability, one of the premier ways to measure
the outcomes of an event, describes the chance of
any certain outcome occurring and we can use this
to see if a trial is biased or has a source of error.
This probability game required players to consider
various combinations of outcomes that were pos-
sible and included a point system for answers to
statistics-based questions. The game included a
6-colored grid with 36 squares (each with a spe-
cic point value), a catapult, and a dime to launch
from the catapult. The objective was to answer
the questions correctly and then earn the points
from the square landed on. Game design also in-
cluded engineering research about the best type of
catapult to build for the project. The game design
required concepts of skew, bias, randomness and
variability. At the end of our project, we saw how
many different variables go into eliminating bias
and how its extremely difcult to curtail the effect
of those variables. Through our research, we were
also able to see how statistics has great real-world
impact and can inuence almost any subject eld.
MATh
Verizons Misleading Statistics
Domenick Adrian Thomas
Mr. Jeff Kent
Statistical Reasoning
With global awards and state wins for phone call
quality, Verizon has been ranked higher than Sprint,
AT&T, and many more. But do you think that Verizon
has always told the truth to consumers in advertis-
ing? This project examined whether Verizon’s quoted
statistics were misleading in one of its most famous
commercials: “A Story told by Colorful Balls”. For
this process I dived into Verizon’s “Colorful Balls”
commercial to nd out if all the information they
explained were true. I compared Verizon’s claimed
data to statistics that were on Rootmetrics.com.
The results that I discovered were surprising. The
information provided from Verizon’s commercial
were statistics from early 2015, but the commercial
itself was released in early 2016. Using outdated
data is misleading in and of itself because metrics
can change quickly. Even more misleading was the
fact that Verizon did not properly represent their
competitors (T-Mobile, AT&T, and Sprint) in the
advertisement by using different sized representa-
tions of call quality. This misrepresentation caused
T-Mobile to make make a rebuttal commercial
mocking Verizon for lying to their audience, show-
ing the real standings between each company.

MATh
TED Talk: Calculus and String Art
Alea Legg
Mr. Ray Furstein
AP Calculus
Math is relevant in many aspects of everyday life, and art is no exception. A multitude of math concepts
appear in different art forms, such as shapes in painting and patterns in music. Calculus is a more com-
plicated form of math, and the purpose of this project was to discover how calculus relates to art. Re-
search was conducted to determine how the same methods used in calculus are used to create other
art forms. Information obtained through research was paired with knowledge from calculus classes to
come to conclusions. The research led to string art, a unique form of art that creates images using only
straight lines. The basis of this art form is the idea that combined lines can represent a curve because
these curves then create a picture. This idea is a fundamental concept used in many equations and the-
orems in calculus. This project concluded that calculus is present in art through the form of string art.

MATh
TED Talk: The Golden Ratio
Avni Sawant
Mr. Ray Furstein
GSE Accelerated
Geometry/Algebra II
The Golden Ratio is a fascinating mathematical phe-
nomenon found in settings such as architecture, art,
music, and nature. The ratio is an irrational number
derived as the geometric relationship between two
quantities. The intent of the project was to discover
the various algebraic properties of the Golden Ra-
tio and unearth its connection to all aspects of art.
The origin of the ratio started with the Greek letter
Phi representing the irrational value. Using this as
a platform to experiment with numerically solving
for Phi, unique properties such as its ability to cre-
ate logarithmic spirals was revealed. The quadratic
formula was used to the turn phi into a fraction,
which could then be calculated utilizing a calcula-
tor. Continuing on to integrating art into the ratio,
experimentation with different forms of art led to
Da Vinci and the presence of the Golden Rectangle,
a rectangle drawn from the Golden Ratio, in most
of his paintings. It was learned that not only is the
Golden Ratio a mathematical marvel in the sense that
it is considered the “most irrational” irrational num-
ber but also the fact that it is omnipresent in art.
TED Talk: Fibonacci and Nature
Jillian Meharj
Mr. Ray Furstein
GSE Accelerated
Geometry/Algebra II

MATh
Real Uses of Conic Sections
Jackie Luong and Dhananjay Khazanchi
Ms Julie Walls
Accelerated Pre Calculus
Conic sections are, in simplest terms, a represen-
tation of a “slice” of a double napped cone. The
sections that can be made are parabolas, circles,
hyperbolas, and ellipses. However, outside of the
classroom, these images are absent from our minds.
In this project, we see how often these mathemati-
cal calculations regularly appear in the world outside
of class. The presentation consisted of extensive and
calculations for the chosen applications of parabolas,
ellipses, and hyperbolas. The result of the research
gave rise to the Eiffel Tower being built with a parab-
ola in mind, a whispering gallery as an ellipse, and
a sonic boom in the shape of a hyperbola. Through
this project, one was able to learn the different
variations of simple conic sections and apply the
mathematical characteristics to these structures.
The Sinusoidal Application of
Blood Pressure
Joshua Mishkin
Ms Julie Walls
Accelerated Pre Calculus
Within the human body, blood pressure increases
with every heart beat and decreases between each.
This pattern follows that of a sine graph and can
therefore be represented by a sinusoidal function.
The purpose of this project was to understand the
way blood pressure changes in the body and repre-
sent it in a mathematical format. The nal product
was put together in a PowerPoint presentation. Re-
search on the systolic, diastolic, and heart beat rate
at in different scenarios (resting, aerobic exercise,
and Stage 1 Hypertension) was collected from the
NHLBI and Mayo Clinic was collected and functions/
graphs for each scenario were made. Research was
also collected from Emory healthcare professionals
for how the heart beat and blood pressure graph
line up. Details about blood pressure and how it
affects the body was learned during this project.

MATh
Michelle Nader, Anoushka Satoskar,
and Vicky Vassileva
Jagpreet Sodhi & Suraaj Samanta
Shayan Boghani & Sohawm Sengupta
Lexile Project
Lynn Barry, Laura Grier, and Amanda Morton
Honors Algebra II
Within the human body, blood pressure increases with every heart beat and decreases between
each. This pattern follows that of a sine graph and can therefore be represented by a sinusoi-
dal function. The purpose of this project was to understand the way blood pressure changes in the
body and represent it in a mathematical format. The nal product was put together in a Power-
Point presentation. Research on the systolic, diastolic, and heart beat rate at in different scenari-
os (resting, aerobic exercise, and Stage 1 Hypertension) was collected from the NHLBI and Mayo
Clinic was collected and functions/graphs for each scenario were made. Research was also col-
lected from Emory healthcare professionals for how the heart beat and blood pressure graph line
up. Details about blood pressure and how it affects the body was learned during this project.

MATh
Alexander Dyck
Annabelle Miller, A.J. Plante,
and Isabelle Chalker
Caroline Lanier & Nicole Berman
Jason Gardner & Cameron Ragan

Analyzing Collisions
Jessica Kan, Carys Thompson, and
Sofiya Vyshnya
Mr. Sergio Corvalan
AP Physics I
The objective of this experiment was to compare and
contrast collisions between inclined and at surfac-
es in a frictionless setting. We analyzed collisions
between surfaces such as blades, hooks, and play
dough on a frictionless air track because it provided
the ideal conditions for analyzing completely elastic
collisions. We found that all the collisions that were
not performed on an incline displayed the principle of
conservation of linear momentum because there were
no external forces acting on the system. The momen-
tum of the collisions performed on an incline did not
display this principle because the external force of
gravity caused a downward acceleration, which led
to an alteration of the vector sum of momentum.
phySicS
Biophysical Adaptations in the Animal World: An Investigation
Mihir Bellamkonda, Yu Chang, and James Johnston
Mr. Sergio Corvalan
AP Physics
Physics is sometimes considered by the general population, as well as some scientists, as “hard sci-
ence,that is, highly theoretical, abstract, and, at worst, irrelevant to the real world. We hope to dis-
pel this notion. By investigating in detail how biology and physics are highly interrelated in the animal
world, we gained knowledge of both elds and used the STEAM Symposium to expand the populace’s
ideas of what physics can be used for. We investigated a topic considered to be interesting and ac-
cessible by many, namely, animals, through the lens of applied physics. People are generally familiar
with animals such as the Gecko, the eel, and the Crow, but do not consider them to be physical crea-
tures, as such. We solved this problem through a detailed research paper explaining the deep connec-
tions between the physical and biological: we discuss the physical adaptation of the animal, its biolog-
ical form, and the implications of both on evolutionary success. In the end, theses connections proved
to be interesting and meaningful in and of themselves, and we consider our project to be a success.
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phySicS
Tesla Coil
Vishwa Ramkumar, Suhail Singh, and Melam Master
Mr. Sergio Corvalan
AP Physics 2
The project was to create a Tesla coil in order to create a better understanding of how induction
works. Induction was one of the topics in our curriculum that interested us and got us motivat-
ed to create a Tesla coil. The parts were ordered through the school and assembled into a Tesla coil.
Challenges were faced on the home made capacitors as it was not as efcient as they should have
been. This was a nice experience as it taught us about electricity and how our home circuits work ev-
ery day. It made us appreciate the brilliant mind of Nikola Tesla and other electrical engineers.
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phySicS
Two-Phase Countercurrent Flow
Pranav Khorana and Surya Sundaram
Mr. Eric Ritenour
AP Physics I
The purpose of this experiment was to demonstrate an interesting principle of air & water pressure,
known as two phase countercurrent ow. This experiment is important because it demonstrates the
power of air pressure in many situations. We are trying to properly exhibit two phase countercurrent
ow, using a plastic container and a plastic water bottle connected by a tube. To go about exhibit-
ing this we added water to the upper part of the system, the plastic container, and allowed it to be-
gin owing down to the lower sealed water bottle. Once this happened the air pressure in the bottom
bottle overcame the pressure of water and air from the upper container; thus pushing the water back
up and representing two phase countercurrent ow. We discovered the ow rate decreases as water
ows to the lower tank. This phenomenon occurs in situations in the real world, such as in severe acci-
dents in pressurized water reactor plants, and we have correctly demonstrated it in this experiment.
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phySicS
Pedal Power Generator
Henry Johnson
Mr. Sergio Corvalan
AP Physics I
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roBoTicS
CIRCUIT RUNNERS Robotics Team
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roBoTicS
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roBoTicS
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roBoTicS
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STEAM Symposium LIVE 2016
Mrs. Leigh Anne Kuhn
Wildcat TV
viDEo proDucTion
We are prepared to continue the legacy of quality and professionalism in the Wheeler News Studio.
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viDEo proDucTion
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The Weather Sculpture
Alex Pace & Dylan Swan
Mrs. Kelly Karr
VA Comprehensive
The Weather Sculpture is a visual representation of the weather. It is better way to show weather data
than a spread sheet because it enables the observer to absorb more information faster, and the view-
er can see lots of big picture trends in the data. It is created with chicken wire, many different fabrics,
staples, and beads. The rst step was to collect the weather data (moon phase, temperatures, wind
direction, and precipitation) from a website called weatherunderground.com. Then fabric was woven
into the chicken wire to represent the weather data: the top third of the relief sculpture represents the
moon phases, the middle third represents the sky conditions (sunny, thunderstorm, sun/cloud mix, etc.)
and the high and low temperatures, and the lower third represents the wind direction. It was recog-
nized that the sky is not often sunny, it is usually a sun cloud mix. It was observed that the majority of
people are more drawn to this kind of visual representation than they are to a spread sheet of data.
viSuAl ArT
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viSuAl ArT
4,000 Thumbprints
Jazmyn Campos
Mrs. Kelly Karr
Sculpture 1 Class
Teenage texting and driving has had a profound impact on our society. With the constant devel-
opment of new technology, it’s difcult for today’s teens to put their devices down, even while be-
hind the wheel. An average of eleven teens per day are killed as a result of texting and driving,
resulting in approximately 4,000 deaths per year. To visually represent the enormity of this prob-
lem, each student in our Sculpture class left 200 ngerprints on a car’s bumper, resulting in 4,000
ngerprints total. The effect of the car bursting through the wall was created using a variety of
found and repurposed materials. The idea behind data-driven artwork is that statistics can be ef-
fectively represented in dramatic visual form for greater impact. The purpose of this project was to
raise awareness of the dangers of texting and driving through impactful artwork. We hope that we
have literally “left an impression” on our peers in hopes of changing mindsets and saving lives.
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A Modern Coral Reef
Julia Reddish
Mrs. Kelly Karr
VA Comprehensive
Coral is alive and made up of thousands of coral polyps with live plant-like cells called zooxanthellae. The
skeletons coral polyps make for themselves provide structure to support many types of life. But when
the coral is stressed by environmental factors, the zooxanthellae are expelled from the polyps. The coral
then loses its color and is more likely to succumb to disease. Coral reefs harbor diverse life and are im-
portant for research and tourist attractions, but one of the outstanding facts about corals is that they are
“impossible.” They are examples of hyperbolic geometry. In 1997 Dr. Daina Taimina discovered a way to
create models of hyperbolic structure through the art of crochet, when beforehand it was thought impos-
sible by many. The model created shows a healthy versus bleached coral reef. Each coral is handmade
and based on real corals found in reefs. Through the visualization of hyperbolic geometry, the model is
a very accurate representation of coral structures. The creation of this model required research in biol-
ogy, mathematics, ber arts and engineering. It was quickly found that mimicking nature is a startling-
ly difcult task with amazing results, specically spreading awareness about endangered coral reefs.
viSuAl ArT
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viSuAl ArT
Origami in Engineering
Reynold Kao
Mrs. Kelly Karr & Professor Orren Williams
Art & Engineering
In daily life, we rely on engineering concepts and inventions to drive the majority of simple tasks that we
take for granted, such as lighting, basic housing, plumbing, and even more. However, what most people
don’t recognize is how there is also artistic beauty and design in those engineering products. That is what
this project is trying to display: the integration and application of the ancient folding art, origami, in engi-
neering concepts. The materials used were multiple color variants of paper and specic designs that could
serve an engineering purpose. One piece on display was the hexagonal tessellation structure, which serves
as an example of makeshift housing and at compression. Another piece exhibits modular tubing, which
uses interweaving folds to create an expandable and constricting tube that’s applicable to blood stents.
These were found to not only be unique concepts, but also concepts that have already been explored and
employed in current engineering. Overall, it shows that an ancient art such as origami that has already bor-
rowed upon engineering principles could still show more about what can be improved upon in today’s world.
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viSuAl ArT
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ElEMEnTAry School projEcTS
Self Sustaining Garden
Michael Black(5 Grade), Brendan Thies(KSU), Landon Autry(KSU, Chris Webb(KSU)
Mr. William Dryden
Brumby Elementary
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ElEMEnTAry School projEcTS
International Space Station
Adrian Paige, Michelle Ramasu, Eddie Ramirez, Zion Dean-Bain
Mr. Christina Duncan
Sedalia Park Elementary
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ElEMEnTAry School projEcTS
Eyes in the Sky
Harper Pfaffinger, Jana El-Khalil, Ashur Montalvo, and Layza Wenclevski
Mr. Christina Duncan
Sedalia Park Elementary
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ElEMEnTAry School projEcTS
Inner Planets
Jorge Solano, Imahn Simpson, Kevin Dos Santos, Eduardo Almanza
Ms.Christina Duncan
Sedalia Park Elementary
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ElEMEnTAry School projEcTS
Treehouse Engineering- Blueprint creation and Simple machines
Layza Wencleuski
Ms.Christina Duncan
Sedalia Park Elementary
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ElEMEnTAry School projEcTS
LEGO Egg racer #1
Zachary Maikwood
Mrs. Cheri Craft
Sedalia Park Elementary
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ElEMEnTAry School projEcTS
LEGO Egg racer #2
Alexey Pyekh
Mr. Cheri Craft
Sedalia Park Elementary
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ElEMEnTAry School projEcTS
Helicopter Hang Time #1
Ellen Violet Thompson
Mr. Cheri Craft
Sedalia Park Elementary
Helicopter Hang Time #2
Aastha Crudibande, Ankita Ram
Mr. Cheri Craft
Sedalia Park Elementary
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ElEMEnTAry School projEcTS
Minion Soccer
London Vailes, Zachary Pensinger, Liam Crane
Mr. Cheri Craft
Sedalia Park Elementary
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ElEMEnTAry School projEcTS
Industrial Pollution
Ridhi Koner and Sydney Craft
Mr. Cheri Craft
Sedalia Park Elementary
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ElEMEnTAry School projEcTS
Turkey Dress up Barn
Isabel Estrella
Mr. Cheri Craft
Sedalia Park Elementary
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ElEMEnTAry School projEcTS
Flint River Crisis
Owen Shalin, Jude McCabe
Mr. Cheri Craft
Sedalia Park Elementary
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ElEMEnTAry School projEcTS
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SpeCiAl ThAnkS To The volunTeerS, gueSTS,
& f
ACulTy for Spending The evening AT
T
he Wheeler STeAM SyMpoSiuM 2016
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Joseph Wheeler High School
375 Holt Road, Marietta Ga 30068
www.wheelermagnet.com
2013