Nunavik’s geological context is conducive to the presence of mineral resources and, since the 1950s, the region has been witness to active mineral exploration and mining activity. In 2014, there are two active mines in Nunavik, several mining projects at advanced stages of development, and approximately 40,000 mining claims. As mineral exploration and mining activity is expected to increase in the coming years, Nunavik Inuit are concerned about the effects of mining development on their way of life and on the wildlife and lands where they have practised subsistence harvesting for millennia. Wildlife and lands that are essential and important for subsistence harvesting must be protected, along with archaeological and traditional burial sites. Mineral exploration and mining activity also represents a significant force for generating jobs, training, business and investment opportunities for Nunavik Inuit. Further to consultations carried out with all Nunavik Inuit communities and regional organizations, the Makivik Corporation has developed this mining policy to state the conditions under which it will support mining development in Nunavik. This mining policy applies to the territory north of the 55th parallel in Québec covered by the James Bay and Northern Québec Agreement.