YOSEMITE GAZETTE Yosemite, California YOSEMITE GAZE a 10,000 circul TTE ation quarterly jou rnal features the past, present and future of Yosemite reg ion and the Mothe r Lode every three mo nths! EXTRA! EXTRA! 8 READ ALL ABOUT IT! Emergency Services Chief Cites High Call Volume In April, 2013, the Yosemite Gazette met with Yosemite National Park’s Emergency Services Program Manager, Ranger Lisa Hendy. She came to Yosemite recently from the Grand Canyon NP. Hendy received the NPS’s 2011 Harry Yount National Park Ranger Award for excellence in the field of rangering. It is the highest honor that can be bestowed on a park ranger today. Her NPS career began in 1993 as a Wilderness intern. She has served at Yosemite before and at Rocky Mountain, Arches, and Yellowstone National Parks. Yosemite Gazette: You’ve been at Yosemite this time for over a year. How have you and your family adapted to living at the park? Is it what you expected?   Childhood Springtimes in Yosemite Page Six 8 Early Transportation Timeline Page Seven 8 Debut Opening of the Gazette Gallery Page Eight and Nine 8 A Hike Along the History of Bagby Page Ten 8 Yosemite Tourism Creates $379 Million Page Thirteen 8 Toot Your Horn for Camp Curry Page Fifteen 8 Readers’ Spring Photos Page Sixteen Complimentary Spring 2013 Ranger Hendy: I think it is what I expected – very busy with a high call volume and a lot of extremely professional co-workers. I was privileged enough to have worked with the majority of the ranger staff at Yosemite while we were serving in other parks, so having so many friends to work with has definitely helped me settle in. Photograph courtesy of National Park Service Highline River Rescue Technique Yosemite held its annual Swift Water Demonstration Day recently where Park Rangers and Search and Rescue personnel demonstrated rescue techniques on the Merced River. The event highlights spring water safety conditions. The image above shows the “highline” river rescue technique. The Merced River is flowing at just under peak capacity for the 2013 season. Yosemite Gazette: Can you tell us what the Mission Statement of your organization is?   Ranger Hendy: The NPS mission statement is “…to conserve the scenery and natural and historic objects and the wildlife therein and YNP and SNF: The Beginnings of Becoming Back Fence Neighbors By R. Brian Kermeen Yosemite National Park shares much of its vast “borders” with the Stanislaus National Forest and other national forests. YNP (761,268 acres) was officially formed in 1891 and the SNP (898,099 acres) was established in 1897. Both grew out of a conservation movement that gained national political recognition in the early 20th century but do the Park and the Forest have the same “mission” in the 21st century? Is one a “museum” and the other a “resource manager?” Robert Frost wrote “Good fences make good neighbors.” Have the SNF and YNP been good neighbors over the last 100 years? As an introduction to what may become an evolving collaboration of contributors, we begin on Page 3, a multi-part series which will include: 1. A short history of both entities and “founding” father(s). 2. Missions of both and changes over the years. 3. Is fire management the biggest change of missions? 4. Good neighbors now? Interagency-inter department meetings? 5. Future? Merge Departments Interior and Agriculture? (Continued on Page 3) to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such a manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations.” Yosemite Emergency Services is in place to assist in upholding that mission statement. Our role in doing so is to support the three Districts’ operations as they provide for the life safety of the visiting public.   Yosemite G azette: YOSA R (Yosemite Search and Rescue) is one of the best SAR groups in the nation. Can you highlight the qualifications to be a member of YOSAR?   Ranger Hendy: Our personnel have a wide variety of skills necessary to run major SAR operations. We have volunteers who are qualified as preventive search and rescue educators and basic searchers, all the way up to the highly skilled Helicopter Rescue Team and SAR site team members. There are financial officers, logistics specialists, swift water (Continued on Page 11)
YOSEMITE GAZETTE Yosemite, California YOSEMITE GAZE a 10,000 circul TTE ation quarterly jou rnal features the past,   pres...

Page Two YOSEMITE GAZETTE Photograph courtesy of Susan Sullivan, Namasta Rafting Spring in the Yosemite Region — Present (above) and Past (below) Each quarter we feature a photograph that represents a seasonal theme. The photo (above) is of a group— from Namaste Rafting, owner Susan Sullivan, (right)—which combines elements of Yoga with natural surroundings. What better time and place than Spring in Yosemite as water flow is at its highest along the banks of the Merced. Namaste Rafting partners with outfitters, such as YExplore, which offers outdoor adventures in the Yosemite Region. Photograph courtesy of Alice van Ommeren “Yosemite’s Historic Hotels and Camps” The evening entertainment was an important element of the Camp Curry experience. In 1915, the south veranda of the registration building was converted into a stage for nightly readings and talks. This postcard shows Grace Roger Jilson, who was a popular storyteller at Camp Curry for several seasons in the late 1910s. This stage was replaced by the amphitheater in 1953. (For more Camp Curry nostalgic “ephemera,” turn to page 15.) Vintage Photographs Featured in Local Histories What do Alice van Ommeren, Stockton (Yosemite’s Historic Hotels and Camps) and Michael Gahagan, Columbia (Sonora) have in common? They have written and compiled area histories, part of Arcadia Publishing’s Images of America series which celebrate the history of neighborhoods, towns and cities across the country. Using archival photographs, each title presents the distinctive stories from the past that shape the character of the community today. The Yosemite Gazette will publish photos (In the Winter issue those from Hetch Hetchy and Mono Lake Basin) used in their books, along with a featured seasonal photo chosen from portfolios, websites or Facebook pages of our friends. Yosemite’s Historic Hotels and Camps is the most recent title to be published covering the Yosemite region area. We are encouraging submissions with a summertime theme for our next issue. Photographs can be black and white or color and those we don’t publish will be posted on our website pages and Facebook albums. Send high resolution (300 dpi) photos to Editor@YosemiteGazette.com. Sullivan, a Senore High School graduate says, “I find practicing yoga in the outdoors extremely powerful. ‘Breathing in Yosemite’ elicits a state of bliss, passion, energy and health resulting from an intrinsic desire to feel connected with nature. In my experience my yoga practice is elevated literally and figuratively when inhaling and exhaling in the mountains.” For more information on the outdoor yoga escapes at www.namasterafting.com. Photograph courtesy of Tuolumne County Historical Society “Sonora” Members of the Good Templars and Band of Hope stage an elaborate picnic on the property of G. P. Morgan, second from left. These outings were sometimes all day adventures from Sonoran homes to destination and back. This group of well dressed picnickers was recorded for posterity, June 11, 1892 on the shores of old Phoenix Lake. The International Order of Good Templars was originally a fraternal organization espousing temperance or total abstinence founded in the 19th century with a structure modeled on Freemasonry. Their motto was “Faith, Hope and Charity.”
Page Two  YOSEMITE GAZETTE  Photograph courtesy of Susan Sullivan, Namasta Rafting  Spring in the Yosemite Region     Pres...
Page Three Yosemite, California, Spring 2013 YNP and SNF: The Beginnings of Becoming Back Fence Neighbors (Continued from Page 1) Courtesy of Ayres Collection; USDA Forest Service, Stanislaus National Forest Meeting of Early Rangers In 1898 an army officer by the name of Allen came to Sonora and organized the first ranger force. This inaugural ranger meeting on the Stanislaus was held May 1907. Supervisor S. N. L. Ellis is seated on the far left. From left to right (first row) are Ellis, F. Rice, J. B. Pestoni, and B. O. Lovelace; (middle row) W. A. Antonini, W. H. Rushing, O. P. Brownlow, and Bud Lewis; (back row) W. L. Sears, Bert Lewis, C. Callahan, and Marshall Ellis. It was a bureaucratic challenge par excellence for the new agency to cope with new and traditional forest uses on a non-traditional scale: like special use permits (then called “special privilege permits”) for huge hydroelectric projects and timber sales to the Standard Lumber Company. 8 Editor’s Note: The U. S. Forest Service is an agency of the U. S. Department of Agriculture and the National Park Service is a bureau of the U. S. Department of the Interior. During the first half of the 19th century, writers like Emerson and Thoreau called for setting aside of scenic natural areas. At first word spread slowly about the majesty of the valley. Galen Clark was the first European American to discover the nearby Mariposa grove of Big Trees in 1855. In 1860, J. C. Lamar established the first homestead. Others followed and within a few years James Hutchings began the first tourism development for visitors. Under a series of federal laws intended to encourage citizen occupation and private development of the West, the highly political General Land Office under the U.S. Department of the Interior routinely gave title to those who made improvements on federal lands. The combination of spectacular scenery and giant trees attracted visitors despite the very difficult two or three day journey on horseback from civilization. Eventually artists and the first photographers helped to make the area known. Early concern increased about uncontrolled development, logging of the giant trees, and $ .95/mo. Histories www.Conifercom.Net Local other threats, especially forest fires. Clark and photographer Carlton Watkins were instrumental in convincing U. S. Senator John Conness (California) to propose protective legislation in 1864. During the darkest days of the Civil War, time was taken by Congress and President Lincoln to protect Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove of Big Trees (two separate areas). This was the first action by the Federal Government to conserve or protect land. The land was granted to the new State of California to hold and they formally accepted. Clark was hired as the guardian by the state with a total budget of $500. These actions occurred before the arrival of John Muir in 1868. The first challenge to the Yosemite Grant came from Lamar and Hutchings who claimed ownership rights. It went all the way to the US Supreme Court but not until 1873. The dispute eroded public and political support for the park, undermining the efforts of the commission. Outside of the area protected by the grant, private business interests developed toll roads, mining operations, water projects, tourism support services, railroads, grazing and logging operations. They often competed with each other and highlighted the need for greater oversight by government. Future articles will explore the people and actions that shaped the local landscape and often influenced national policy. Names like Olmstead, Muir, Johnson, Pinchot, Cleveland, Roosevelt and Mather are connected to the local drama that eventually resulted in the creation of the USDA Forest Service and National Park Service. Why were the two agencies created rather than one? More than a century later, are the reasons still valid? Topics such as fire management, wilderness, forest and grazing management, recreation and transportation will be examined for a comparison between agencies with an emphasis on Yosemite and adjacent National Forests. What will likely change in the future? Is a merger reasonable? What would Muir have to say about this? 8 Editor’s Note: Brian Kermeen worked as a landscape architect and recreation manager in the USDA Forest Service for 35 years. Email:briankermeen@yahoo.com
Page Three  Yosemite, California, Spring 2013  YNP and SNF  The Beginnings of Becoming Back Fence Neighbors  Continued fro...
Springtime in Yosemite Environs is to Go with the Flow YOSEMITE GAZETTE Some weeks ago when discussing the seasonal springtime theme of this issue with contributors, artists and writers, the majority of those mentioned water as the common element that most visually and audiologically (yep, you heard write) “describes” the wonder of Yosemite in the springtime. Water is everywhere in Yosemite. The falls, the streams, rivers, ponds, lakes, are at the highest flow and capacity of the year in the Yosemite Region. Maybe my Cancer birthday has something to do with my love of water or maybe it’s because I lived very close to oceans and rivers most of my life. My paper route was the entire Scenic Drive along Carmel Beach. I lived for several years on the western shore of Tomales Bay, Marin County and aboard a houseboat on the cottonwood lined banks of the ol’ Sacramento just a few kayak paddles up from the confluence of the American River. Even here in Columbia we are fortunate to have a property line defined by a tumbling, burbling, rumbling historic ditch, The Matelot. As we near summer, this issue of the Yosemite Gazette presents some mementos, remembrances of spring in Yosemite and environs particularly with the debut of our Gazettee Gallery on pages 8 and 9. Young artists Gannon and Nolan Dona, our first Gazette Gallery Michael Gahagan The Editor and Publisher writes,“Let me say this about that.” artists, capture a Yosemite Valley springtime of foraging animals, Mule Deer—Yosemite Meadow, and a colorful waterfall rendering, Yosemite Waterfall. Our very first “senior” artist, showcased in the Gazette Gallery, Sherie Drake offers a spring green meadow with a backdrop of Temples of Nature in fluid acrylic. The full color versions of the contributions to the Gazette Gallery will be presented in our Facebook pages as albums. In the near future these centerfold pages (four) will be printed on a white stock and in four-color process so that we can present the full “rainbow” spectrum of “living” color which magically seems more vibrant and intense in Yosemite and surrounds. And here’s where I can insert a blatantly contrived commercial message. (Please put that remote control down.) To add pages, especially color pages, costs of printing go up considerably and even though this edition contains some new and larger advertising support, we still have a long way to go. One other way of helping us provide a more interesting, entertaining and compelling publication is by subscribing. If every one of our Facebook friends, for example, subscribed for just one year, this new income would pay for one quarterly issue including four additional pages printed in color. Now click on that remote and go immediately to Page Sixteen of this issue and fill out the Subscription Form. “This will require sacrifice.” “If the Valley’s ecological web is to remain intact, each and every one of us must let go of our favorite things; by ‘things’ I mean human-made things. We all have our favorites, whether it’s Degnan’s Deli turkey sandwiches or pepperoni pizza at the Loft, campsite #286 in Upper Pines Campground, or tent cabin number whatever at Curry Village. For the Valley’s sake, we have to let go of these attachments and focus collectively on what we truly love about the Valley: the river, the rocks, the way the sun plays on the meadow grasses at dawn, the imposing face of El Capitan, the magenta hue of Half Dome at sunset, the stars, the coyotes, the deer, and the bears—the entities that make Yosemite sacred and unique. We can get pizza and have favorite campsites anywhere, but none of us will ever find the collection of sheer magnificence embraced within Yosemite Valley anywhere else on Earth. We need to come together to protect the wonder, the sacredness, the remnants of wildness, the heart and soul reasons we love Yosemite so deeply and so fiercely. This will require sacrifice.” Photograph courtesy of Barbara J. Moritsch (From The Soul of Yosemite by Barbara J. Moritsch) Then you can go back to more watercentric springtime articles by Mr. Half Dome, Rick Deutsch about Yosemite Emergency Services and spring swift water rescue, p. 1); by Sharon Giacomazzi, about Bagby by the Merced, p. 10; and by new contributing writer David Hubbard, a Yosemite born native, who debuts with an enchanting recollective piece Remembering Childhood Springtimes in Yosemite, p. 6. Or you can just go with the flow. Michael Gahagan Published quarterly by the Yosemite Publishing Company P. O. Box 5227 Sonora, California 95370 209-536-1143 Editor@YosemiteGazette.com Editor and Publisher Michael Gahagan Assistant to the Editor Valerie Seimas Correspondents-Contributors Marc Fossum, Rick Deutsch, Tom Gardner, Debbie Adams, Renny Avey, David Lukas, John Carroll O’Neill, Peter Hoss, Elizabeth Stone O’Neill, Leroy Radanovich, David Hubbard, Sharon Giacomazzi, Michael Elsohn Ross, Kimberly Francis Advertising-Marketing Social Media-Illustrator Kimberly Francis Circulation Malcolm Milliron Printing Foothill Printing & Graphics LIKE US ON FACEBOOK
Springtime in Yosemite Environs is to Go with the Flow YOSEMITE GAZETTE    Some weeks ago when discussing the seasonal spr...
Yosemite, California, Spring 2013 Letters to the Editor Congratulations Editor, Congratulations on becoming editor and publisher of the Yosemite Gazette!! Both my husband and myself have enjoyed reading the past several issues and especially liked the articles on fishing in the Yosemite region.  We both love to fly fish and are hikers. We have enclosed a check for a subscription and look forward with anticipation to the next issue!!  Sincerely, Lissa and Wendel Nicolaus Ross, California Searching for a Classic Climbing Movie Page Five Letters to the Editor I Love the Yosemite Gazette Editor, I am/have been a subscriber to the Yosemite Gazette for a few years, I just picked a free copy at the True Value hardware store in Mariposa, an issue  “Winter 2013” that I have not received. Has my subscription lapsed? If so send me a bill! Pierre Monette Mariposa, California Hi Pierre, There has been a change in ownership of the Yosemite Gazette and in the transition, we are running late with the timing of most every phase of “delivery” from the printing schedule and including the direct mailing to subscribers. You still have one more issue (the upcoming Spring 2013 issue) on your annual subscription. Would you like a mailed copy of the one you picked up? We greatly appreciate your subscription even though you can find the current complimentary issues in various venues in your neck of the woods.      Sincerely,        Michael Gahagan, Editor-Publisher Editor, Many, many years ago I checked this movie (Sentinel: The West Face) out from the local library and watched it on reel to reel.  I always wanted to purchase this great climbing movie with Editor Chouinard and Robbins. There is no need to send me the Winter 2013 issue, I love the Yosemite Can you direct me to where I Gazette and will be glad to renew. can buy the movie? Pierre Monette, Mariposa   Thank you, Bill Smale Rio Oso, California What Really is a Scud? rio_osobill@yahoo.com Editor, The story about nymph fly fishing in the Winter 2013 issue needs one Editor’s Note: In the late 1960s climbing clarification. The caption under the picture of a scud “fly” pattern could be was in its formative years, and misleading. It should read just “Scud pattern” not “Scud Nymph pattern.” Nymphs are a stage in the metamorphosis its crucible was Yosemite Valley. of a couple of important aquatic insects that Royal Robbins and Yvon Chouinard are major trout food sources. Scuds aren’t were two of the best climbers in Photograph courtesy of Serac Films aquatic insects. They are crustaceans. the world, and their ascent of Yvon Chouinard, founder of Patagonia, Renny J. Avey the West Face of the Sentinel, climbing in Yosemite in the 1960s. Gardnerville, Nevada as captured by the film, proved Scud pattern ravey@calpoly.edu a perfect exploration of the poetry of the nascent sport. The film was written and narrated by Barry Corbet, the inspiration for The Alpinist Film Festival, after the accident that paralyzed him. “His soul shows in the words,” says director Roger Brown. It won Best Film at the 1966 Yosemite Gazette Gazettes Around Trento (Italy) Film Festival. Editor, Hi Bill, I’m a freelance writer from the SF Bay Area. I’ve been visiting I apologize, this took a little research collaboration and the bottom Yosemite annually since the 1990s.  A friend picked up a copy of the line is that there is no copy of the film available for purchase at this point. Yosemite Gazette at a Los Gatos coffee shop and gave it to me knowing about There could be a DVD made if there were enough requests: see this link…. my passion for hiking in Yosemite. Are you open to contributed articles for http://www.thirdeyeadventures.com/index.html upcoming issues?  I’ve been writing for Bay Area community newspapers Go to “Films” scroll down to “Outdoor Adventure” where you will since the 1990s, and I’m preparing for a July hike up Clouds Rest with a see the blurb about “Sentinel: The West Face.” Then go back to the top group of Bay Area hiking enthusiasts. where it will explain what to do if interested in purchasing films without a Thanks in advance for you consideration, “Buy This” button, contact us at info@summitfilmsinc.com or fill out the Robin Shepherd Request Information panel on this page. Los Gatos, Calfornia Roger Brown, 1.970.524.9769 (Producer of the film...looks like you Hi Robin, could call him.) Certainly would like to have an account of your hike in July for http://www.verticalfrontier.org/ There is also another option, I think, at the link below, but I haven’t consideration to include in our Summer or Fall issue. Sounds like fun. Please include two to three photographs (high resolution—300 dpi). Current pay tried the download. for http://www.movierevie.ws/movies/141080/Sentinel-The-West-Face.html articles is a one year subscription to the Yosemite Gazette and most Also, here’s a link to an article we ran (January-March 2010) with certainly a prestigious by-line and publishing credit.      Happy Trails! photos taken just about the time the movie might have been shot. http://yosemitegazette.com/index.php?        Michael Gahagan, Editor-Publisher
Yosemite, California, Spring 2013  Letters to the Editor  Congratulations  Editor,   Congratulations on becoming editor an...
Page Six YOSEMITE GAZETTE Remembering Childhood Springtimes in Yosemite Photograph courtesy of D. H. Hubbard Yosemite’s Hubbard Family That’s my dad Doug Hubbard on the left, my brother Doug junior, my mom Fran and me, and sisters Janet and Joan. The Hubbard family lived in Yosemite National Park for 13 years. I was was born in Yosemite in 1953. by David Hubbard As the sun rose higher in the sky and the days warmed after the long winter freeze, a transformation took place in Yosemite Valley. Meadows began to “green” and the newest batches of animal babies started to appear Mother bears with their cubs and the raccoons with their little ones were soon looking for an easy meal wherever it could be found. For those of us living in the park, our trash cans were the most frequent target. If something especially tantalizing had been thrown out the night before, (unlike the raccoons who would conduct a more surgical strike), the bears would just “bulldoze” the can. Having been born in Yosemite myself, I looked forward to seeing the new babies every spring as though they were my own newborn brothers and sisters. If our garbage was what brought them around, the clean up afterwards was worth it to me. There was one unmistakable indicator that spring in Yosemite had actually finally arrived, and it was the steadily increasing flow of water that began “booming” over Yosemite Falls. The three falls that comprise Yosemite Falls were always the first in the valley to come back to life. Situated on the sunny warmer north side of the valley, the snow fields in the high elevations above Yosemite falls began their melt and runoff before any other. The water from the previous winter’s melting snow deposits, which lay deep upon Photograph courtesy of D. H. Hubbard At One As Yosemite Valley began to warm, Yosemite Falls announced the arrival of spring. vast granite surfaces, had only one place to go. Little was absorbed by the rocky ground. Mine was a National Park Service family. My mom and dad, Fran and Doug Hubbard, had met years before in Sequoia while dad was still a seasonal employee with the National Park Service. Now living in Yosemite less than a mile from the base of Yosemite Falls, readjusting to the rumble from its reawakening always took a little time. But before long we would become so accustomed to being surrounded by the new sounds of spring that we had to make an effort to notice them at all. I loved the streams that “spiderwebbed” their way from the valley walls. I spent most of my summer days in the forests where I would often find new deep hollows in the creeks gouged out by the spring’s heavy runoff. It was there that I could find frogs, and if I was really lucky maybe something unexpected. But none of that was going to happen in the spring. People drowned in those swift waters and I knew it! The streams this time of year showed the effect of the melt in the high country and I often wondered what kept the little animals that I found living there from being washed away. The snows that remained from the winter, hiding in their shady pockets on the valley floor, added what they had to the volume of water as the sun rose higher and they too began to melt. On the cold and dark south side of the valley, there were places that existed in the permanent shade of the towering granite walls above. Snow remained here well into the summer, when rising temperatures finally melted it. Water run-off that is not absorbed by the soil eventually finds the Merced River. The rivers icy cold water flows over Nevada Falls and then Vernal Falls before reaching the valley. Dropping down many thousands of feet in elevation from the mountains in the high country, the Merced flows steadily westward. Summer temperatures did not warm the water of the Merced River and any swimming that we wanted to do required a running start! The result was always a massive “brain freeze” and shivers for the effort! With the water volume from an average winter’s melting snow fall, “the Merced” reaches capacity and eventually rises over its banks in some low lying areas. It contributes its excess water to the temporary formation of large ponds, in the lowest areas of the grassy meadows along the valley floor. The dampness this water leaves behind encourages the various wildflowers that will later fill the meadow. Photograph courtesy of D. H. Hubbard Exploring Yosemite’s Creeks I loved exploring in the deep woods. You never knew what surprises you might find. Considering the inescapable presence of water everywhere in Yosemite, it should come as no surprise that it has been the action of this water, both as water and as ice, that has formed the thousands of square miles that is Yosemite National Park. The flowing water of the Merced River has been one of the primary agents of change in Yosemite. Flowing for many thousands of years from its sources high in the mountains down great slopes and at high speed, erosion took place here more rapidly than with slower waters. The proof of this is inescapable as the Merced River today follows its course over 620 feet below where the smaller and slower Bridalveil creek drops into the valley as Bridalveil (Continued on Page 14) Reasonable Rates Insured Window Cleaning Air Duct Cleaning Retractable Screen Doors (209) 532-5700 and much more….. www.winterscleaning.com
Page Six  YOSEMITE GAZETTE  Remembering Childhood Springtimes in Yosemite  Photograph courtesy of D. H. Hubbard  Yosemite ...
Yosemite, California, Spring 2013 Page Seven A Timeline of Early Transportation into the Park In 1856, Andrew Huston and Milton Mann completed a horse trail from Mormon Bar, near the town of Mariposa, to Yosemite Valley via present-day Wawona. The round-trip charge was $4 per horse or wagon or $2 for walkers. That same year, George Coulter and Lafayette Bunnell built the Coulterville Free Trail, which passed by Hazel Green, Crane Flat and Tamarack Flat. The Coulterville Yosemite Turnpike opened to traffic in June 1874 and the Old Big Oak Flat Road opened the next month. The following summer, wagons and stagecoaches traveled from Mariposa to Yosemite on the newly opened Mariposa/Wawona Road, which was built using Chinese labor. The Glacier Point Road opened to stagecoach traffic in 1882,and the Great Sierra Wagon Road opened in 1883. The later road was built as a supply route for the Great Sierra Consolidated Mining Company’s operations on the eastern side of Tioga Pass. About 250 Chinese laborers worked for $1.50 apiece per day on road construction, which started in fall of 1882 and was completed the following September. In just 130 days, this 56-mile road was built across the Yosemite Sierra for a cost of $61,095. Shortly after its completion the mines closed and the road fell into disrepair. On June 24, 1900 a Stanley steamer, driven by Oliver Lippincott, entered the valley via the Wawona Road. When the U.S. Cavalry administered the park, officers believed that automobiles and motorcycles were incompatible with the predominant horse-drawn vehicles. To preclude accidents, acting superintendent H. C. Benson banned autos in 1907. Public pressure to drop the ban mounted until Secretary of the Interior Franklin K. Lane partially lifted it in April 1913—allowing autos to enter Yosemite only via the Coulterville Road. On May 15, 1907 the first train from Merced arrived in El Portal. Within five years the Yosemite Lumber Company started logging the sugar pines on the south rim of the Merced Canyon. Logs were transported via an incline to the railroad in El Portal and from there via rail cars to a lumber mill at Merced Falls 53 miles away. In the 1920s the only road kept open to Yosemite Valley all year round from El Portal was cleared by rangers using a wooden-V snowplow pulled by horses during the winter so that mail could arrive at park headquarters. 8 Editor’s Note: These factoids of early transportation were compiled from “Yosemite Trivia” (2011) by Michael Elsohn Ross, who has guided visitors in the park since 1975. His email address: meross@att.net and his website is located at: www.yosemitenaturalist.com.
Yosemite, California, Spring 2013  Page Seven  A Timeline of Early Transportation into the Park In 1856, Andrew Huston and...
Page Eight YOSEMITE GAZETTE The Gazette Gallery The Gazette Gallery Drawing courtesy of Gannon Dona “Mule Deer—Yosemite Meadow” by Gannon Dona Young Yosemite Artists Series Debuts Yosemite National Park touches the lives of many each year with priceless memories. We wanted to share art provided by young artists who have been inspired by Yosemite. In this Spring Issue, we are featuring artists Gannon (10) and Nolan (7) Dona of Sonora, CA. They’re brothers who love the outdoors, sports, art and family vacations. Parents Dan and Amanda Dona are proud of their sons and are excited to see their art work published in the Yosemite Gazette. Gannon and Nolan were students in Ms. Kimberly’s art classes held at the Ventana-Annex Gallery in Sonora in 2012. “They are bright, kind and talented brothers who express excellence in a variety of art mediums, as well as share a true generosity to fellow art students,” said Ms. Kimberly. If you know a young artist who wants to share their Yosemite masterpieces with the Yosemite Gazette, please mail work to PO Box 5227, Sonora, CA 95370. From Dust to Granite: the Yosemite Art and Writings of Jo Mora Forward by Peter Hiller, paintings, sketches, photographs and the journal of renowned western artist Jacinto Joseph “Jo” Mora when he visited Yosemite in the summer of 1904. Tom and Jerry, Mora’s mule team nearing the crest of Priest Grade in 1904 on a trip from San Jose to Yosemite. Drawing courtesy of Nolan Dona “Yosemite Waterfall” by Nolan Dona “This picture is of my favorite thing in Yosemite and that is the waterfalls,” Nolan wrote in a note accompanying his piece created and submitted as the first, along with his brother Gannon, of young artists’ contributions to the “Gazette Gallery.” Reserve copies of these special collectors’ limited editions Contact Constance O’Connor, Central Sierra Arts Council 209.532.2787 or e.mail Connie@CentralSierraArts.org or check www.CentralSierraArts.org All editions will be numbered and signed Soft Covered Hard Backed Special $50 $100 First Edition First Edition Deluxe Collectors’T OU LD First SO Edition $200 All proceeds benefit the Central Sierra Arts Council a 501 (c)(3) non-profit
Page Eight  YOSEMITE GAZETTE  The Gazette Gallery The Gazette Gallery  Drawing courtesy of Gannon Dona     Mule Deer   Yos...
Yosemite, California, Spring 2013 Page Nine The Gazette Gallery The Gazette Gallery Featured Artist Sonora artist Sherie Drake takes a new approach with her art by using different art mediums. Her specialties range from figurative drawings, portraitures, pastels, oils and acrylics. “Letting go allows new forms to be created,” said Drake. Her latest work is experimenting with fluid acrylics. By placing the acrylic in a squeeze bottle she can apply the paint to canvas with a drawing technique using contour line and a palette knife can be used to move the paint around for different variations.  Drake has been heavily involvement in the community, donating art work to local events and churches, as well as being a mentor for a Senior at Sonora High School for her Senior Project in figure drawing. Drake has participated in the Mother Lode Art Association Annual Art Show and has received numerous awards at juried art competitions. Drake grew up in the Pacific Northwest and raised her family in the San Jose area. She taught figure classes in the Bay at Mountain View, Los Altos Adult Education and Palo Alto Art Center for 10 years. Drake currently paints at Studio B, an art studio and gallery to six artists, at 19 W. Bradford St. in Sonora.  “Temples of Nature” by Sherie Drake Painting courtesy of Sherie Drake As an artist, Sherie Drake said, “I am limited in representing the natural beauty of Yosemite. I did my best to depict the diversity of texture, moods and colors. It is by far the grandest of all places.” This painting is an example of fluid acrylic. A demonstration of this technique was shown in an interview conducted by a Comcast Cable 8 series “Artists of the Mother Lode,” hosted by Kimberly Francis on April 6th and 20th, 2012. Drake admires her own mentors and past art teachers, Chuck Walden, Bob Gerbracht and Michael Linstrom.
Yosemite, California, Spring 2013  Page Nine  The Gazette Gallery The Gazette Gallery  Featured Artist    Sonora artist Sh...
Page Ten YOSEMITE GAZETTE A Hike Along the History of Bagby By Sharon Giacomazzi Just off Highway 49, the site of Bagby lies 12 miles south of Coulterville and 16 miles north of Mariposa on the north bank of the Merced River at the head of Lake McClure. Not far from the graceful bridge over the river, a few rusted metal scraps and concrete foundations are the sole survivors of a Yosemite Valley Railroad (YVRR) station and a tiny town. Besides the location of a peaceful, satisfying hike, Bagby environs harbor deep, important Sierra Nevada history. From here, a seven-mile streamside walk on the abandoned railroad grade leads to the confluence of the North Fork Merced. In spring it’s a rowdy stream sprinting through a wild, narrow gorge down to the main stem Merced. If you’ve got the juice for a 14-mile round trip hike, go for it. However, it’s up to you how far to ramble on the nearly level route. rail line, nicknamed “The Shortline to Paradise.” If you’re partial to lonesome streamside walks in canyon environments, this is the place for you before snow melt raises the water level. During peak run-off, the old grade is inundated along the north side for a mile or so. Except for an occasional spike, faint tie shadows and trestle ruins, nothing remains to suggest the 38-year life of a rail line that carried passengers from Merced to Yosemite’s doorstep or at one time the site of the largest quartz mill in the state. Furthermore, there is not the slightest indication of a hydro plant that supplied power for the mill and Mariposa. From a ridge top about 12 miles out from Mariposa, the 1,000-foot corkscrewing drop into Hell’s Hollow, as it’s known locally, is utterly spectacular, even daunting Photograph by Sharon Giacomazzi Bagby Bridge—Highway 49 Looking north halfway between Mariposa and Coulterville,“The four-mile-long plunge into the heart of the Merced River canyon showcases a rich tapestry of classic Sierra foothill scenery and dazzles in spring when wildflowers strut their stuff.” As you proceed, which may be no farther than the old foundations, remind yourself it’s the journey that counts, not the destination. The once historic YVRR rightof-way alongside the river is ideal for hikers of all ages and abilities, providing a wonderful opportunity to explore a beautiful, rugged canyon. Offering an easy walk with plenty to see, it’s also a fine venue to introduce kids to the natural world. Railroad buffs will enjoy walking the former tracks of a very famous to flatland motorists. The hollow at the bottom of the chasm was named for its hot-as-the-hinges-of-hell summer temperatures. That hasn’t changed; keep that in mind if you decide to hike the canyon. The four-mile-long plunge into the heart of the Merced River canyon showcases a rich tapestry of classic Sierra foothill scenery. Although jaw-dropping any time of year, it dazzles in spring when wildflowers strut their stuff. The dance of light and shadow on seemingly endless Photograph courtesy of Sharon Giacomazzi Bagby—Formerly Ridley’s Ferry Milling operations were on the south side of the Merced River. Mules hauled the ore carts back up to the Pine Tree and Josephine Mine areas owned by John Fremont. A section of the 4.5 mile long tramway has been covered by present-day Highway 49. rolling hills is unique and stunning. Motorists might want to use a pull out to behold this gorgeous canyon topography in any season. Bagby was originally the location of Ridley’s Ferry, 1850-1859. Later, a dam and John C. Fremont’s water powered stamp mills were built here. Fremont, owner of the 44,000-acre Las Mariposas Land Grant, named it Benton Mills for his prominent father-in-law, Senator Benton of Missouri. Mining operations were on the south side of the river. Fremont’s fabulously rich Pine Tree and Josephine Mines, among the earliest in the Mother Lode, were opened about 1850. Ore was carried down a steep hillside by gravity cars on a 4.5-milelong tramway, built by Chinese laborers in just two weeks, to the milling operations on the south side of the Merced. Mules hauled the ore carts back up to the mine area. A section of the tramway was covered by present-day Highway 49. John C. Fremont, “The Pathfinder,” was at his finest in the wilderness and at his worst as a manager and businessman. He sold his rich holdings in 1863 to Mariposa Commercial and Mining Company who constructed a strong and massive dam of wood and iron. The Company also built a new mill that crushed 15 tons of ore daily. Still later, pioneer Benjamin Bagby built a store, hotel, saloon and boarding houses on the north side of the river. In 1897, when a post office was to be established, authorities discovered a mining town in Mono County had the same name of Benton. Instead, it was named Bagby. As the other small dams before it, the new one was no match for the Merced’s strong current and collapsed in 1921. After its fall, scavengers carted away the lumber, always a valuable resource. A year later a fire, always (Continued on Page 12) CAFE AT THE BUG Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner 0Fresh comfort foods with vegan & vegetarian options 0We source local, organic or sustainable when sensible 0Famil y style dining 0Folk/Bluegrass live music 0Right ab above a Health Spa 0Excellent for special events Worth the Trip Yosemite Bug Rustic Mountain Resort 6979A Highway 140 Midpines, CA 95345 YosemiteBug.com/Cafe For dail y menu go to Facebook or 866.826.7108 x6
Page Ten  YOSEMITE GAZETTE  A Hike Along the History of Bagby By Sharon Giacomazzi    Just off Highway 49, the site of Bag...
Page Eleven Yosemite, California, Spring 2013 High Volume for Search and Rescue (Continued from Page 1) and technical rescue specialists, First have six ambulances operating in Responders, EMTs, Paramedics, the park. We have our Clinic in the PA’s, nurses and medical doctors - all Valley for a wide range of urgent members of our team. These people care needs. Additionally we have a come together during an incident to communications trailer for a mobile provide the visitor with the highest level incident command post, a van for troop transport, and a Rescue truck of professional response available. Yosemite Gazette: How many that has room for 6 passengers and people are on the YOSAR team? a large quantity of equipment. Each District has a cache of SAR equipAre they all rangers? Ranger Hendy: The YOSAR ment specific to the needs of their   team is comprised of members of operational area. Yosemite Gazette: The Preventive the community, volunteers, and NPS employees from all through- Search and Rescue team has done a lot to educate visiout the park. Not tors as to the magall of them are nitude and safety Rangers. Their concer ns of the numbers vary by Half Dome trail. season and by Can you tell us how year, but in the PSAR works? summer of 2013   we should have Ranger Hendy: roughly 100 peoPSAR has several ple trained for facets all aimed SAR and EMS at educating the Photograph courtesy of NPS visitors before they operations park Ranger Lisa Hendy wide. embark on their Yosemite Gazetete: What are the journey. There is an online preshard resources that YOSAR has at ence through our blog and Faceit’s disposal? Helicopters, ambu- book pages. There are flyers posted lances, etc. throughout the park advising visitors Ranger Hendy: Our helicopter is of precautions they can take before available from May through Octo- heading out into the backcountry, ber. CHP has been a highly valued all of which have QR code links to cooperator as have Mercy Air and the blog. We will have volunteers PHI when aircraft are needed. We working throughout the summer, Photograph courtesy of National Park Service­­ —Dave Pope Photo Climber Rescue Drill Yosemite Search and Rescue technicians perform a climber rescue from the Royal Arches. For more SAR info: http://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/climbing_safety.htm roving campgrounds and visitors’ centers and busy trails to educate visitors with relevant information and help them choose their trail adventures. Additionally, we will be working with the Interpretation Division and Yosemite Conservancy to reach visitors during talks given in the evenings. Yosemite Gazette: I am often asked who pays for the helicopter rescues. Is it the Park (taxpayers) or is it private insurance? Ranger Hendy: If a private aeromedical aircraft is utilized, the visitor is responsible for costs incurred. Additionally, ambulance costs are the responsibility of the visitor. Whether insurance will cover the costs is dependent upon the insurance provider. As a general rule, most plans have provisions for emergency transport. Major SAR incidents which span multiple days or utilize a large number of rescuers and equipment incur considerable costs.   Yosemite Gazette: In April 2013, a nine-year old boy was saved from going over Vernal Fall. 2011 saw the tragic loss of three people who went over at the same time, despite warning signs and the safety fence. Do you have any suggestions that can help reduce these kinds of accidents?   Ranger Hendy: Stay on the trail, and realize the banks of the Merced River are extremely slippery. Even apparently calm water upstream of the falls has current, and the bottom of the river is too slippery to stand and recover once you fall in.   Yosemite Gazette: 2011 had 202 rescues involving 226 individuals. Can you give us a quick summary of the rescues your group participated in during 2012?   Ranger Hendy: In 2012 we had 215 rescues of 248 people. Yosemite Gazette:  Many SAR efforts begin with a visitor calling 9-1-1. Can you explain how the call gets routed and a response started? Ranger Hendy: A 911 call will route to the Yosemite Emergency Communications Center. Our dispatchers will then gather the relevant information from the reporting party and disseminate it to the supervisory ranger on duty in the appropriate district. That individual will then organize the appropriate response. Yosemite Gazette:  Thank you for your time and efforts on the behalf of all Americans. Any parting comments?   Ranger Hendy: Yosemite Emergency Services is proud to be available to serve the public in their time of need. However, we encourage everyone to take a few moments to evaluate their adventure plans in light of what it takes to stay safe in the park’s beautiful wilderness. For more tips on how to do so, visit our blog at: www. nps.gov/yose/blogs/psarblog.htm. 8 Editor’s Note: Yosemite Gazette correspondent, Rick Deutsch conducted this interview and he plans on continuing a series of interviews in future issues. He has written “One Best Hike: Yosemite’s Half Dome” and blogs at: HikeHalfDome.com. His email address: Ricky.Deutsch@gmail.com
Page Eleven  Yosemite, California, Spring 2013  High Volume for Search and Rescue  Continued from Page 1   and technical r...
Page Twelve YOSEMITE GAZETTE A Hike Along the History of Bagby (Continued from Page 10) a serpent in Sierra paradise, razed the powerhouse, some homes, and other structures. After the turn of the century, Bagby’s history became intertwined with the YVRR which operated from 1907-1945. After the rail line’s last run in 1945, Bagby was reduced to a skeletal population. Subsequently, it managed to hang on as a fisherman’s rustic resort until the new Exchequer Dam was completed in 1966. Then the waters of the Merced backed up into the canyon and created Lake McClure. Where a stamp mill once thundered and trains whistled and chugged, boaters now floated. Before flooding began, a turnable, twin water towers and quaint wooden Bagby Railroad Station were removed and relocated to El Portal by Yosemite National Park officials. After remodeling, the historic depot served as headquarters for the Yosemite Association, now Yosemite Conservancy. A sleek, streamlined new bridge, a monument to the little town’s existence, was ready for traffic in August 1966. All other structures and the old bridge were burned in 1966. The lake makers named it Bagby Recreation Area in memory of the drowned town and its important contribution to California history. Progress finally caught up with the former, bustling community on the Merced River. Benton Mills/Bagby sprang into life because of a dam built by Fremont; ironically, another dam doomed it to oblivion. There is a fee campground and day use area of the south side of the river operated by Merced Irrigation District. The camp is set in a small grove of oaks, once enjoyed by Bagby residents and visitors as a shady picnic site. A fee is also collected for launching a boat. Directions: Arriving from Sonora environs, do not cross the bridge. Instead, park on the south (right) side of the bridge in a large viewing area (there is a smaller spot on the opposite side). Cross the highway and walk downslope to river’s edge. You’ll need to rock hop across over a side stream to access the railroad grade. Before spring run off the water level is low enough to ford this creek without difficulty. Walk up the slope and you soon see the former Bagby site marked by concrete foundations. Hike upstream as far as time and energy dictate. Photograph courtesy of Sharon Giacomazzi Bustling Bagby—Benton Mills The bustling community before the waters of the Merced were backed up into the canyon and created Lake McClure. Where a stamp mill once thundered and trains whistled and chugged, boaters now float, launched from Bagby Recreation Area. Groveland Appraisal Services Located in the historic Big Oak Flat Post Office Rick Fox , SRA Certified RES #AR004651 P.O. Box 495 Groveland, CA 95321 209-962-7067 grovelandapp@mlode.com 209-878-0117 “HIDDEN GEM” – Sunset Magazine Combining a timeless feel with modern comforts, Evergreen Lodge is Yosemite’s premier mountain resort. Come see why Frommer’s Guide calls the Evergreen “the Classic Yosemite Experience”. Cabins • Restaurant • Tavern • Recreation www.evergreenlodge.com (800) 93-LODGE Located off Hwy 120 on Yosemite’s western border
Page Twelve  YOSEMITE GAZETTE  A Hike Along the History of Bagby  Continued from Page 10   a serpent in Sierra paradise, r...
Yosemite, California, Spring 2013 Page Thirteen Yosemite Tourism Creates Over $379 Million in Local Benefits Spending in surrounding communities supports over 5,000 jobs Open Daily (except Sunday) Full Breakfast Lunch (from eleven) Full Traditional Bakery Apples, Strawberries, Pears, Produce (in season) Expresso, Frappé, Smoothie Bar Apple & Pear Sauce, Jams, Jelly, (no preservatives) Cider (100% natural unfiltered) Train Rides (weather permitting) 19 1 Ch erokee R o ad 21 Tuolumne 209 - 9 2 8- 4 6 8 9 cov ersapp anch.com ler Bank with Confidence A recent National Park Service (NPS) report for 2011 shows that over four million visitors to Yosemite National Park spent over $379 million in communities surrounding the park. This spending supported 5,057 jobs in the local area. “Yosemite National Park is a wonderful place to visit and view awe-inspiring scenery,” said Don Neubacher, Yosemite National Park Superintendent. “We attract visitors from across the U.S. and around the world who come here to experience the park and then spend time and money enjoying the services provided by our neighboring communities and getting to know this spectacular part of the country, ” Neubacher added. “The National Park Service is proud to have been entrusted with the care of America’s most treasured places and delighted that the visitors we welcome generate significant contributions to the local, state, and national economies,” Neubacher commented. The information on Yosemite is part of a peer-reviewed spending analysis of national park visitors across the country conducted by Michigan State University for the NPS. For 2011, that report shows $13 billion of direct spending by 279 million park visitors in communities within 60 miles of a national park. Most visitor spending supports jobs in lodging, food, and beverage service (63%); followed by recreation and entertainment (17%); other retail (11%); transportation and fuel (7%); and wholesale and manufacturing (2 %). To download the report visit www.nature.nps.gov/socialscience/ products.cfm#MGM and click on Economic Benefits to Local Communities from National Park Visitation, 2011. The report includes information for visitor spending at individual parks and by state. To learn more about national parks in California and how the National Park Service works with communities to preserve local history, conserve the environment, and provide local recreation opportunities, go to www.nps.gov/California. 8 Editor’s Note: Of the four major “gateways” to Yosemite National Park, South Entrance (Highway 41, Oakhurst - Wawona) to Yosemite is the busiest of all four gates to the park, with up to 3,200 vehicles per day in peak season and almost 1/3 of all visitors to the park. I have monthly visitor statistics for 2012 for the four park entries and will present a report in the Summer issue. Mountain Home Gifts The best selection of Yosemite Art, Gifts and Cabin Accessories Tuolumne Me-Wuk Indian for over 30 years Health Center Now Accepting New Patients Medi-Cal, Medicare, CMSP and most private insurances accepted For services offered and locations of our health and dental centers visit www.tmwihc.org 18880 Cherry Valley Blvd. Tuolumne, CA 95379 209-928-5400 If you visit just one shop in Sonora, this is it! 87 S. Washington Street at the corner of Linoberg 209-533-5319
Yosemite, California, Spring 2013  Page Thirteen  Yosemite Tourism Creates Over  379 Million in Local Benefits Spending in...
Page Fourteen YOSEMITE GAZETTE Remembering Springtimes in Yosemite (Continued from Page 6) falls. They once both existed at the same level! Ice is the other form of water that continues to play a major role in the ongoing transformation of Yosemite. The gouging and scouring action of vast sheets of frozen water in the form of ancient glaciers have left their unmistakable signs everywhere. Water and ice are also responsible for the weathering action of Yosemite’s rock faces, where water seeps into the cracks of the rock and then freezes, expanding as it becomes ice. Over time, this wedging can break massive layers of rock away from the valley walls. It is another powerful geological force at work today. The Photograph courtesy of D. H. Hubbard Mom and “Tauie” Dad would sometimes bring home animals that needed a loving home for a while. Mom with “Tauie” the little orphan mule deer. Royal Arches behind the Ahwahnee Hotel is an example of this type of weathering in action. The sights and sounds of massive crashing “rock falls” in Yosemite is a reminder to a person of really how small and insignificant they are (just in case they had somehow forgotten)! The majesty and movement of Yosemite’s water instills a sense in a person that somehow this place is a living thing, and the massive rock formations support this feeling. It is recognized that water is constantly working on the geology that supports it where ever it is on this earth. If this is true, then why are there no other places like Yosemite? The answer is in the unique composition of Yosemite’s granite rock. During summer vacation, I would lie in the warm grass and watch the red tailed hawks soaring far above me. Eventually they would land at their nests on the valley walls. Often during those long and lazy days watching the hawks, I would wonder about the strange and wonderful shapes of the rocks. Little did I know then that the internal characteristic of the granite (its composition, grain size and chemistry) determined what rock remained after forces had sculpted the other rock away. Where the rocks were too strong to be fractured, the action of the water could not erode them, and the massive rock outcroppings and domes that we associate with Yosemite emerged. My father was the Chief Park Naturalist in Yosemite for almost 15 years, and with forest all around us animals were a regular part of our lives. Since park regulations did not allow cats or dogs to be kept, the wild animals were our “pets.” Spring was when the animals would re-emerge from their dens, hungry and looking for food after a long winter. Much to my mother’s unease, snakes were often captured over the years and brought into the house to live with us. (As a rule, she was more enthusiastic about the “furry and cute” animals that we kept.) As much as she would like to she will never forget the day when a big garter snake we had named “Christopher” escaped from the aquarium that had been his home. As I recall, he had been given his name, because like his namesake Christopher Columbus, he liked to explore. Exhaustive searches failed to turn up Christopher anywhere. After a while we accepted the fact that he had somehow found his way outside. That was until the day of my mother’s bridge party. Fortunately for us kids, things could have ended up much worse than they did. With all of the “wildlife” living with us in the house, Mom had become very good at spotting things that were out of place. With the numerous rattlesnakes that we encountered every summer, she was especially accomplished at spotting snakes. She did her best to remain calm while serving as the perfect hostess that day, with a careful eye constantly on Christopher. He was coiled up happily asleep beneath the chair of the Park Superintendent’s wife! Mom was the only one who noticed him and nothing disturbed him from his sleep. Christopher was released back to the wild that same day, immediately after the last guest had left. Photograph courtesy of D. H. Hubbard The Hubbard family, Yosemite (1966) Doug Hubbard (center) Chief Park Naturalist for almost 15 years, with his family, (left to right) David Hubbard, Joan, Janet, wife Fran and Doug Junior. Editor’s Note: David Hubbard (author of “Remembering Childhood Springtimes in Yosemite, p. 6, was born in Yosemite National Park where he lived with his family for 13 years. He later worked summers as a seasonal employee for the National Park Service while earning his degree in Recreation and Parks from Texas A&M University. During the summer of 1975 he was instrumental in launching the Living History Program at the Castillo de San Marcos National Monument in St. Augustine, Florida. In commemoration of the country’s Bi-Centennial, he portrayed a British “Private of the 60th Regiment of Foot.” David now lives in Oregon where he continues to pursue his interests in writing and photography, and is building a Yosemite-themed website at: www.undiscovered-yosemite.com. David’s blog at the National Park Foundation: http://www.nationalparks.org/connect/blog/my-father’s-storywwii-veteran-who-dreamed-working-nps Meadow in the Sky: A History of Yosemite’s Tuolumne Meadows Region The only book dedicated solely to the history of this region, it provide the story of • Native Americans, soldiers and sheepherders • Miners, geologists and surveyors • John Muir, the Sierra Club and the birth of Yosemite National Park • William Keith, the painter, and numerous other famous people who passed this way With maps and old photographs At local bookstores • AlbicaulisPress@yahoo.com One Best Hike: Yosemite’s Half Dome by Rick Deutsch, Mr Half Dome™ • Forward by Royal Robbins • Updated 2nd Edition • The only dedicated Half Dome guide • Covers history, geology, preparation • 193 pages; 120 photos • Gear checklist; trail information • 18 points of interest with mileage, altitude, elapsed time, GPS markers $14.95 plus tax at Yosemite, REI, Amazon, Outfitters and Bookstores HikeHalfDome.com FREE Half Dome app
Page Fourteen  YOSEMITE GAZETTE  Remembering Springtimes in Yosemite  Continued from Page 6   falls. They once both existe...
30992.pdf Yosemite, California, Spring 2013 http://digital.library.msstate.edu/utils/getfile/collection/SheetMusic/id/3... Page Fifteen Sing Along if You Can... or Just Toot “There’s a place that’s got me going. Where the breeze is blowing. In the Yosemite. I want to hurry to the place. It’s called Camp Curry” 30992.pdf http://digital.library.msstate.edu/utils/getfile/collection/SheetMusic/id/3... 100-Year Old Sheet Music Uncovered? 1 of 4 According to a notation on the website of Tom Bopp, “Vintage Songs of Yosemite,” the origins of the sheet music (to the right) began “scribbled on a piece of Camp Curry stationery, dated 1915, is a note from one L. G. Nattkemper, which he had pinned to a copy of his poem ‘Toot Your Horn For Camp Curry.’ It reads ‘...a talented musician set this to music and it is to be sung tonight. It sure sounds catchy & dandy.’ The ‘talented musician’ was Glenn Hood, who shows up on Curry concert programs as ‘Camp Curry's popular singer.’” 4/3/2013 2:54 PM “It’s object,” Bopp writes, “was to encourage motoring in Yosemite, and I’d say the song was a huge success.” “I am still looking for the original sheet music to Toot Your Horn for Camp Curry,” Bopp writes. The Yosemite Gazette obtained a copy of the sheet music from Ed Swanzey, a Columbia, California resident and musician who is in the process of rebuilding and restoring early 20th century music. Swanzey has also finished a book “Songs of Gold” a gold rush song book in which appear three songs that have never been published as sheet music before. 2 of 4 Chorus 4/3/2013 2:54 PM
30992.pdf  Yosemite, California, Spring 2013  http   digital.library.msstate.edu utils getfile collection SheetMusic id 3....
Page Sixteen Yosemite, California, Spring 2013 YOSEMITE GAZETTE Featured Yosemite Spring Photographer Born and raised in Croatia, Franka M. Gabler developed a fascination, admiration, and respect for nature. Soon after moving to California in 1997, she experienced her first wilderness backpacking trip in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Her main inspiration is nature; always evident in her work is the magnificence of California landscape, the everlasting change of the seasons, the simple and complex interaction of the water, rocks, sky, plants and wildlife of the high country.  Gabler’s photographs have been published in “Photographer’s Forum” magazine’s “The Best of Photogra- phy 2010” book, the “Yosemite Conservancy Magazine” and the “Yosemite Sierra Visitors Guide.” Her work has been featured in over 80 exhibits including those in Fresno, Oakhurst, Reedley, San Francisco, and Golden, CO. She is affiliated with the Stellar Gallery in Oakhurst and Spectrum Art Gallery in Fresno. Gabler currently lives in the Sierra foothills, in the small mountain town of Coarsegold, California. She has a career as a scientist and holds a Ph.D. in Plant Pathology. Visit her website at: www.frankagabler.com Photography courtesy of Mr. Half Dome, Rick Deutsch “I ran up and down Half Dome three times in one day.” Guess Which One of These Two? If you guessed Rick Deutsch, Mr. Half Dome and the Yosemite Gazette’s cub reporter (right), you guessed wrong. Catra Corbett (left) is an ultra marathon runner who has run the 212 mile John Muir Trail from Yosemite to Mt. Whitney and back holding the speed record for women on the trail, completing the 424 mile run in 12 days, 4 hours, and 57 minutes. Don’t miss a colorful interview of the “Dirt Diva” by Rick Deutsch in the upcoming Summer issue of the Yosemite Gazette. Subscribe now. Send in your subscription info below. This quartet of visitors to Ironstone Vineyards in Murphys, California couldn’t resist pausing to look over the Winter issue of the Yosemite Gazette in the springtime gardens. Ironstone is just one of over 100 venues where complimentary copies of the Yosemite Gazette are available. But why not insure regular delivery? Subscribe to the YOSEMITE GAZETTE One year, only $30—less than 50 cents a story. “Storm Over Half Dome” Photograph by Franka M. Gabler Franka M. Gabler discusses her photography, “Living not too far from Yosemite National Park enables me to go there often and capture the magnificent landscapes, both Yosemite icons and high Sierras in most dramatic conditions and best light: clearing storms, sunrises, sunsets, moonrises, alpenglow, reflections, etc. I took the “Storm over Half Dome” image in early May, just around sunset. I spent a whole day in Yosemite photographing dogwoods. I noticed clouds developing on the east side of the Yosemite Valley, late afternoon. Usually I go to the Valley View or Tunnel View to photograph Yosemite sunsets, since these locations are most accessible. This time I felt more adventurous and decided I wanted a different view. I quickly hiked along the North Wall of the Valley, just about across Bridalveil Falls, to capture this view.” “I used Nikon D800E with 24-70 mm F/2.8 Nikon lens. Exposure was 1/13 s at F/13 aperture. I used Lee graduated neutral density filter, to prevent blowing out of the highlights and still have detail in the shady foreground.” $50 for two years—$100 for five years Receive your copy of each issue delivered to your home or office by first class mail. Photocopy this and mail it to us with your check to P. O. Box 5227, Sonora, CA 95370-5227 You can also subscribe at our website YosemiteGazette.com Name ____________________________________ Address __________________________________ City ______________________________________ State _________ZIP_________________________ Email ____________________________________
Page Sixteen  Yosemite, California, Spring 2013  YOSEMITE GAZETTE  Featured Yosemite Spring Photographer Born and raised i...