A catalog of exhibitions on view at The Betsy - South Beach from December 2015 to March 2016, including works by Grace Hartigan, Judith Mason, Christopher Cozier, and more.

ART BASEL | MIAMI BEACH 2015 Cover: Christopher Cozier
ART BASEL   MIAMI BEACH 2015  Cover  Christopher Cozier
ART BASEL | MIAMI BEACH 2015 Cover: Christopher Cozier
ART BASEL   MIAMI BEACH 2015  Cover  Christopher Cozier
The Betsy - South Beach is pleased to present five collections for Art Basel | Miami Beach 2015. I IMAGINED A PAINTER PAINTING SUCH A WORLD HYAM PLUTZIK (1911-62) Like successive layers of leaf that dwindle the sunlight Are the overlapping cumulative shadows Projected by things, which huddle in them darkly Within the greater shadow: suffering. Breaching the shores of matter a swell of shadows Destroys all sanctions of formal separateness; And objects, transposed of vesture, take doubtful values Like hulks vaguely discerned under the tides. What inner or outer flames may shine are random In the one, shadowed sea where all things melt, While through all, the superior dark, the subjective night Encloses and bathes the universe. GRACE HARTIGAN: THE LATER YEARS (1990-2007) Grace Hartigan was an important participant in the Abstract Expressionist School of Art that emerged in NYC in the 1950s. Born in Newark, New Jersey in 1922, she moved to New York City in 1945, and became associated with several important artists who remained artistic allies: Milton Avery, Adolph Gottlieb, Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock, Larry Rivers, Helen Frankenthaler, Willem and Elaine de Kooning, Frank O’Hara, Barbara Guest, James Schuyler and other luminaries of the artistic and literary scene. The show is curated by Dr. Leslie King-Hammond. CHRISTOPHER COZIER: DARK CIRCLES (THE ARREST, PART 2) Our signature illuminated gallery hosts Christopher Cozier’s newest commission. A Trinidadian artist from Port of Spain, his work has been shown at the Brooklyn Art Museum, the Tate Liverpool and Kentucky Museum of Art, and the Eli Broad Museum at Michigan State University. A recipient of a Prince Claus Award, Cozier is commissioned for the 2nd time by The Betsy. REBUILDING THE CITY: AKA BLACK LIVES MATTER in Baltimore In our Underground Gallery, we are mounting a montage of engaging imagery from Christopher Metzger/ Kelli Williams Inside/Out exhibit, juxtaposed with images of municipal transformation from an exciting project called OpenWorks, an initiative mounted by the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation in Baltimore. The show is curated by Dr. Leslie King-Hammond. THE ARTISTS’ PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA The Artists’ Press exhibit (in BLT) includes Limited Edition Original Lithographs, Collector’s Editions and Artists’ Proofs from The Artists’ Press by four of South Africa’s noted artists: Judith Mason, Anton Kannemeyer, Claudette Schreuders, Espoir Kennedy, and Sam Nhlengethwa. All artists are represented in the print collections at the Museum of Modern Art, New York and/or at the National Museum of African Art, a Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC. Petra Mason curated The Artists’ Press exhibit. THE BEATLES AND ROLLING STONES: THE BOB BONIS ARCHIVE Betsy’s continuing partnership with NFA Galleries presents 200+ works discovered after the death of Bob Bonis, Road Manager of both rock groups during their first US tours. The film negatives were found after his death when they were sold to a band memorabilia dealer (Larry Marion), who has since created an engaging collection that has travelled the world to galleries, and published two catalogues/books. It’s become a Betsy tradition to open exhibitions with a reading of I IMAGINED A PAINTER PAINTING SUCH A WORLD, a poem written by my father, Hyam Plutzik. Take a moment to enjoy the poem on the facing page, as it offers yet another way to reflect on the power of images, and art. Jonathan Plutzik, Chairman The Betsy-South Beach Copyright by The Estate of Hyam Plutzik. All Rights Reserved.
The Betsy - South Beach is pleased to present five collections for Art Basel   Miami Beach 2015.  I IMAGINED A PAINTER PAI...
The Betsy - South Beach is pleased to present five collections for Art Basel | Miami Beach 2015. I IMAGINED A PAINTER PAINTING SUCH A WORLD HYAM PLUTZIK (1911-62) Like successive layers of leaf that dwindle the sunlight Are the overlapping cumulative shadows Projected by things, which huddle in them darkly Within the greater shadow: suffering. Breaching the shores of matter a swell of shadows Destroys all sanctions of formal separateness; And objects, transposed of vesture, take doubtful values Like hulks vaguely discerned under the tides. What inner or outer flames may shine are random In the one, shadowed sea where all things melt, While through all, the superior dark, the subjective night Encloses and bathes the universe. GRACE HARTIGAN: THE LATER YEARS (1990-2007) Grace Hartigan was an important participant in the Abstract Expressionist School of Art that emerged in NYC in the 1950s. Born in Newark, New Jersey in 1922, she moved to New York City in 1945, and became associated with several important artists who remained artistic allies: Milton Avery, Adolph Gottlieb, Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock, Larry Rivers, Helen Frankenthaler, Willem and Elaine de Kooning, Frank O’Hara, Barbara Guest, James Schuyler and other luminaries of the artistic and literary scene. The show is curated by Dr. Leslie King-Hammond. CHRISTOPHER COZIER: DARK CIRCLES (THE ARREST, PART 2) Our signature illuminated gallery hosts Christopher Cozier’s newest commission. A Trinidadian artist from Port of Spain, his work has been shown at the Brooklyn Art Museum, the Tate Liverpool and Kentucky Museum of Art, and the Eli Broad Museum at Michigan State University. A recipient of a Prince Claus Award, Cozier is commissioned for the 2nd time by The Betsy. REBUILDING THE CITY: AKA BLACK LIVES MATTER in Baltimore In our Underground Gallery, we are mounting a montage of engaging imagery from Christopher Metzger/ Kelli Williams Inside/Out exhibit, juxtaposed with images of municipal transformation from an exciting project called OpenWorks, an initiative mounted by the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation in Baltimore. The show is curated by Dr. Leslie King-Hammond. THE ARTISTS’ PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA The Artists’ Press exhibit (in BLT) includes Limited Edition Original Lithographs, Collector’s Editions and Artists’ Proofs from The Artists’ Press by four of South Africa’s noted artists: Judith Mason, Anton Kannemeyer, Claudette Schreuders, Espoir Kennedy, and Sam Nhlengethwa. All artists are represented in the print collections at the Museum of Modern Art, New York and/or at the National Museum of African Art, a Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC. Petra Mason curated The Artists’ Press exhibit. THE BEATLES AND ROLLING STONES: THE BOB BONIS ARCHIVE Betsy’s continuing partnership with NFA Galleries presents 200+ works discovered after the death of Bob Bonis, Road Manager of both rock groups during their first US tours. The film negatives were found after his death when they were sold to a band memorabilia dealer (Larry Marion), who has since created an engaging collection that has travelled the world to galleries, and published two catalogues/books. It’s become a Betsy tradition to open exhibitions with a reading of I IMAGINED A PAINTER PAINTING SUCH A WORLD, a poem written by my father, Hyam Plutzik. Take a moment to enjoy the poem on the facing page, as it offers yet another way to reflect on the power of images, and art. Jonathan Plutzik, Chairman The Betsy-South Beach Copyright by The Estate of Hyam Plutzik. All Rights Reserved.
The Betsy - South Beach is pleased to present five collections for Art Basel   Miami Beach 2015.  I IMAGINED A PAINTER PAI...
GRACE HARTIGAN: The Later Years (1990-2007) Curated by Dr. Leslie King Hammond IN THE LOBBY SALON Grace Hartigan (1922-2007) was a painter of fierce determination, intense passion and deep introspection who sought to define an aesthetic sense of self on her own terms. In an era that posed enormous difficulties for women and artists of color to be recognized by the mainstream art world, Hartigan emerged to become a painter whose creative voice would help to define a critical period of modern American art. Ironically, she became a model of tenacity and artistic success for the advances of the Feminist Movement. She led the fight for respect and recognition by living a model life, full of the challenges and risks that became a hallmark of her achievements in the mainstream art world. Born in Newark, New Jersey of Irish English descent, Hartigan grew up in a working class family. Her free spirited approach to life provoked alienation and the disapproval of her mother. Hartigan went on to study mechanical drawing at the Newark College of Engineering and later, during the 1940’s studied painting with Isaac Lane Muse. Hartigan’s internal world during the decade that followed is amplified in journals she wrote between 1951-1955, with reflections and observations that give voice to a chaotic yet cathartic creative journey that set the stage for greater things to come. “Picasso Woman” by Grace Hartigan “I perceive the world in fragments. It is somewhat like being on a very fast train and getting glimpses of things in strange scales as you pass by. A person can be very, very tiny. And a billboard can make a person very large. You see the corner of a house or you see a bird fly by, and it’s all fragmented. Somehow, in painting I try to make some logic out of the world that has been given to me in chaos. I have a very pretentious idea that I want to make life, I want to make sense out of it. The fact that I am doomed to failure — that doesn’t deter me in the least.”1 - Grace Hartigan Indeed, the impact of her artistic vision, an inventive mix of abstraction and figuration, emerged during the 1950’s when her paintings were included in the groundbreaking exhibition Talent 1950 at the Kootz Gallery, New York City. The stylistic range of these artists included Elaine de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, Robert Goodnough, Alfred Leslie, Joan Mitchell, Fairfield Porter, Robert Rauschenberg, and Larry Rivers. Thomas B. Hess, art critic and Managing Editor of Art News, noted that this was “one of the most successful and provocative exhibitions of younger artists”, that demonstrated a kind bravura of “graciousness, wit, reticence, sensibility, skill, cultivation, enthusiasm and painterliness”. By 1958, Hartigan was the only woman to be represented by the Museum of Modern Art exhibition: New American Painting which traveled to eight European countries and became a “leading representative” of what has become known as the second generation of Abstract Expressionist artists. In the 1960’s Hartigan married scientist Dr. Winston Price and moved to Baltimore, Maryland where Price was on faculty at the Johns Hopkins University. She became Graduate Director of the Hoffberger School of Painting in 1964 at the Maryland Institute College of Art and retired in 2008. Hartigan had a profound impact, mentoring and working with young painters and artists for nearly five decades. The Grimaldis Gallery has represented her work since 1979 and Professor Rex Stevens, a Hoffberger alumna, is now the executor of the Estate of Grace Hartigan. Hartigan continued throughout her career testing the expressive interplay and possibilities of figurative and abstract stylizations that focused on themes of popular culture. This was a deeply committed artist who loved and believed in a painter’s life, something she passionately and unapologetically shared with anyone in her presence. Grace Hartigan’s life and artistic legacy is centered at the crossroads of a pivotal moment in the development of the Abstract Expressionist movement and the legacy of American art in the twentieth century. The power and importance of her painting cannot be underestimated. 1 As quoted in Contemporary Artists: A-K (2002) by Sara Pendergast and Tom Pendergast Curator, Lesley King Hammond, PhD Art Basel at The Betsy - South Beach Miami, Florida, 2015
GRACE HARTIGAN  The Later Years  1990-2007  Curated by Dr. Leslie King Hammond IN THE LOBBY SALON Grace Hartigan  1922-200...
GRACE HARTIGAN: The Later Years (1990-2007) Curated by Dr. Leslie King Hammond IN THE LOBBY SALON Grace Hartigan (1922-2007) was a painter of fierce determination, intense passion and deep introspection who sought to define an aesthetic sense of self on her own terms. In an era that posed enormous difficulties for women and artists of color to be recognized by the mainstream art world, Hartigan emerged to become a painter whose creative voice would help to define a critical period of modern American art. Ironically, she became a model of tenacity and artistic success for the advances of the Feminist Movement. She led the fight for respect and recognition by living a model life, full of the challenges and risks that became a hallmark of her achievements in the mainstream art world. Born in Newark, New Jersey of Irish English descent, Hartigan grew up in a working class family. Her free spirited approach to life provoked alienation and the disapproval of her mother. Hartigan went on to study mechanical drawing at the Newark College of Engineering and later, during the 1940’s studied painting with Isaac Lane Muse. Hartigan’s internal world during the decade that followed is amplified in journals she wrote between 1951-1955, with reflections and observations that give voice to a chaotic yet cathartic creative journey that set the stage for greater things to come. “Picasso Woman” by Grace Hartigan “I perceive the world in fragments. It is somewhat like being on a very fast train and getting glimpses of things in strange scales as you pass by. A person can be very, very tiny. And a billboard can make a person very large. You see the corner of a house or you see a bird fly by, and it’s all fragmented. Somehow, in painting I try to make some logic out of the world that has been given to me in chaos. I have a very pretentious idea that I want to make life, I want to make sense out of it. The fact that I am doomed to failure — that doesn’t deter me in the least.”1 - Grace Hartigan Indeed, the impact of her artistic vision, an inventive mix of abstraction and figuration, emerged during the 1950’s when her paintings were included in the groundbreaking exhibition Talent 1950 at the Kootz Gallery, New York City. The stylistic range of these artists included Elaine de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, Robert Goodnough, Alfred Leslie, Joan Mitchell, Fairfield Porter, Robert Rauschenberg, and Larry Rivers. Thomas B. Hess, art critic and Managing Editor of Art News, noted that this was “one of the most successful and provocative exhibitions of younger artists”, that demonstrated a kind bravura of “graciousness, wit, reticence, sensibility, skill, cultivation, enthusiasm and painterliness”. By 1958, Hartigan was the only woman to be represented by the Museum of Modern Art exhibition: New American Painting which traveled to eight European countries and became a “leading representative” of what has become known as the second generation of Abstract Expressionist artists. In the 1960’s Hartigan married scientist Dr. Winston Price and moved to Baltimore, Maryland where Price was on faculty at the Johns Hopkins University. She became Graduate Director of the Hoffberger School of Painting in 1964 at the Maryland Institute College of Art and retired in 2008. Hartigan had a profound impact, mentoring and working with young painters and artists for nearly five decades. The Grimaldis Gallery has represented her work since 1979 and Professor Rex Stevens, a Hoffberger alumna, is now the executor of the Estate of Grace Hartigan. Hartigan continued throughout her career testing the expressive interplay and possibilities of figurative and abstract stylizations that focused on themes of popular culture. This was a deeply committed artist who loved and believed in a painter’s life, something she passionately and unapologetically shared with anyone in her presence. Grace Hartigan’s life and artistic legacy is centered at the crossroads of a pivotal moment in the development of the Abstract Expressionist movement and the legacy of American art in the twentieth century. The power and importance of her painting cannot be underestimated. 1 As quoted in Contemporary Artists: A-K (2002) by Sara Pendergast and Tom Pendergast Curator, Lesley King Hammond, PhD Art Basel at The Betsy - South Beach Miami, Florida, 2015
GRACE HARTIGAN  The Later Years  1990-2007  Curated by Dr. Leslie King Hammond IN THE LOBBY SALON Grace Hartigan  1922-200...
Grace Hartigan’s works are exhibited through the generosity of Rex Stevens, her former student, longtime friend, and personal representative who teaches on the faculty of Maryland Institute, College of Art. The value of these works was provided by Rex Stevens. Spanish Still Life, 2007 Pastel 30” x 24” $12,000.00 Still Life with Bottles, 2007 Pastel 30” x 24” $12,000.00 Margaret of Astonia, 2007 Pastel 30” x 24” $12,000.00 Scone Castle, 1994 Sumi ink + watercolor 25” x 30” $12,000.00 Toledo Still Life, 2007 Sumi ink + watercolor 34 1/2” x 26” $12,000.00 Picasso Woman, 2007 Pastel 34 1/2” x 27” $12,000.00 Madrid Still Life, 2007 Sumi ink + watercolor 34 1/2” x 26” $12,000.00 Mexican Cross, 2003 Sumi ink + watercolor 26” x 34” $12,000.00 Hat, 1990 Watercolor 25 1/2” x 34” $13,000.00 Woman with Cowl, 1996 Monoprint 30” x 22” $10,000.00 Grace Hartigan at 1701 1/2 Eastern Avenue Studio, 2003 Photograph by Walter P. Calahan NFS ABOUT THE CURATOR Bio of Dr. Leslie King Hammond, Betsy Senior Curator, on inside back cover. Photo of Grace Hartigan by Cecil Beaton, Courtesy of Rex Stevens
Grace Hartigan   s works are exhibited through the generosity of Rex Stevens, her former student, longtime friend, and per...
Grace Hartigan’s works are exhibited through the generosity of Rex Stevens, her former student, longtime friend, and personal representative who teaches on the faculty of Maryland Institute, College of Art. The value of these works was provided by Rex Stevens. Spanish Still Life, 2007 Pastel 30” x 24” $12,000.00 Still Life with Bottles, 2007 Pastel 30” x 24” $12,000.00 Margaret of Astonia, 2007 Pastel 30” x 24” $12,000.00 Scone Castle, 1994 Sumi ink + watercolor 25” x 30” $12,000.00 Toledo Still Life, 2007 Sumi ink + watercolor 34 1/2” x 26” $12,000.00 Picasso Woman, 2007 Pastel 34 1/2” x 27” $12,000.00 Madrid Still Life, 2007 Sumi ink + watercolor 34 1/2” x 26” $12,000.00 Mexican Cross, 2003 Sumi ink + watercolor 26” x 34” $12,000.00 Hat, 1990 Watercolor 25 1/2” x 34” $13,000.00 Woman with Cowl, 1996 Monoprint 30” x 22” $10,000.00 Grace Hartigan at 1701 1/2 Eastern Avenue Studio, 2003 Photograph by Walter P. Calahan NFS ABOUT THE CURATOR Bio of Dr. Leslie King Hammond, Betsy Senior Curator, on inside back cover. Photo of Grace Hartigan by Cecil Beaton, Courtesy of Rex Stevens
Grace Hartigan   s works are exhibited through the generosity of Rex Stevens, her former student, longtime friend, and per...
THE ARTISTS’ PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA Curated by Petra Mason JUDITH MASON SAM NHLENGETHWA IN BLT STEAK Curatorial Statement The Artists’ Press showcase at The Betsy Hotel’s Art Basel 2015 exhibition offers a rare opportunity to view a selection of limited edition lithographic prints outside The Artists’ Press remotely located Mpumalanga, South Africa studio premises, with the full range of the studio’s techniques including lithographs, monoprints and letterpress on display. The Artists’ Press owner and Master Printer Mark Attwood invites leading artists to collaborate in the studio and to publish limited editions. A longtime collaboration with artist William Kentridge forms part of the permanent collections at MoMA and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The Artists’ Press exhibition at The Betsy features Limited Edition Original Lithographs, Collector’s Editions and Artists’ Proofs from The Artists’ Press by four of South Africa’s noted artists: Judith Mason, Anton Kannemeyer, Claudette Schreuders, and Sam Nhlengethwa. All of the artists’ on display are represented in the print collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York and/or at the National Museum of African Art, a Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC. Petra Mason Curator, Art Basel at The Betsy - South Beach Miami, Florida, 2015 ANTON KANNEMEYER ABOUT THE CURATOR CLAUDETTE SCHREUDERS ESPOIR KENNEDY Cultural historian Petra Mason is part of The Artists’ Press family. Mason studied contemporary art history, painting, photography, and Romanesque and Gothic Art History in Florence, Italy. She has worked at The South African National Gallery in Cape Town, The Desre Resnick Gallery, and ran The Gallery on The Market in Johannesburg, South Africa. As an author, publisher, and creative director she’s produced numerous books for Rizzoli New York, UNIVERSE and Skira/Rizzoli and is a founding partner of Books & Books Press in Miami.
THE ARTISTS    PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA Curated by Petra Mason  JUDITH  MASON  SAM NHLENGETHWA  IN BLT STEAK Curatorial Stateme...
THE ARTISTS’ PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA Curated by Petra Mason JUDITH MASON SAM NHLENGETHWA IN BLT STEAK Curatorial Statement The Artists’ Press showcase at The Betsy Hotel’s Art Basel 2015 exhibition offers a rare opportunity to view a selection of limited edition lithographic prints outside The Artists’ Press remotely located Mpumalanga, South Africa studio premises, with the full range of the studio’s techniques including lithographs, monoprints and letterpress on display. The Artists’ Press owner and Master Printer Mark Attwood invites leading artists to collaborate in the studio and to publish limited editions. A longtime collaboration with artist William Kentridge forms part of the permanent collections at MoMA and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The Artists’ Press exhibition at The Betsy features Limited Edition Original Lithographs, Collector’s Editions and Artists’ Proofs from The Artists’ Press by four of South Africa’s noted artists: Judith Mason, Anton Kannemeyer, Claudette Schreuders, and Sam Nhlengethwa. All of the artists’ on display are represented in the print collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York and/or at the National Museum of African Art, a Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC. Petra Mason Curator, Art Basel at The Betsy - South Beach Miami, Florida, 2015 ANTON KANNEMEYER ABOUT THE CURATOR CLAUDETTE SCHREUDERS ESPOIR KENNEDY Cultural historian Petra Mason is part of The Artists’ Press family. Mason studied contemporary art history, painting, photography, and Romanesque and Gothic Art History in Florence, Italy. She has worked at The South African National Gallery in Cape Town, The Desre Resnick Gallery, and ran The Gallery on The Market in Johannesburg, South Africa. As an author, publisher, and creative director she’s produced numerous books for Rizzoli New York, UNIVERSE and Skira/Rizzoli and is a founding partner of Books & Books Press in Miami.
THE ARTISTS    PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA Curated by Petra Mason  JUDITH  MASON  SAM NHLENGETHWA  IN BLT STEAK Curatorial Stateme...
THE ARTISTS’ PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA Judith Mason Judith Mason was born in Pretoria, South Africa, in 1938. Mason is a technically disciplined artist working in traditional medium: oil, pencil, printmaking and mixed media. She has taught art at Scoula Lorenzo de Medici in Florence, Italy, Michaelis School of Fine Art at the University of Cape Town, at the University of the Witwatersrand, and privately. Her work is represented in South African national art collections and museums and internationally in private and public collections including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Yale University, The Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford, and the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art, Washington DC. Major public commissions include: The Man Who Sang, and the Woman Who Kept Silent aka The Blue Dress at The Constitutional Court in Johannesburg, South Africa. Justice Albie Sachs considers Judith Mason’s The Man Who Sang and the Woman Who Kept Silent (1998) to be “one of the great pieces of art in the world of the late 20th century”. The Paris Review recently published Judith Mason’s Self-Portrait Age 90; Mason’s work The Man Who Sang and the Woman Who Kept Silent was featured on the cover and as a lead story in Signs Journal published by University of Chicago Press. “I paint in order to make sense of my life, to manipulate various chaotic fragments of information and impulse into some sort of order, through which I can glimpse a hint of meaning. I am an agnostic humanist possessed of religious curiosity who regards making artworks as akin to alchemy. To use inert matter on an inert surface to convey real energy and presence seems to me a magical and privileged way of living out my days”. – Judith Mason Pomegranate I Eleven-Color Lithograph, Artist’s Proof 51 x 70 cm $4500 Pomegranate II Eleven-Color Lithograph, Artist’s Proof 51 x 70 cm $4500 Pomegranate III Eleven-Color Lithograph, Artist’s Proof 51 x 70 cm $4500 Lover’s Knot, 1994 Two-Color Lithograph 76 x 56 cm $5500
THE ARTISTS    PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA Judith Mason Judith Mason was born in Pretoria, South Africa, in 1938. Mason is a techn...
THE ARTISTS’ PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA Judith Mason Judith Mason was born in Pretoria, South Africa, in 1938. Mason is a technically disciplined artist working in traditional medium: oil, pencil, printmaking and mixed media. She has taught art at Scoula Lorenzo de Medici in Florence, Italy, Michaelis School of Fine Art at the University of Cape Town, at the University of the Witwatersrand, and privately. Her work is represented in South African national art collections and museums and internationally in private and public collections including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Yale University, The Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford, and the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art, Washington DC. Major public commissions include: The Man Who Sang, and the Woman Who Kept Silent aka The Blue Dress at The Constitutional Court in Johannesburg, South Africa. Justice Albie Sachs considers Judith Mason’s The Man Who Sang and the Woman Who Kept Silent (1998) to be “one of the great pieces of art in the world of the late 20th century”. The Paris Review recently published Judith Mason’s Self-Portrait Age 90; Mason’s work The Man Who Sang and the Woman Who Kept Silent was featured on the cover and as a lead story in Signs Journal published by University of Chicago Press. “I paint in order to make sense of my life, to manipulate various chaotic fragments of information and impulse into some sort of order, through which I can glimpse a hint of meaning. I am an agnostic humanist possessed of religious curiosity who regards making artworks as akin to alchemy. To use inert matter on an inert surface to convey real energy and presence seems to me a magical and privileged way of living out my days”. – Judith Mason Pomegranate I Eleven-Color Lithograph, Artist’s Proof 51 x 70 cm $4500 Pomegranate II Eleven-Color Lithograph, Artist’s Proof 51 x 70 cm $4500 Pomegranate III Eleven-Color Lithograph, Artist’s Proof 51 x 70 cm $4500 Lover’s Knot, 1994 Two-Color Lithograph 76 x 56 cm $5500
THE ARTISTS    PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA Judith Mason Judith Mason was born in Pretoria, South Africa, in 1938. Mason is a techn...
THE ARTISTS’ PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA THE ARTISTS’ PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA Sam Nhlengethwa Anton Kannemeyer Sam Nhlengethwa was born in Springs, South Africa in 1955 and studied at Rorke’s Drift and the Johannesburg Art Foundation. His work is represented in major public and corporate art collections world-wide including the National Museum of African Art; a Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC. Nhlengethwa has grown and adjusted the style and content of his works post-Apartheid to explore other themes such as music, specifically jazz, and the mechanics of everyday living. He lives and works in Johannesburg, South Africa. Anton Kannemeyer is the co-founder of Bitterkomix in South Africa. “D is for Dancing Ministers” is from the first prints that Kannemeyer did at The Artists’ Press, where he focused on images from his 2005 Alphabet of Democracy series, “J is for Jack Russell” and “D is for Dancing Ministers”. The initial reference is to childhood primers and illustrated alphabets, ‘letter-land’ gets political. The text on the prints reflects his obsession with hand typography and the style of the prints recalls his earlier silk-screens with the backgrounds of flat color. “The Alphabet of Democracy” is considered highly collectable and is an ongoing project. In the jazz series, artist Sam Nhlengethwa pays tribute to jazz performers. The prints are hand-printed on white Arches paper, with between 4 and 7 colors on each print. Nhlengethwa drew directly on ballgrained aluminum plates using Korns pencils and Tusche. “Jazz is rhythmic and it emphasizes interpretation rather than composition. There are deliberate tonal distortions that contribute to its uniqueness. My jazz collages, with their distorted patterns, attempt to communicate all of this. As a collagist and painter, fortunately, the technique allows me this freedom of expression… What I am doing is not new though, as there are other artists before me who painted jazz pieces. For example, Gerard Sekoto, Romare Bearden and Henri Matisse.” - Sam Nhlengethwa “Kannemeyer’s intensely personal response to the humiliations of his boyhood has since radiated out into a broader psychosexual, socio-historical critique of Afrikaner culture and South African society in general.” - From The Big Bad Bitterkomix handbook Alphabet of Democracy Series, 2006 D is for Dancing Ministers* The Jazz Series, 2002 Tribute to Sammy Davis Junior Five-Color Lithograph 76 x 106 cm $5500 Modern Jazz Quartet’s Last Concert Four-Color Lithograph x 106 cm 76 $5500 Dear Ella Fitzgerald* Six-Color Lithograph 75 x 106 cm $6500 *From an Edition of 35 prints, now sold out Lithographic Print 60 x 56 cm $3500 *From a sold out edition of 35, this was the first in the Alphabet of Democracy Series
THE ARTISTS    PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA  THE ARTISTS    PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA  Sam Nhlengethwa  Anton Kannemeyer  Sam Nhlengethwa...
THE ARTISTS’ PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA THE ARTISTS’ PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA Sam Nhlengethwa Anton Kannemeyer Sam Nhlengethwa was born in Springs, South Africa in 1955 and studied at Rorke’s Drift and the Johannesburg Art Foundation. His work is represented in major public and corporate art collections world-wide including the National Museum of African Art; a Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC. Nhlengethwa has grown and adjusted the style and content of his works post-Apartheid to explore other themes such as music, specifically jazz, and the mechanics of everyday living. He lives and works in Johannesburg, South Africa. Anton Kannemeyer is the co-founder of Bitterkomix in South Africa. “D is for Dancing Ministers” is from the first prints that Kannemeyer did at The Artists’ Press, where he focused on images from his 2005 Alphabet of Democracy series, “J is for Jack Russell” and “D is for Dancing Ministers”. The initial reference is to childhood primers and illustrated alphabets, ‘letter-land’ gets political. The text on the prints reflects his obsession with hand typography and the style of the prints recalls his earlier silk-screens with the backgrounds of flat color. “The Alphabet of Democracy” is considered highly collectable and is an ongoing project. In the jazz series, artist Sam Nhlengethwa pays tribute to jazz performers. The prints are hand-printed on white Arches paper, with between 4 and 7 colors on each print. Nhlengethwa drew directly on ballgrained aluminum plates using Korns pencils and Tusche. “Jazz is rhythmic and it emphasizes interpretation rather than composition. There are deliberate tonal distortions that contribute to its uniqueness. My jazz collages, with their distorted patterns, attempt to communicate all of this. As a collagist and painter, fortunately, the technique allows me this freedom of expression… What I am doing is not new though, as there are other artists before me who painted jazz pieces. For example, Gerard Sekoto, Romare Bearden and Henri Matisse.” - Sam Nhlengethwa “Kannemeyer’s intensely personal response to the humiliations of his boyhood has since radiated out into a broader psychosexual, socio-historical critique of Afrikaner culture and South African society in general.” - From The Big Bad Bitterkomix handbook Alphabet of Democracy Series, 2006 D is for Dancing Ministers* The Jazz Series, 2002 Tribute to Sammy Davis Junior Five-Color Lithograph 76 x 106 cm $5500 Modern Jazz Quartet’s Last Concert Four-Color Lithograph x 106 cm 76 $5500 Dear Ella Fitzgerald* Six-Color Lithograph 75 x 106 cm $6500 *From an Edition of 35 prints, now sold out Lithographic Print 60 x 56 cm $3500 *From a sold out edition of 35, this was the first in the Alphabet of Democracy Series
THE ARTISTS    PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA  THE ARTISTS    PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA  Sam Nhlengethwa  Anton Kannemeyer  Sam Nhlengethwa...
THE ARTISTS’ PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA THE ARTISTS’ PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA Claudette Schreuders Espoir Kennedy Claudette Schreuders is a South African sculptor whose carved and painted wooden diminutive figures reflect the ambiguities of the search for an ‘African’ identity in the post-apartheid era. Her sculpture is rooted in both Africa and Europe and she derives her inspiration for a number of sources including medieval church figures, West African carving and Spanish portraiture. Espoir Vyizigiro Kennedy was born on the 15th November, 1976 in Bujumbura, Burundi. He studied at Complexe Scolaire Congoleuse (Burundi), graduating in 2001 with a diploma in biology and chemistry. In 1996, he began to paint hair salon posters and shop signs for local business people, as well as landscapes for the tourist market in Burundi. When war broke out, his family fled the Burundi genocide and they now live in the Congo. In 2002, the artist came to South Africa and settled in Durban, where he paints banners and signs for South African salons. His “commands” come from all over South Africa and his work can be seen on pavements from Johannesburg and Carolina to Umtata and Estcourt. He has also been commissioned to do family portrait banners. Popular culture and iconography inspire him. Television personalities, movie stars, soccer players, musicians and politicians, as well as the simply stylish, are his preferred subjects. The first set of lithograph prints, “Crying in Public” in 2002 that Claudette Schreuders did at The Artists’ Press sold out almost immediately. The Three Sisters (2006) is sold out and is published in the book Claudette Schreuders published by Prestel. Narratives are essential to Schreuders. Through the origins of her stories, Schreuders often makes public that which is private. She continues to keep a record of her sculptures in lithographic form. Schreuders was commissioned to do four life size bronzes of South Africa’s Nobel Peace Prize Laureates, Nelson Mandela, Desmond Tutu, Albert Luthuli and F.W. de Klerk for the Waterfront in Cape Town that are on permanent display. (I paint) “because it is inside me, it is my life, a God-given talent.” - Espoir Kennedy “I start off by making thumbnail sketches, very loose simple drawings of what I want to make. And I usually draw my sculptures in groups. Or on small pieces of paper, or in my books. The drawings I do for my sculptures are very informal. And the prints I do are much more finished products.” - Claudette Schreuders The Three Sisters I, 2006 Five-Color Lithograph 76 x 49 cm $7000 The Three Sisters II, 2006 Five-Color Lithograph 76 x 49 cm $7000 The Three Sisters III, 2006 Five-Color Lithograph 76 x 49 cm $7000 Popular Icon Series, 2006 Mandela* Five-Color Lithograph 49.5 x 38 cm $2500 *From a sold out edition of 20
THE ARTISTS    PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA  THE ARTISTS    PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA  Claudette Schreuders  Espoir Kennedy  Claudette Sc...
THE ARTISTS’ PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA THE ARTISTS’ PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA Claudette Schreuders Espoir Kennedy Claudette Schreuders is a South African sculptor whose carved and painted wooden diminutive figures reflect the ambiguities of the search for an ‘African’ identity in the post-apartheid era. Her sculpture is rooted in both Africa and Europe and she derives her inspiration for a number of sources including medieval church figures, West African carving and Spanish portraiture. Espoir Vyizigiro Kennedy was born on the 15th November, 1976 in Bujumbura, Burundi. He studied at Complexe Scolaire Congoleuse (Burundi), graduating in 2001 with a diploma in biology and chemistry. In 1996, he began to paint hair salon posters and shop signs for local business people, as well as landscapes for the tourist market in Burundi. When war broke out, his family fled the Burundi genocide and they now live in the Congo. In 2002, the artist came to South Africa and settled in Durban, where he paints banners and signs for South African salons. His “commands” come from all over South Africa and his work can be seen on pavements from Johannesburg and Carolina to Umtata and Estcourt. He has also been commissioned to do family portrait banners. Popular culture and iconography inspire him. Television personalities, movie stars, soccer players, musicians and politicians, as well as the simply stylish, are his preferred subjects. The first set of lithograph prints, “Crying in Public” in 2002 that Claudette Schreuders did at The Artists’ Press sold out almost immediately. The Three Sisters (2006) is sold out and is published in the book Claudette Schreuders published by Prestel. Narratives are essential to Schreuders. Through the origins of her stories, Schreuders often makes public that which is private. She continues to keep a record of her sculptures in lithographic form. Schreuders was commissioned to do four life size bronzes of South Africa’s Nobel Peace Prize Laureates, Nelson Mandela, Desmond Tutu, Albert Luthuli and F.W. de Klerk for the Waterfront in Cape Town that are on permanent display. (I paint) “because it is inside me, it is my life, a God-given talent.” - Espoir Kennedy “I start off by making thumbnail sketches, very loose simple drawings of what I want to make. And I usually draw my sculptures in groups. Or on small pieces of paper, or in my books. The drawings I do for my sculptures are very informal. And the prints I do are much more finished products.” - Claudette Schreuders The Three Sisters I, 2006 Five-Color Lithograph 76 x 49 cm $7000 The Three Sisters II, 2006 Five-Color Lithograph 76 x 49 cm $7000 The Three Sisters III, 2006 Five-Color Lithograph 76 x 49 cm $7000 Popular Icon Series, 2006 Mandela* Five-Color Lithograph 49.5 x 38 cm $2500 *From a sold out edition of 20
THE ARTISTS    PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA  THE ARTISTS    PRESS, SOUTH AFRICA  Claudette Schreuders  Espoir Kennedy  Claudette Sc...
REBUILDING THE CITY: BLACK LIVES MATTER Commentary by Leslie King Hammond IN THE UNDERGROUND GALLERY Being The Change We Want to Make (Commentary on) REBUILDING THE CITY: AKA BLACK LIVES MATTER in Baltimore Artists are truth tellers which is why in places where people are not free to express themselves, governments fear what they will say - and what it might mean to others who are not as brave to speak their minds. We live in difficult times where on the one hand there is more labeling and experiential segmentation than ever, and on the other where through a video screen our lives are inextricably connected. Issues of entitlement juxtaposed against the reality of deprivation, it’s there for us all to see. Try to turn away, you just can’t. Consider the impact of violence perpetrated by one group of people in a particular place upon another. Our interconnected world guarantees that the acute pain felt prior only by the victimized group (in the absence of 24/7 TV) is now seen by all. But the pain isn’t diffused by this rippling out into a bigger world. Indeed its made more acute in the light of day. Chris Metzger’s brave project, carried out with students at one of the nation’s leading HBCU’s (Morgan State University), speaks loud and clear to the sense of pride young Black urban art students have for their city and their world. While born in Baltimore, the project links to the global voice of JR, and the 200,000 other artist voices around the world that recognize the power of images and their placement to communicate something even greater than what can be done (or said) with words. I was privileged to work with Chris, his students, and the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation to bring their project onto the street (for all to see), contextualizing the loop of negative video that was in perpetual play. And then imagine my joy in being part of the team that will birth Openworks, in that same space. The project used the concept of ‘Inside/Out’ as its mantra and mission. What I believe we’ve done with the development of the new Maker Space (Openworks) is to work in the other direction: “Outside/In”. We’re inviting art makers, creators, and appreciators to join hands, and to work together, inside a space where the future lives. Indeed, we can be the change we want to make. Leslie King Hammond, PhD Art Basel at The Betsy - South Beach Miami, Florida 2015
REBUILDING THE CITY  BLACK LIVES MATTER Commentary by Leslie King Hammond IN THE UNDERGROUND GALLERY Being The Change We W...
REBUILDING THE CITY: BLACK LIVES MATTER Commentary by Leslie King Hammond IN THE UNDERGROUND GALLERY Being The Change We Want to Make (Commentary on) REBUILDING THE CITY: AKA BLACK LIVES MATTER in Baltimore Artists are truth tellers which is why in places where people are not free to express themselves, governments fear what they will say - and what it might mean to others who are not as brave to speak their minds. We live in difficult times where on the one hand there is more labeling and experiential segmentation than ever, and on the other where through a video screen our lives are inextricably connected. Issues of entitlement juxtaposed against the reality of deprivation, it’s there for us all to see. Try to turn away, you just can’t. Consider the impact of violence perpetrated by one group of people in a particular place upon another. Our interconnected world guarantees that the acute pain felt prior only by the victimized group (in the absence of 24/7 TV) is now seen by all. But the pain isn’t diffused by this rippling out into a bigger world. Indeed its made more acute in the light of day. Chris Metzger’s brave project, carried out with students at one of the nation’s leading HBCU’s (Morgan State University), speaks loud and clear to the sense of pride young Black urban art students have for their city and their world. While born in Baltimore, the project links to the global voice of JR, and the 200,000 other artist voices around the world that recognize the power of images and their placement to communicate something even greater than what can be done (or said) with words. I was privileged to work with Chris, his students, and the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation to bring their project onto the street (for all to see), contextualizing the loop of negative video that was in perpetual play. And then imagine my joy in being part of the team that will birth Openworks, in that same space. The project used the concept of ‘Inside/Out’ as its mantra and mission. What I believe we’ve done with the development of the new Maker Space (Openworks) is to work in the other direction: “Outside/In”. We’re inviting art makers, creators, and appreciators to join hands, and to work together, inside a space where the future lives. Indeed, we can be the change we want to make. Leslie King Hammond, PhD Art Basel at The Betsy - South Beach Miami, Florida 2015
REBUILDING THE CITY  BLACK LIVES MATTER Commentary by Leslie King Hammond IN THE UNDERGROUND GALLERY Being The Change We W...
REBUILDING THE CITY: BLACK LIVES MATTER Commentary by William Holman, RW Deutsch Foundation Open Works & the evolution of a partnership to REBUILD THE CITY (Baltimore, Maryland) The Robert W. Deutsch Foundation donated seed funding to the Baltimore Arts Realty Corporation (BARCO), a 501(c)3 development company, in 2012 to create safe, affordable, and sustainable space for local creatives. BARCO purchased 1400 Greenmount Avenue in 2013, and is acting as the developer for the construction. BARCO is a public-private partnership. Before construction started in September 2015, the building was rented temporarily to an artists’ collective, FORCE, and a social enterprise, True North Guide Lab. Through the vision of Dr. Leslie King Hammond, Chris Metzger, and Kelli Williams approached BARCO for permission to install a Black Lives Mural Project in the immediate aftermath of the Freddie Gray incident and the Baltimore Uprising in April. Developers believed it was a wonderful use of the facade before construction began. In September, 2016, Open Works will open to the public as a 34,000 S.F community-facing makerspace, offering membership access to 7 different fabrication workshops, two classrooms, a computer lab, and 150 micro-studios. The new space will offer classes for youth, adults, and those with barriers to employment; small business services for those looking to turn their ideas into reality; and partnerships with universities, public schools, community groups, and government agencies to help distribute access to advanced manufacturing technology as broadly as possible. Imagery from Christopher Metzger/Kelli Williams Inside/Out exhibit, juxtaposed with images of municipal transformation from a project called OpenWorks, an initiative mounted by the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation in Baltimore.
REBUILDING THE CITY  BLACK LIVES MATTER Commentary by William Holman, RW Deutsch Foundation Open Works   the evolution of ...
REBUILDING THE CITY: BLACK LIVES MATTER Commentary by William Holman, RW Deutsch Foundation Open Works & the evolution of a partnership to REBUILD THE CITY (Baltimore, Maryland) The Robert W. Deutsch Foundation donated seed funding to the Baltimore Arts Realty Corporation (BARCO), a 501(c)3 development company, in 2012 to create safe, affordable, and sustainable space for local creatives. BARCO purchased 1400 Greenmount Avenue in 2013, and is acting as the developer for the construction. BARCO is a public-private partnership. Before construction started in September 2015, the building was rented temporarily to an artists’ collective, FORCE, and a social enterprise, True North Guide Lab. Through the vision of Dr. Leslie King Hammond, Chris Metzger, and Kelli Williams approached BARCO for permission to install a Black Lives Mural Project in the immediate aftermath of the Freddie Gray incident and the Baltimore Uprising in April. Developers believed it was a wonderful use of the facade before construction began. In September, 2016, Open Works will open to the public as a 34,000 S.F community-facing makerspace, offering membership access to 7 different fabrication workshops, two classrooms, a computer lab, and 150 micro-studios. The new space will offer classes for youth, adults, and those with barriers to employment; small business services for those looking to turn their ideas into reality; and partnerships with universities, public schools, community groups, and government agencies to help distribute access to advanced manufacturing technology as broadly as possible. Imagery from Christopher Metzger/Kelli Williams Inside/Out exhibit, juxtaposed with images of municipal transformation from a project called OpenWorks, an initiative mounted by the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation in Baltimore.
REBUILDING THE CITY  BLACK LIVES MATTER Commentary by William Holman, RW Deutsch Foundation Open Works   the evolution of ...
REBUILDING THE CITY: BLACK LIVES MATTER Photographer Christopher Metzger REBUILDING THE CITY: BLACK LIVES MATTER Commentary by Christopher Metzger IN THE UNDERGROUND GALLERY Answering JR’s Inside/Out with Black Lives Matter ABOUT THE ARTIST Christopher Metzger is an artist and educator, who earned an MFA in Photography and Digital Imaging from Maryland Institute College of Art. As a full time faculty member at Stevenson University, he teaches computer graphics and digital photography, with a strong focus on both the practical and theoretical use of technology by artists and designers. Critically, Metzger’s research ranges from hip hop culture and African American art to social and mass media. Over the past few years, he has become extremely inspired by the advancement and progression of mobile photography, the immediacy of online sharing and the software and hardware developed for mobile platforms. As an artist who engages the community through project based work, the accessibility of this technology is exciting creatively as he continues to explore how art can impact the community in positive ways. Conceptually, Metzger’s personal work deals with themes related to race, class, and identity, examining these broad ideas through both an historical and contemporary lens. On March 2, 2011, JR won the TED prize at the TED Conference in Long Beach, California, and called for the creation of a global participatory art project with the potential to change the world. This project is called Inside Out. Inspired by JR’s large format street “pastings.” Inside Out gives participants the opportunity to share portraits in order to make a statement about their personal values. It is a global platform for people to share their untold stories and transform messages of personal identity into works of public art. Each Inside Out group action around the world has been documented, archived, and exhibited online. To date, nearly 200,000 people from more than 112 countries & territories have participated. The Inside Out project has inspired group actions on varied themes such as hope, diversity, gender-based violence, and climate change. Organized by Morgan State University’s Visual Arts Department under the guidance of Chris Metzger and Kelli Williams, the Black Lives Matter Inside Out project is a visual response to the #BlackLivesMatter Movement. Created in 2012 after the murder of Trayvon Martin, the movement “[broadens] the conversation around state violence to include all of the ways in which Black people are intentionally left powerless at the hands of the state.” Part of French artist JR’s global participatory art project Inside Out, our group action aims to shed light on the presence of invisible boundaries and limitations placed on Black people throughout different facets of their lives. Following the release of the Inside Out documentary, which I shared with my classes as part of a larger discussion on the transformative power of art and social media, former student Kelli Williams and I decided to facilitate an Inside Out group action with students enrolled in my visual arts courses at Morgan State University. Under our guidance the students collaborated on the project by collectively defining the group message Black Lives Matter and followed through by planning and photographing a total of 42 individuals for a large-scale public art installation. The 42 portraits, comprised of 35 students, two faculty members, one alumni and one baby, were then wheat pasted onto the façade of a warehouse currently being renovated as a communal makerspace called Open Works. The portraits remained installed for three months until the elements finally took the piece down in early September. Given the recent events unfolding on college campuses around the country, I feel as though our project was a precursor to what we’re currently witnessing here in America. Whether it’s the #BlackLivesMatter movement, or another movement, it’s empowering to see students realizing that they have the power to effect change locally in their communities, as well as on a larger scale nationally. With social media as their platform, these movements have become more visible and widespread and people are able to mobilize quickly and organize marches or protests much more effectively. We no longer read about a police officer killing an unarmed Black man, we can actually watch it on our phones. I think this immediacy and access is important to these movements and you saw this happen with the uprising here in Baltimore. We were actually able to see contradictory views of the same event happen before our eyes, immediately.
REBUILDING THE CITY  BLACK LIVES MATTER Photographer Christopher Metzger  REBUILDING THE CITY  BLACK LIVES MATTER Commenta...
REBUILDING THE CITY: BLACK LIVES MATTER Photographer Christopher Metzger REBUILDING THE CITY: BLACK LIVES MATTER Commentary by Christopher Metzger IN THE UNDERGROUND GALLERY Answering JR’s Inside/Out with Black Lives Matter ABOUT THE ARTIST Christopher Metzger is an artist and educator, who earned an MFA in Photography and Digital Imaging from Maryland Institute College of Art. As a full time faculty member at Stevenson University, he teaches computer graphics and digital photography, with a strong focus on both the practical and theoretical use of technology by artists and designers. Critically, Metzger’s research ranges from hip hop culture and African American art to social and mass media. Over the past few years, he has become extremely inspired by the advancement and progression of mobile photography, the immediacy of online sharing and the software and hardware developed for mobile platforms. As an artist who engages the community through project based work, the accessibility of this technology is exciting creatively as he continues to explore how art can impact the community in positive ways. Conceptually, Metzger’s personal work deals with themes related to race, class, and identity, examining these broad ideas through both an historical and contemporary lens. On March 2, 2011, JR won the TED prize at the TED Conference in Long Beach, California, and called for the creation of a global participatory art project with the potential to change the world. This project is called Inside Out. Inspired by JR’s large format street “pastings.” Inside Out gives participants the opportunity to share portraits in order to make a statement about their personal values. It is a global platform for people to share their untold stories and transform messages of personal identity into works of public art. Each Inside Out group action around the world has been documented, archived, and exhibited online. To date, nearly 200,000 people from more than 112 countries & territories have participated. The Inside Out project has inspired group actions on varied themes such as hope, diversity, gender-based violence, and climate change. Organized by Morgan State University’s Visual Arts Department under the guidance of Chris Metzger and Kelli Williams, the Black Lives Matter Inside Out project is a visual response to the #BlackLivesMatter Movement. Created in 2012 after the murder of Trayvon Martin, the movement “[broadens] the conversation around state violence to include all of the ways in which Black people are intentionally left powerless at the hands of the state.” Part of French artist JR’s global participatory art project Inside Out, our group action aims to shed light on the presence of invisible boundaries and limitations placed on Black people throughout different facets of their lives. Following the release of the Inside Out documentary, which I shared with my classes as part of a larger discussion on the transformative power of art and social media, former student Kelli Williams and I decided to facilitate an Inside Out group action with students enrolled in my visual arts courses at Morgan State University. Under our guidance the students collaborated on the project by collectively defining the group message Black Lives Matter and followed through by planning and photographing a total of 42 individuals for a large-scale public art installation. The 42 portraits, comprised of 35 students, two faculty members, one alumni and one baby, were then wheat pasted onto the façade of a warehouse currently being renovated as a communal makerspace called Open Works. The portraits remained installed for three months until the elements finally took the piece down in early September. Given the recent events unfolding on college campuses around the country, I feel as though our project was a precursor to what we’re currently witnessing here in America. Whether it’s the #BlackLivesMatter movement, or another movement, it’s empowering to see students realizing that they have the power to effect change locally in their communities, as well as on a larger scale nationally. With social media as their platform, these movements have become more visible and widespread and people are able to mobilize quickly and organize marches or protests much more effectively. We no longer read about a police officer killing an unarmed Black man, we can actually watch it on our phones. I think this immediacy and access is important to these movements and you saw this happen with the uprising here in Baltimore. We were actually able to see contradictory views of the same event happen before our eyes, immediately.
REBUILDING THE CITY  BLACK LIVES MATTER Photographer Christopher Metzger  REBUILDING THE CITY  BLACK LIVES MATTER Commenta...
(Metzger Commentary, Continued) During the time we proposed, conceptualized, and executed the project, Freddie Gray died while in police custody, protests erupted in Baltimore, and on June 17th, our first day of installation, nine people were murdered in Charleston, South Carolina in a racially motivated terrorist attack. These deaths, along with countless others prior to, during, and after the conclusion of our project, unfortunately speaks to the relevance of the work and the current racial climate here in America and around the world. Although saddened and disturbed by the continued use of deadly force by police and others, we are hopeful that our project adds to the growing awareness of police brutality and the value of Black life, locally, nationally, and globally. It’s our hope that a public piece of this scale helps to spark conversations, and whether we agree or disagree, we’re at least opening up a dialogue regarding race relations here in Baltimore, across the country, and abroad. Christopher Metzger, Artist Art Basel at The Betsy - South Beach Miami, FL - 2015
 Metzger Commentary, Continued  During the time we proposed, conceptualized, and executed the project, Freddie Gray died w...
(Metzger Commentary, Continued) During the time we proposed, conceptualized, and executed the project, Freddie Gray died while in police custody, protests erupted in Baltimore, and on June 17th, our first day of installation, nine people were murdered in Charleston, South Carolina in a racially motivated terrorist attack. These deaths, along with countless others prior to, during, and after the conclusion of our project, unfortunately speaks to the relevance of the work and the current racial climate here in America and around the world. Although saddened and disturbed by the continued use of deadly force by police and others, we are hopeful that our project adds to the growing awareness of police brutality and the value of Black life, locally, nationally, and globally. It’s our hope that a public piece of this scale helps to spark conversations, and whether we agree or disagree, we’re at least opening up a dialogue regarding race relations here in Baltimore, across the country, and abroad. Christopher Metzger, Artist Art Basel at The Betsy - South Beach Miami, FL - 2015
 Metzger Commentary, Continued  During the time we proposed, conceptualized, and executed the project, Freddie Gray died w...
DARK CIRCLES (THE ARREST, PART 2) by Christopher Cozier IN THE GALLERY ( B BAR) ABOUT THE ARTIST Excerpts from “‘Put Your Hand in the Air:’ Caribbean Cultural Contradictions in Christopher Cozier’s The Arrest” written by Lara Stein Pardo and published in Transition, no.115 (2014), pgs. 154-163 . . . The Arrest portrays multiple layered stories, beginning with the title. On one level, the full title of the work—The Arrest: hands up, hands out—mirrors police directives to put one’s hands out for the clasping of handcuffs, or to put one’s hands up to reveal what one might be hiding. The visual elements in the piece reflect this through the pen markings, which look like barbed wire. The reference to police arrest and barbed wire reflects a central idea of the piece, that of social control. The Arrest also complicates the idea of social control, making it not simply the domain of police, but of cultural forms as well. . . . On another level, the title of the work refers to cultural and societal “arrest.” In addition to police arrest and violence, Cozier refers to a gripping and holding of people—a figurative arrest more than a literal arrest. Through depictions of gas pumps and snakes, Cozier references societal issues arising from the oil economy in Trinidad and Tobago. According to Cozier, the oil economy has produced a culture of excess, along with violence and suppression. Consequently, there are constant feelings of mistrust in the government, and while some people profit from the money in oil, many in Trinidad and Tobago are struggling to eke out a living. In this way, “the arrest” also means the arrest of society because of the way that violence and suppression have become imbedded into this Caribbean country, imposing a feeling of unrest and constriction, similar to other countries with oil-driven economies (such as Venezuela and Nigeria). These feelings of constraint, however, collide with internal and external narratives of the Caribbean as a real and imagined space that is characterized by the jovial spirit of culture. Whether this is a lived reality or not, the ideas are perpetuated through music, television, movies, art, and tourism: an imagined space where the water is always blue, the people are always happy, and the music never stops . . . [1] Used with permission of the author, Lara Stein Pardo, these are excerpts from “Put Your Hand in the Air:” Caribbean Cultural Contradictions in Christopher Cozier’s The Arrest, Transition, no. 115 (2014): 154-163. While content was written about Cozier’s first iteration of The Arrest, commissioned by The Betsy for Art Basel 2013, it provides a baseline for understanding the current work: The Arrest: Part Two, commissioned for Basel 2015. Dr. Lara Stein Pardo is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Laboratory for Race and Popular Culture and Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Christopher Cozier is an artist, writer, and curator who lives in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. Born in Trinidad, Cozier’s approach to art-making and cultural work takes a broad focus on the Caribbean region, as well as the region’s global relationships. In his artwork, Cozier challenges societal beliefs and practices by calling attention to the contradictions in Caribbean society, such as disparities in wealth and education. His artwork has been shown in numerous venues, including the Havana Biennial, Tate Liverpool, and the Brooklyn Museum. Recently, he was honored with the 2013 Prince Klaus Fund Award, not only for his art production, but also for employing a dynamic and often collaborative art practice that champions social change. Cozier is one of the founders and co-director of Alice Yard, an arts space in Port of Spain that has been in operation for seven years. In the space of the yard—a concrete area with two structures behind the home of the great-grandmother of one of the co-founders—they organize and host arts events, including exhibitions, literary readings, musician and artist residences, and cultural dialogues. “The Arrest” continues Cozier’s investigation and representation of Caribbean life and contradictions through a nonlinear narrative that opens the door for expansive analysis and reflection. By telling this story of Caribbean life in disjointed narratives, within individual works and across his body of work, Cozier’s art practice is in dialogue with notions of Afrofuturism as a way of grappling with multiple and sometimes divergent stories. The Collection is available for purchase, as a complete collection or by image. 26 pieces; 2 editions Edition 1 of 2, set of 26 filaments $25,000 Edition 2 of 2, individual filaments $1,500 each Photo courtesy Mark Lyndersay
DARK CIRCLES  THE ARREST, PART 2  by Christopher Cozier IN THE GALLERY   B BAR  ABOUT THE ARTIST  Excerpts from       Put ...
DARK CIRCLES (THE ARREST, PART 2) by Christopher Cozier IN THE GALLERY ( B BAR) ABOUT THE ARTIST Excerpts from “‘Put Your Hand in the Air:’ Caribbean Cultural Contradictions in Christopher Cozier’s The Arrest” written by Lara Stein Pardo and published in Transition, no.115 (2014), pgs. 154-163 . . . The Arrest portrays multiple layered stories, beginning with the title. On one level, the full title of the work—The Arrest: hands up, hands out—mirrors police directives to put one’s hands out for the clasping of handcuffs, or to put one’s hands up to reveal what one might be hiding. The visual elements in the piece reflect this through the pen markings, which look like barbed wire. The reference to police arrest and barbed wire reflects a central idea of the piece, that of social control. The Arrest also complicates the idea of social control, making it not simply the domain of police, but of cultural forms as well. . . . On another level, the title of the work refers to cultural and societal “arrest.” In addition to police arrest and violence, Cozier refers to a gripping and holding of people—a figurative arrest more than a literal arrest. Through depictions of gas pumps and snakes, Cozier references societal issues arising from the oil economy in Trinidad and Tobago. According to Cozier, the oil economy has produced a culture of excess, along with violence and suppression. Consequently, there are constant feelings of mistrust in the government, and while some people profit from the money in oil, many in Trinidad and Tobago are struggling to eke out a living. In this way, “the arrest” also means the arrest of society because of the way that violence and suppression have become imbedded into this Caribbean country, imposing a feeling of unrest and constriction, similar to other countries with oil-driven economies (such as Venezuela and Nigeria). These feelings of constraint, however, collide with internal and external narratives of the Caribbean as a real and imagined space that is characterized by the jovial spirit of culture. Whether this is a lived reality or not, the ideas are perpetuated through music, television, movies, art, and tourism: an imagined space where the water is always blue, the people are always happy, and the music never stops . . . [1] Used with permission of the author, Lara Stein Pardo, these are excerpts from “Put Your Hand in the Air:” Caribbean Cultural Contradictions in Christopher Cozier’s The Arrest, Transition, no. 115 (2014): 154-163. While content was written about Cozier’s first iteration of The Arrest, commissioned by The Betsy for Art Basel 2013, it provides a baseline for understanding the current work: The Arrest: Part Two, commissioned for Basel 2015. Dr. Lara Stein Pardo is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Laboratory for Race and Popular Culture and Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Christopher Cozier is an artist, writer, and curator who lives in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. Born in Trinidad, Cozier’s approach to art-making and cultural work takes a broad focus on the Caribbean region, as well as the region’s global relationships. In his artwork, Cozier challenges societal beliefs and practices by calling attention to the contradictions in Caribbean society, such as disparities in wealth and education. His artwork has been shown in numerous venues, including the Havana Biennial, Tate Liverpool, and the Brooklyn Museum. Recently, he was honored with the 2013 Prince Klaus Fund Award, not only for his art production, but also for employing a dynamic and often collaborative art practice that champions social change. Cozier is one of the founders and co-director of Alice Yard, an arts space in Port of Spain that has been in operation for seven years. In the space of the yard—a concrete area with two structures behind the home of the great-grandmother of one of the co-founders—they organize and host arts events, including exhibitions, literary readings, musician and artist residences, and cultural dialogues. “The Arrest” continues Cozier’s investigation and representation of Caribbean life and contradictions through a nonlinear narrative that opens the door for expansive analysis and reflection. By telling this story of Caribbean life in disjointed narratives, within individual works and across his body of work, Cozier’s art practice is in dialogue with notions of Afrofuturism as a way of grappling with multiple and sometimes divergent stories. The Collection is available for purchase, as a complete collection or by image. 26 pieces; 2 editions Edition 1 of 2, set of 26 filaments $25,000 Edition 2 of 2, individual filaments $1,500 each Photo courtesy Mark Lyndersay
DARK CIRCLES  THE ARREST, PART 2  by Christopher Cozier IN THE GALLERY   B BAR  ABOUT THE ARTIST  Excerpts from       Put ...
DARK CIRCLES (THE ARREST, PART 2) Commentary by Christopher Cozier “For what reason did you go and look in the Hall of the Machines, Freder?” I. II. III. IV. Feels like a dead planet made from a blob of ink and rubbed-in-carbon. A dystopic gear-wheel-like-form; part of some kind of slow motion engine, a corporate ‘social engine’ older than we can imagine. Like that saw we made from bottle caps and crown-corks, that saw-like blade. An other-world seen in the shiny terrazzo patterns which felt like maps or views of earth from the Apollo space-crafts; “terrazzo reflections/dramas”. The patterns on the floor describes a turbulent space; a mental or social condition: a/k/a the big wheels of the current social and economic space. The boom and bust of the oil, blood, and cash flow:  current economies.  A micro macro “Zabriskie Point” explosion scene. So, it’s really a conversation about the on-going turbulence of fossil fuel futures, - this big bang and unfolding of flying fragments?  So the thing, the exchange that makes all of this possible is also that which makes it vulnerable and unstable. So think also of the “starship” of middle class consumer aspirations. The “enterprise” was it illThe “Enterprise,” then, is not so much about a right, but a privilege, sought, bought or arrived at … and now no more than an enclosed and less porous fated or not really widely zone.   So, these little refitted vans and pick-ups are now hearses, delivering available/distributed? (CC) bodies for the recently departed.  They are no longer carrying consumer goods from the port.  This is a new special delivery, a new exchange in the old big engine. Christopher Cozier, Artist Art Basel at The Betsy - South Beach Miami, Florida  - 2015 Artist’s notes in Cozier’s own hand.
DARK CIRCLES  THE ARREST, PART 2  Commentary by Christopher Cozier    For what reason did you go and look in the Hall of t...
DARK CIRCLES (THE ARREST, PART 2) Commentary by Christopher Cozier “For what reason did you go and look in the Hall of the Machines, Freder?” I. II. III. IV. Feels like a dead planet made from a blob of ink and rubbed-in-carbon. A dystopic gear-wheel-like-form; part of some kind of slow motion engine, a corporate ‘social engine’ older than we can imagine. Like that saw we made from bottle caps and crown-corks, that saw-like blade. An other-world seen in the shiny terrazzo patterns which felt like maps or views of earth from the Apollo space-crafts; “terrazzo reflections/dramas”. The patterns on the floor describes a turbulent space; a mental or social condition: a/k/a the big wheels of the current social and economic space. The boom and bust of the oil, blood, and cash flow:  current economies.  A micro macro “Zabriskie Point” explosion scene. So, it’s really a conversation about the on-going turbulence of fossil fuel futures, - this big bang and unfolding of flying fragments?  So the thing, the exchange that makes all of this possible is also that which makes it vulnerable and unstable. So think also of the “starship” of middle class consumer aspirations. The “enterprise” was it illThe “Enterprise,” then, is not so much about a right, but a privilege, sought, bought or arrived at … and now no more than an enclosed and less porous fated or not really widely zone.   So, these little refitted vans and pick-ups are now hearses, delivering available/distributed? (CC) bodies for the recently departed.  They are no longer carrying consumer goods from the port.  This is a new special delivery, a new exchange in the old big engine. Christopher Cozier, Artist Art Basel at The Betsy - South Beach Miami, Florida  - 2015 Artist’s notes in Cozier’s own hand.
DARK CIRCLES  THE ARREST, PART 2  Commentary by Christopher Cozier    For what reason did you go and look in the Hall of t...
THE LOST BEATLES AND ROLLING STONES PHOTOGRAPHS: The Bob Bonis Archive IN THE HALLS The Betsy Hotel, in partnership with Larry Marion, Director and Founder of Not Fade Away Gallery, proudly presents an exciting new collection of rare images by Bob Bonis, U.S. Tour Manager for The Beatles and The Rolling Stones from 1964 to 1966. The images were shot at a key period in the careers of two of the most influential bands in rock history. As U.S. Tour Manager for both bands, Mr. Bonis had an unprecedented level of direct, personal access to these rising superstars, earning their trust and complete confidence during the early days of the British Invasion and Beatlemania – a critical point of their careers. During his tenure, Bonis took over 800 photographs of The Beatles and over 2,600 of The Rolling Stones - iconic images of them on stage, backstage during their most intimate moments, traveling, recording, at press conferences, even at home. ABOUT THE ARTIST Bob Bonis (1932-1992) began his career in the music business as a talent agent at MCA in New York City in the late 1950s and through a series of fortuitous circumstances, went on to hold an extraordinary position at a pivotal time in rock history – U.S. Tour Manager for both The Beatles and The Rolling Stones for their first U.S. tours in 1964 and continuing through 1966. Sixteen years after Bob’s passing in 1992, his son, Alex, unearthed this time capsule of images and found rock memorabilia expert Larry Marion, who had wide ranging experience with Beatles memorabilia. Now in homage to Bonis’ legacy and talent, NotFadeAwayGallery.com and The Betsy present more than 200 images from the newly discovered archives. Prints are for sale, as well as copies of two books, “The Lost Rolling Stones Photographs: The Bob Bonis Archive 1964-1966” and “The Lost Beatles Photographs: The Bob Bonis Archive 1964-1965” (Larry Marion, Harper Collins).
THE LOST BEATLES AND ROLLING STONES PHOTOGRAPHS  The Bob Bonis Archive IN THE HALLS The Betsy Hotel, in partnership with L...
THE LOST BEATLES AND ROLLING STONES PHOTOGRAPHS: The Bob Bonis Archive IN THE HALLS The Betsy Hotel, in partnership with Larry Marion, Director and Founder of Not Fade Away Gallery, proudly presents an exciting new collection of rare images by Bob Bonis, U.S. Tour Manager for The Beatles and The Rolling Stones from 1964 to 1966. The images were shot at a key period in the careers of two of the most influential bands in rock history. As U.S. Tour Manager for both bands, Mr. Bonis had an unprecedented level of direct, personal access to these rising superstars, earning their trust and complete confidence during the early days of the British Invasion and Beatlemania – a critical point of their careers. During his tenure, Bonis took over 800 photographs of The Beatles and over 2,600 of The Rolling Stones - iconic images of them on stage, backstage during their most intimate moments, traveling, recording, at press conferences, even at home. ABOUT THE ARTIST Bob Bonis (1932-1992) began his career in the music business as a talent agent at MCA in New York City in the late 1950s and through a series of fortuitous circumstances, went on to hold an extraordinary position at a pivotal time in rock history – U.S. Tour Manager for both The Beatles and The Rolling Stones for their first U.S. tours in 1964 and continuing through 1966. Sixteen years after Bob’s passing in 1992, his son, Alex, unearthed this time capsule of images and found rock memorabilia expert Larry Marion, who had wide ranging experience with Beatles memorabilia. Now in homage to Bonis’ legacy and talent, NotFadeAwayGallery.com and The Betsy present more than 200 images from the newly discovered archives. Prints are for sale, as well as copies of two books, “The Lost Rolling Stones Photographs: The Bob Bonis Archive 1964-1966” and “The Lost Beatles Photographs: The Bob Bonis Archive 1964-1965” (Larry Marion, Harper Collins).
THE LOST BEATLES AND ROLLING STONES PHOTOGRAPHS  The Bob Bonis Archive IN THE HALLS The Betsy Hotel, in partnership with L...
The Betsy’s Visual Arts Team Art Basel 2015 Senior Curator Dr. Leslie King-Hammond served as Dean of Graduate Studies at Maryland Institute College of Art for over 30 years, retiring as Dean Emeritus, just last year. Dr. Hammond is currently a Senior Fellow at the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation in Baltimore and has been the Visual Arts Ambassador for The Betsy-South Beach since 2009. In the spring of 2006 King-Hammond was appointed Chairperson of the Collections and Exhibits Committee at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture and in January 2007 became the Chairperson of the Board of the Lewis Museum. She also sits on the Board of the Creative Alliance for the Artists, Baltimore, MD. Between 1985 and 1998, King-Hammond became the project director for Ford/Phillip Morris Fellowships for Artists of Color at MICA (including Yale School of Art, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Cranbrook Academy of Art, and California Institute of the Arts). She sits on juries, boards, organizations, and art commissions including Executive Board, International Association of Art Critics (2000-2003); President, College Art Association (1996-2000); Board of Overseers, Baltimore School for the Arts (1996-1999); Vice-President, Jacob Lawrence Catalog Riasonne Project; Trustee, Baltimore Museum of Art (1981-1987); Center For Emerging Artists (2005-2007); Advisory Board, Edna Manley School for the Visual Arts, Kingston, Jamaica (1988-Present). King-Hammond has won Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Studio Museum in Harlem (2002), Lifetime Service, Maryland Institute College of Art (2005), The DuBois Circle (2006). In 2008 received Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Women’s Art Caucus-College Art Association and the James A. Porter Colloquium, Howard University and an Andy Warhol Curatorial Fellowship. Staff Curatorial Lead Jean Blackwell Font is Senior Arts Manager and PACE Programs Lead in the Department of Philanthropy, Arts, Culture, and Education, at The Betsy Hotel, where she has served for more than five years in wide ranging roles. As staff-lead for all things ‘visual arts-related’, and the go-to person for just about everything else PACE-related, Jean combines knowledge gleaned from personal artistic practice and a deep commitment to service, that has enabled The Betsy’s exhibitions (and PACE) programs to thrive. Jean has assisted Dr. Hammond with installation, signage, graphic design, digital communications development and public outreach - in their shared roles at The Betsy, since 2010. Staff Graphics Assistant Jose Vega is a third year student in graphic design at Florida International University, who assisted on exhibition signage and catalogue design for Art Basel 2015. The Betsy’s PACE Team Deborah Plutzik Briggs is Vice President for PACE (philanthropy, arts, culture, and education) and Community at The Betsy, and has served in this roll since 2009, working with Jonathan Plutzik to brand Betsy as one of the world’s leading art hotels (USA Today, NY TIMES, NY1, Wall Street Journal). In this role she’s led Betsy in receiving two coveted Knight Foundation Challenge Grants for innovation in creating a vibrant business that builds community through the arts. Deborah holds a Doctorate in Music and Arts in Education from Columbia University and has a 30-year career in community arts. Pablo Cartaya, Literary Programs and Community Partnerships Manager, joined the Betsy team with initial funding from The Knight Foundation. With an MFA in Writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts, Pablo has two books coming out in the next 18 months, with several others slated for 2018 and beyond, and assists on developing and hosting Betsy PACE programs.
The Betsy   s Visual Arts Team        Art Basel 2015 Senior Curator Dr. Leslie King-Hammond served as Dean of Graduate Stu...
The Betsy’s Visual Arts Team Art Basel 2015 Senior Curator Dr. Leslie King-Hammond served as Dean of Graduate Studies at Maryland Institute College of Art for over 30 years, retiring as Dean Emeritus, just last year. Dr. Hammond is currently a Senior Fellow at the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation in Baltimore and has been the Visual Arts Ambassador for The Betsy-South Beach since 2009. In the spring of 2006 King-Hammond was appointed Chairperson of the Collections and Exhibits Committee at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture and in January 2007 became the Chairperson of the Board of the Lewis Museum. She also sits on the Board of the Creative Alliance for the Artists, Baltimore, MD. Between 1985 and 1998, King-Hammond became the project director for Ford/Phillip Morris Fellowships for Artists of Color at MICA (including Yale School of Art, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Cranbrook Academy of Art, and California Institute of the Arts). She sits on juries, boards, organizations, and art commissions including Executive Board, International Association of Art Critics (2000-2003); President, College Art Association (1996-2000); Board of Overseers, Baltimore School for the Arts (1996-1999); Vice-President, Jacob Lawrence Catalog Riasonne Project; Trustee, Baltimore Museum of Art (1981-1987); Center For Emerging Artists (2005-2007); Advisory Board, Edna Manley School for the Visual Arts, Kingston, Jamaica (1988-Present). King-Hammond has won Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Studio Museum in Harlem (2002), Lifetime Service, Maryland Institute College of Art (2005), The DuBois Circle (2006). In 2008 received Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Women’s Art Caucus-College Art Association and the James A. Porter Colloquium, Howard University and an Andy Warhol Curatorial Fellowship. Staff Curatorial Lead Jean Blackwell Font is Senior Arts Manager and PACE Programs Lead in the Department of Philanthropy, Arts, Culture, and Education, at The Betsy Hotel, where she has served for more than five years in wide ranging roles. As staff-lead for all things ‘visual arts-related’, and the go-to person for just about everything else PACE-related, Jean combines knowledge gleaned from personal artistic practice and a deep commitment to service, that has enabled The Betsy’s exhibitions (and PACE) programs to thrive. Jean has assisted Dr. Hammond with installation, signage, graphic design, digital communications development and public outreach - in their shared roles at The Betsy, since 2010. Staff Graphics Assistant Jose Vega is a third year student in graphic design at Florida International University, who assisted on exhibition signage and catalogue design for Art Basel 2015. The Betsy’s PACE Team Deborah Plutzik Briggs is Vice President for PACE (philanthropy, arts, culture, and education) and Community at The Betsy, and has served in this roll since 2009, working with Jonathan Plutzik to brand Betsy as one of the world’s leading art hotels (USA Today, NY TIMES, NY1, Wall Street Journal). In this role she’s led Betsy in receiving two coveted Knight Foundation Challenge Grants for innovation in creating a vibrant business that builds community through the arts. Deborah holds a Doctorate in Music and Arts in Education from Columbia University and has a 30-year career in community arts. Pablo Cartaya, Literary Programs and Community Partnerships Manager, joined the Betsy team with initial funding from The Knight Foundation. With an MFA in Writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts, Pablo has two books coming out in the next 18 months, with several others slated for 2018 and beyond, and assists on developing and hosting Betsy PACE programs.
The Betsy   s Visual Arts Team        Art Basel 2015 Senior Curator Dr. Leslie King-Hammond served as Dean of Graduate Stu...
Community Matters. www.TheBetsyHotel.com Presented as part of The Betsy - South Beach Philanthropy, Arts, Culture, and Education Program The Betsy has twice received a Knight Arts Challenge Grant (2012, 2015) to support the literary arts programming for The Betsy Writer’s Room (thebetsywritersroom.com) and named the 2013 Condé Nast Johansens Most Excellent Small Hotel in North America. Original art adorns walls and stairways, Guest Rooms and Suites boast individual literature collections, and our Writer’s Room hosts visiting artists. Concerts and poetry readings abound, offering a gentle embrace to world culture. The Betsy has partnered with over 250 community organizations since its floor to ceiling restoration in 2009, and hosted 300 Artists in Residence since 2012. The Betsy’s unique hybrid of great design, superlative food, contemplative art, Sunday salons and Sferra linens on incredible beds has all become The (award-winning) Betsy-South Beach, where a line from poet Hyam Plutzik serves as the perfect tag line for all that we do: “Expect no more. This is happiness.” A portion of sales benefits Zara’s Center for AIDS-Impacted Children and The Betsy Community Fund. For assistance, please see the Concierge or contact Jean Blackwell Font, The Betsy Staff Curatorial Lead at 305-760-6902. Shipping cost additional: $60 for domestic US shipments / $200 for international shipments Larger framed works may incur additional shipping fees. Expect no more. This is happiness.TM 1440 Ocean Drive, Miami Beach, FL 33139 305-531-6100 | www.thebetsyhotel.com
Community  Matters. www.TheBetsyHotel.com  Presented as part of The Betsy - South Beach Philanthropy, Arts, Culture, and E...

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