In human social affairs, discrimination is treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction in favor of or against, a person or thing based on the group, class, or category to which the person or thing is perceived to belong rather than on individual merit.

Name: Jessica Sailema Criollo 
Level: 11th (2 BGU "B")

Antidiscrimination campaign

In human social affairsdiscrimination is treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction in favor of or against, a person or thing based on the group, class, or category to which the person or thing is perceived to belong rather than on individual merit. This includes treatment of an individual or group, based on their actual or perceived membership in a certain group or social category, "in a way that is worse than the way people are usually treated". It involves the group'sIn human social affairsdiscrimination is treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction in favor of or against, a person or thing based on the group, class, or category to which the person or thing is perceived to belong rather than on individual merit. This includes treatment of an individual or group, based on their actual or perceived membership in a certain group or social category, "in a way that is worse than the way people are usually treated". 

 

Type of discrimination.

Is when there is a requirement or rule that is the same for everyone but in effect disadvantages people from a particular group more than people from other groups - unless the requirement is reasonable in the circumstances. 

For example:

  • an employer says that they need a person over 180cm tall to do a certain job, which could indirectly discriminate against women and some ethnic groups (sex or race discrimination);
  • a qualifying body excludes everyone with diabetes from registration on safety grounds, which could indirectly discriminate against individuals whose diabetes is controlled and would not impede them from doing the job safely (disability discrimination).

Some examples of discrimination include the following:

a)    Harassment – inappropriate jokes, insults, name-calling or displays such as a poster or cartoons directed at a person because of their race, colour, sex or gender, sexual orientation, etc.

b)   Wage discrimination – An example would be when an employer offers a lower wage for a woman doing similar work as a man or offers a lower wage to new immigrant having similar experience/skills as a non-immigrant.

c)    Discrimination in hiring – During a job interview, being asked inappropriate questions about child care arrangements if you are a parent or whether or not you plan to have children; questions about your disabilities or health limitations or problems; your age, your religion or any other personal characteristic protected under human rights; and not getting the job based solely on your answer to these questions and not your qualifications or experience.

d)    Being fired when you are pregnant (sex discrimination) or are injured and need time off to heal (discrimination based on disability and the duty to accommodate).  See description of “reasonable accommodation” under the section ‘WHAT KINDS OF DISCRIMINATION CAN OCCUR?”.

e)    Discrimination in housing – When seeking an apartment for rent, the landlord tells you that “no children are allowed” (discrimination based on family status) or they won’t rent to people under 25 years (age discrimination) because “they’re too noisy and won’t look after the place”.