FIRST QUARTER 2016 Driven to Serve
FIRST QUARTER 2016  Driven to Serve
11 First Quarter 2016 13 Table of Contents Human Resources Recognition 15 3........................ Anniversaries 5........................ Driver Scorecard Bonuses 6........................ Star Award 7........................ Mileage Bonuses 9........................ Hero Spotlight 15...................... Calling Out the Silent Killer? Driver Services 17...................... Did You Know? 19...................... A Dirty Little Secret Safety 11...................... Sharing the Road Maintenance 13...................... Feeling the Pressure? 17 Our company magazine is the voice of our organization - the best place to learn what is going on within the company. It is created to educate, inform and, at times, entertain. It will be an ever evolving piece of communication as we evaluate what content makes for the best read. Who wants to be bored while reading good news? No thank you! We want you to anxiously await our quarterly issues - you are the customer, our Quest Global family. This Magazine is for you! Vice President/ Editor in Chief EDITOR Chris Champion | CREATIVE Erin Williams & Brooks Moore PHOTOGRAPHY Chris Champion | CONTRIBUTORS Betty Scott, Dennis and Sherrill Stock, Gene Jenkins 2
11  First Quarter 2016  13  Table of Contents Human Resources  Recognition  15  3........................ Anniversaries 5....
11 First Quarter 2016 13 Table of Contents Human Resources Recognition 15 3........................ Anniversaries 5........................ Driver Scorecard Bonuses 6........................ Star Award 7........................ Mileage Bonuses 9........................ Hero Spotlight 15...................... Calling Out the Silent Killer? Driver Services 17...................... Did You Know? 19...................... A Dirty Little Secret Safety 11...................... Sharing the Road Maintenance 13...................... Feeling the Pressure? 17 Our company magazine is the voice of our organization - the best place to learn what is going on within the company. It is created to educate, inform and, at times, entertain. It will be an ever evolving piece of communication as we evaluate what content makes for the best read. Who wants to be bored while reading good news? No thank you! We want you to anxiously await our quarterly issues - you are the customer, our Quest Global family. This Magazine is for you! Vice President/ Editor in Chief EDITOR Chris Champion | CREATIVE Erin Williams & Brooks Moore PHOTOGRAPHY Chris Champion | CONTRIBUTORS Betty Scott, Dennis and Sherrill Stock, Gene Jenkins 2
11  First Quarter 2016  13  Table of Contents Human Resources  Recognition  15  3........................ Anniversaries 5....
Anniversaries 1st Quarter 2016 I Again, thank you for your continued support. Recognition 2 3 YEARS Danny Chambers Kristi Chambers Charles Delisi Thomas Mitchell James Clayton Phillip Hunter Chirea Thornton Eric Thornton Clarence Coleman Robert Stephens Kenneth Sullivan Elizabeth Sanders Gary Tate George White Marcus Elzey Angela Martin Ida Azulay Richard Duncan Carol Udas Christina Olson Mindy Olson Scott Udas Carissa Serviss Jamie Stewart Kevin Kronsagen Jamison Hardin Judy Husfeld Marvin Husfeld Richard Pruett Leslie Wiggins Curtis Looney Jovonn Horrice Chris Patterson Tracy Wilson Edward Young Brandon Stokes Danny Jacobs Tanya Jacobs Ryan Walton Sharon Walton Christopher Leath Emilee McMaster William McMaster Michael Stover John Brown Linda Farley Patrick Farley Loretta Chilcote Babette Kramp Charol Loper Stephanie Floyd Mark Greer Thomas Kilbride Theresa Oliver Hazel Floyd Amy Wesley Franklin Wesley Rita Jackson Jennifer Williams YEARS Gessie Goldstein Peter Goldstein Jacquelyn Henthorn Hope Laire Brian Craig Sabrina Brown Debra Elger David Elger Kimberly Callihan Gary Anthony Ashley Young Angie Amos YEARS 11 - Jeff Turner 5-9 YEARS Stella Spedden Thomas Rodgers would like to thank each of you for your hard work and dedication to Quest Global during your time as part of our family. The accomplishments we have achieved together – all the improvements we have made – could not have been attained without your support and effort. The difference you make is nothing short of legendary. Congratulations on your successes and for setting solid foundations for the years to come. 10+ 4 10 - Travis White 10 - Weston Blalock YEARS 9 - Rebecca Scott 9 - Robert Scott 9 - Juan Zuniga-Ruiz 9 - Debbie Goodrich 8 - Allan Gage 8 - Mary Guenther 7 - Robin Stevenson 7 - William Stevenson 6 - Kimberly Martin 6 - Harold Scott 6 - Johnny Boring 6 - Michal Calbert 6 - Gordon Wilson 6 - Adam Reutter 5 - Eric Bennett 5 - Charles Swindall 5 - Norma Avery 5 - Jack Winkelman 5 - Edmund Chilcote 5 - Bradley Daniels 5 - Janie Mason 5 - Wesley Akers 5 - Johanna Denton 5 - Richard Denton 1 YEAR Justin Gladden Codey Jones Jessica Katzenberger James Whiddon Paula Whiddon Kristoffer Gregorich Rebecca Gregorich Alfredo Lopez Tony West Trent West Linda Ring Billy Roberson Catherine Breiling Joseph Breiling Brenda Looney THE DIFFERENCE YOU MAKE IS NOTHING SHORT OF LEGENDARY Q1 ‘16 4
Anniversaries 1st Quarter 2016  I  Again, thank you for your continued support.  Recognition  2  3  YEARS  Danny Chambers ...
Anniversaries 1st Quarter 2016 I Again, thank you for your continued support. Recognition 2 3 YEARS Danny Chambers Kristi Chambers Charles Delisi Thomas Mitchell James Clayton Phillip Hunter Chirea Thornton Eric Thornton Clarence Coleman Robert Stephens Kenneth Sullivan Elizabeth Sanders Gary Tate George White Marcus Elzey Angela Martin Ida Azulay Richard Duncan Carol Udas Christina Olson Mindy Olson Scott Udas Carissa Serviss Jamie Stewart Kevin Kronsagen Jamison Hardin Judy Husfeld Marvin Husfeld Richard Pruett Leslie Wiggins Curtis Looney Jovonn Horrice Chris Patterson Tracy Wilson Edward Young Brandon Stokes Danny Jacobs Tanya Jacobs Ryan Walton Sharon Walton Christopher Leath Emilee McMaster William McMaster Michael Stover John Brown Linda Farley Patrick Farley Loretta Chilcote Babette Kramp Charol Loper Stephanie Floyd Mark Greer Thomas Kilbride Theresa Oliver Hazel Floyd Amy Wesley Franklin Wesley Rita Jackson Jennifer Williams YEARS Gessie Goldstein Peter Goldstein Jacquelyn Henthorn Hope Laire Brian Craig Sabrina Brown Debra Elger David Elger Kimberly Callihan Gary Anthony Ashley Young Angie Amos YEARS 11 - Jeff Turner 5-9 YEARS Stella Spedden Thomas Rodgers would like to thank each of you for your hard work and dedication to Quest Global during your time as part of our family. The accomplishments we have achieved together – all the improvements we have made – could not have been attained without your support and effort. The difference you make is nothing short of legendary. Congratulations on your successes and for setting solid foundations for the years to come. 10+ 4 10 - Travis White 10 - Weston Blalock YEARS 9 - Rebecca Scott 9 - Robert Scott 9 - Juan Zuniga-Ruiz 9 - Debbie Goodrich 8 - Allan Gage 8 - Mary Guenther 7 - Robin Stevenson 7 - William Stevenson 6 - Kimberly Martin 6 - Harold Scott 6 - Johnny Boring 6 - Michal Calbert 6 - Gordon Wilson 6 - Adam Reutter 5 - Eric Bennett 5 - Charles Swindall 5 - Norma Avery 5 - Jack Winkelman 5 - Edmund Chilcote 5 - Bradley Daniels 5 - Janie Mason 5 - Wesley Akers 5 - Johanna Denton 5 - Richard Denton 1 YEAR Justin Gladden Codey Jones Jessica Katzenberger James Whiddon Paula Whiddon Kristoffer Gregorich Rebecca Gregorich Alfredo Lopez Tony West Trent West Linda Ring Billy Roberson Catherine Breiling Joseph Breiling Brenda Looney THE DIFFERENCE YOU MAKE IS NOTHING SHORT OF LEGENDARY Q1 ‘16 4
Anniversaries 1st Quarter 2016  I  Again, thank you for your continued support.  Recognition  2  3  YEARS  Danny Chambers ...
Q1 ‘16 Driver Scorecard Bonus Recipients 1st Quarter 2016 Our Quarterly Driver Scorecard Bonus is a recent addition to our pay package having started during the first quarter of this year. The Scorecard rewards outstanding achievements in the areas of safety, efficiency and productivity. Individuals who earn the Quarterly Driver Scorecard Bonus receive an additional $500.00 per quarter. Search This additional bonus often means individuals earn an additional $1,000$2,000 per year on top of regular wages and other bonuses. Congratulations to everyone listed! We appreciate your hard work and thank you for your continued commitment to excellence. Recognition "Individuals who earn the Quarterly Driver Scorecard Bonus receive an additional $500.00 per quarter." Natelie Jassopadilla Christopher R. Vivelo Cynthia S. Roberts Lawrence D. Walker Troy D. Johnston Jr Chris Patterson Randall D. Durden Alfredo Lopez Rachel Young Darlene E. Strickland Oscar Jassopadilla Chirea L. Thornton Milinda P. Durden Carol L. Jones Lennon L. Hawes Jr James S. Strickland Micheal E. Brown Trent L. West Jerrold Higginbotham Jovonn L. Horrice Gary N. Baugh Paula R. Whiddon Deja Vu Roe Mark H. Zywiczka Veronica A. Beginez Eric B. Thornton Philip J. Brown Janet L. Young Chad D. Trutna Susan L. Lewis Darryl S. Moore James J. Stilen Christopher J. Gussenhoven Tiffany N. Thomas Tony L. West Jennifer S. Holcomb James E. Green Jr Rebecca M. Scott Amber L. Williams Melissa L. Gilbert Larry White Jr Arlene D. Johnson Michelle D. Austin Thomas F. Mitchell William N. Stevenson Heather D. Opatich Debra S. Ballard Sharola M. Lambert Emilee R. McMaster We’re on the lookout for a Star! Do you know someone who deserves some recognition for their accomplishments, going above and beyond your expectations or because they helped out someone in need? If you know these amazing folks, let us know! Send in a Macro 21 to detail what they did or do to earn this recognition. We will recognize one person or team during each edition of The Compass to call attention for their outstanding efforts. 6
Q1    16  Driver Scorecard Bonus Recipients 1st Quarter 2016 Our Quarterly Driver Scorecard Bonus is a recent addition to ...
Q1 ‘16 Driver Scorecard Bonus Recipients 1st Quarter 2016 Our Quarterly Driver Scorecard Bonus is a recent addition to our pay package having started during the first quarter of this year. The Scorecard rewards outstanding achievements in the areas of safety, efficiency and productivity. Individuals who earn the Quarterly Driver Scorecard Bonus receive an additional $500.00 per quarter. Search This additional bonus often means individuals earn an additional $1,000$2,000 per year on top of regular wages and other bonuses. Congratulations to everyone listed! We appreciate your hard work and thank you for your continued commitment to excellence. Recognition "Individuals who earn the Quarterly Driver Scorecard Bonus receive an additional $500.00 per quarter." Natelie Jassopadilla Christopher R. Vivelo Cynthia S. Roberts Lawrence D. Walker Troy D. Johnston Jr Chris Patterson Randall D. Durden Alfredo Lopez Rachel Young Darlene E. Strickland Oscar Jassopadilla Chirea L. Thornton Milinda P. Durden Carol L. Jones Lennon L. Hawes Jr James S. Strickland Micheal E. Brown Trent L. West Jerrold Higginbotham Jovonn L. Horrice Gary N. Baugh Paula R. Whiddon Deja Vu Roe Mark H. Zywiczka Veronica A. Beginez Eric B. Thornton Philip J. Brown Janet L. Young Chad D. Trutna Susan L. Lewis Darryl S. Moore James J. Stilen Christopher J. Gussenhoven Tiffany N. Thomas Tony L. West Jennifer S. Holcomb James E. Green Jr Rebecca M. Scott Amber L. Williams Melissa L. Gilbert Larry White Jr Arlene D. Johnson Michelle D. Austin Thomas F. Mitchell William N. Stevenson Heather D. Opatich Debra S. Ballard Sharola M. Lambert Emilee R. McMaster We’re on the lookout for a Star! Do you know someone who deserves some recognition for their accomplishments, going above and beyond your expectations or because they helped out someone in need? If you know these amazing folks, let us know! Send in a Macro 21 to detail what they did or do to earn this recognition. We will recognize one person or team during each edition of The Compass to call attention for their outstanding efforts. 6
Q1    16  Driver Scorecard Bonus Recipients 1st Quarter 2016 Our Quarterly Driver Scorecard Bonus is a recent addition to ...
Q1 ‘16 Mileage Bonus Recipients 1st Quarter 2016 Our Monthly Mileage Bonus is a tradition and rewards excellence in the area of productivity. Teams who earn the Monthly Mileage Bonus receive an additional $0.04 per mile split between the team members on all the miles they ran during the month. This additional bonus often means teams earn an additional $6,000-$9,000 per year on top of regular wages and other bonuses. Congratulations to all the teams listed! We appreciate your hard work and thank you for your continued dedication. "This additional bonus often means teams earn an additional $6,000-$9,000 per year on top of regular wages and other bonuses." Recognition January Mileage Bonus Recipients February Mileage Bonus Recipients Ida Azulay Stephanie Floyd Roy Payton Patrick White Rebecca Beardsley Jeffery Foster Creston Percival James Williams Marcus Blue Pamela Garrett Wayne Perry Colin Young Adrienne Bonne Carol Gordon Robert Rose Mark Zywiczka Valerie Hamilton-Bonne Cindy Grigsby Tamie Sherman Nancy Zywiczka Gregory Brownfield Lonnie Grigsby Enoch Shippy Shane Brownfield Pamela Harmon Rosemarie Shippy Kimberly Carter Lennon Hawes Amy Smith Joshua Clark Jeffrey Henry David Smith Andrew Clemons Sherylyn Hill Hazel Floyd Lisa Crosby Brian Kochie Robert Stephens Eddie Darnell Sharola Lambert Robin Stevenson Trisha Darnell Asia Lewis William Stevenson Brandon Dooley Michael Michetti Kenneth Sullivan Richard Duncan Sandra Michetti Dawit Tesfu Daryl Durant Todd Moudy Terrance Tieuel Ralph Everhart Heather Opatich Kenassa Wedajo March Mileage Bonus Recipients Fred Angell Kelley Harvey Todd Moudy Christopher Vivelo Jeffrey Armstrong Giuseppina Goldstein Thomas Kilbride Rosemarie Shippy Jeffrey Armstrong Richard Harvey Clinton Murphy Robert Waggoner Gary Baugh Peter Goldstein Gale Benedict Matthew Shirley Norma Avery Latriece Hayes Courtney Murphy Jack Winkelman Veronica Beginez Carol Gordon Brian Kochie Mark Skerritt Tyrone Baldwin Jennifer Holcomb Mark Nichols Brian Young Kevin Benedict Matthew Gordon Babette Kramp Penny Skerritt Debra Ballard Eric Howard Terry Nichols Carl Young Eric Bennett Kristoffer Gregorich Scott Lindsay Earl Smith Ricky Ballard Jason Hoy Charles Noel Vicky Young Nia Bergman Rebecca Gregorich Cheryl Long George Smith Marcus Blue Tammy Hoy Teresa Noel Marcus Blue Clifton Henry Thomas Long Randall Snook Debra Brown Thomas Huckeba Theresa Oliver Gregory Brownfield Thomas Herbert Alfredo Lopez Robin Stevenson Gregory Brownfield Phillip Hunter Janet Young Shane Brownfield Sherylyn Hill Billy Lumley William Stevenson Michael Brown Christine Hysler Deja Vu Roe Jessica Bundenthal Carol Udas Teresa Lumley Dawit Tesfu Shane Brownfield Natelie Jassopadilla Anthony Ross Elizabeth Burch Jason Hoy Melissa Lyle Chirea Thornton Dominic Cardoza Oscar Jassopadilla Charles Runyon Tommy Burgess Tammy Hoy Nicholas Lyle Eric Thornton Betty Chandler Tami Johnston John Runyon Dominic Cardoza Thomas Huckeba Jeramiah Maddox Catherine Trott Robert Chandler Troy Johnston Tammy Runyon Christine Cauthan Michael Hughes Sharon Maddox Lawrence Trudell Carmen Crespo Thomas Kilbride Marquis Sapp Velix Charles Rebecca Kent-Hughes Mike McElhaney Scott Udas Delgado Brian Kochie Rebecca Scott Carmen Crespo Delgado Judy Husfeld Peggy McElhaney Christopher Vivelo Donald Dease Alfredo Lopez Robert Scott Cynthia Crossman Marvin Husfeld Joe McGill Robert Waggoner Dawn Dickson Jeramiah Maddox Enoch Shippy Steven Crossman Jeffrey Ives Todd Moudy Tony Ward Shaquita Dorsey Sharon Maddox Rosemarie Shippy Eddie Darnell Teresa Wilson-Ives Tara Myricks Kenassa Wedajo David Dreyer Adalberto Martinez- Mark Skerritt Trisha Darnell Anthony Jach Charles Noel Amy Wesley Kristen Dreyer Irizarry Penny Skerritt Dawn Dickson Robert Jackson Teresa Noel Franklin Wesley Milinda Durden Mike McElhaney Junetta Cole-Stebbins Ralph Everhart Raheeam James Mark Oster Tony West Randall Durden Peggy McElhaney Lloyd Stebbins Leslie Foster Natelie Jassopadilla Teri Payne Trent West Elvie Gallant Jason Meyer Darlene Strickland Robert Foster Oscar Jassopadilla Roy Payton James Whiddon Froylan Gallegos Michael Michetti James Strickland Barbara Friedel Latanya Jenkins Robert Rose Paula Whiddon Carol Gordon Sandra Michetti Chirea Thornton Robert Friedel Tami Johnston Charles Runyon Cheryl Williams Matthew Gordon Frank Miley Eric Thornton Stephen Fulcher Terrell Johnson Tammy Runyon Jeremy Williams Mark Greer Darryl Moore Darius Turner Froylan Gallegos Troy Johnston Enoch Shippy Paula Williams 8
Q1    16  Mileage Bonus Recipients 1st Quarter 2016 Our Monthly Mileage Bonus is a tradition and rewards excellence in the...
Q1 ‘16 Mileage Bonus Recipients 1st Quarter 2016 Our Monthly Mileage Bonus is a tradition and rewards excellence in the area of productivity. Teams who earn the Monthly Mileage Bonus receive an additional $0.04 per mile split between the team members on all the miles they ran during the month. This additional bonus often means teams earn an additional $6,000-$9,000 per year on top of regular wages and other bonuses. Congratulations to all the teams listed! We appreciate your hard work and thank you for your continued dedication. "This additional bonus often means teams earn an additional $6,000-$9,000 per year on top of regular wages and other bonuses." Recognition January Mileage Bonus Recipients February Mileage Bonus Recipients Ida Azulay Stephanie Floyd Roy Payton Patrick White Rebecca Beardsley Jeffery Foster Creston Percival James Williams Marcus Blue Pamela Garrett Wayne Perry Colin Young Adrienne Bonne Carol Gordon Robert Rose Mark Zywiczka Valerie Hamilton-Bonne Cindy Grigsby Tamie Sherman Nancy Zywiczka Gregory Brownfield Lonnie Grigsby Enoch Shippy Shane Brownfield Pamela Harmon Rosemarie Shippy Kimberly Carter Lennon Hawes Amy Smith Joshua Clark Jeffrey Henry David Smith Andrew Clemons Sherylyn Hill Hazel Floyd Lisa Crosby Brian Kochie Robert Stephens Eddie Darnell Sharola Lambert Robin Stevenson Trisha Darnell Asia Lewis William Stevenson Brandon Dooley Michael Michetti Kenneth Sullivan Richard Duncan Sandra Michetti Dawit Tesfu Daryl Durant Todd Moudy Terrance Tieuel Ralph Everhart Heather Opatich Kenassa Wedajo March Mileage Bonus Recipients Fred Angell Kelley Harvey Todd Moudy Christopher Vivelo Jeffrey Armstrong Giuseppina Goldstein Thomas Kilbride Rosemarie Shippy Jeffrey Armstrong Richard Harvey Clinton Murphy Robert Waggoner Gary Baugh Peter Goldstein Gale Benedict Matthew Shirley Norma Avery Latriece Hayes Courtney Murphy Jack Winkelman Veronica Beginez Carol Gordon Brian Kochie Mark Skerritt Tyrone Baldwin Jennifer Holcomb Mark Nichols Brian Young Kevin Benedict Matthew Gordon Babette Kramp Penny Skerritt Debra Ballard Eric Howard Terry Nichols Carl Young Eric Bennett Kristoffer Gregorich Scott Lindsay Earl Smith Ricky Ballard Jason Hoy Charles Noel Vicky Young Nia Bergman Rebecca Gregorich Cheryl Long George Smith Marcus Blue Tammy Hoy Teresa Noel Marcus Blue Clifton Henry Thomas Long Randall Snook Debra Brown Thomas Huckeba Theresa Oliver Gregory Brownfield Thomas Herbert Alfredo Lopez Robin Stevenson Gregory Brownfield Phillip Hunter Janet Young Shane Brownfield Sherylyn Hill Billy Lumley William Stevenson Michael Brown Christine Hysler Deja Vu Roe Jessica Bundenthal Carol Udas Teresa Lumley Dawit Tesfu Shane Brownfield Natelie Jassopadilla Anthony Ross Elizabeth Burch Jason Hoy Melissa Lyle Chirea Thornton Dominic Cardoza Oscar Jassopadilla Charles Runyon Tommy Burgess Tammy Hoy Nicholas Lyle Eric Thornton Betty Chandler Tami Johnston John Runyon Dominic Cardoza Thomas Huckeba Jeramiah Maddox Catherine Trott Robert Chandler Troy Johnston Tammy Runyon Christine Cauthan Michael Hughes Sharon Maddox Lawrence Trudell Carmen Crespo Thomas Kilbride Marquis Sapp Velix Charles Rebecca Kent-Hughes Mike McElhaney Scott Udas Delgado Brian Kochie Rebecca Scott Carmen Crespo Delgado Judy Husfeld Peggy McElhaney Christopher Vivelo Donald Dease Alfredo Lopez Robert Scott Cynthia Crossman Marvin Husfeld Joe McGill Robert Waggoner Dawn Dickson Jeramiah Maddox Enoch Shippy Steven Crossman Jeffrey Ives Todd Moudy Tony Ward Shaquita Dorsey Sharon Maddox Rosemarie Shippy Eddie Darnell Teresa Wilson-Ives Tara Myricks Kenassa Wedajo David Dreyer Adalberto Martinez- Mark Skerritt Trisha Darnell Anthony Jach Charles Noel Amy Wesley Kristen Dreyer Irizarry Penny Skerritt Dawn Dickson Robert Jackson Teresa Noel Franklin Wesley Milinda Durden Mike McElhaney Junetta Cole-Stebbins Ralph Everhart Raheeam James Mark Oster Tony West Randall Durden Peggy McElhaney Lloyd Stebbins Leslie Foster Natelie Jassopadilla Teri Payne Trent West Elvie Gallant Jason Meyer Darlene Strickland Robert Foster Oscar Jassopadilla Roy Payton James Whiddon Froylan Gallegos Michael Michetti James Strickland Barbara Friedel Latanya Jenkins Robert Rose Paula Whiddon Carol Gordon Sandra Michetti Chirea Thornton Robert Friedel Tami Johnston Charles Runyon Cheryl Williams Matthew Gordon Frank Miley Eric Thornton Stephen Fulcher Terrell Johnson Tammy Runyon Jeremy Williams Mark Greer Darryl Moore Darius Turner Froylan Gallegos Troy Johnston Enoch Shippy Paula Williams 8
Q1    16  Mileage Bonus Recipients 1st Quarter 2016 Our Monthly Mileage Bonus is a tradition and rewards excellence in the...
Q1 ‘16 Quest Global Salutes Dennis Stock Dennis has been in our family since 2013 and is currently an OTR Team Driver with his wife Sherrill. We are highlighting him in this edition of The Compass in an ongoing effort to recognize the heroes in our family and bring awareness to their sacrifices and those of their families. Dennis’ military career started in the U.S. Navy in 1970 using the cache program at age 17, training at the Naval Training Center in Orlando, FL. He continued training as a machinist mate at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center in North Chicago, IL and attended further nuclear propulsion training at Bainbridge, MD and Saratoga Springs, NY. Dennis later served on the U.S.S. Forrestal CVA 59 taking her from dry dock to battle ready. His last duty was aboard the U.S.S. Casimir Pulaski SSBN 633(gold) – a fleet of ballistic missile submarines where he qualified submarines and spent three years providing deterrent services patrolling the icy waters near the Arctic Circle as a reminder to our Cold War adversaries, helping to prevent M.A.D. Dennis’ last date of service was in 1976. Recognition We are very proud to have Dennis with us and hope to have him in the family for years to come. We all thank you for your service to our Country! DON'T GET BURNED. GET ENDORSED. Teams with their HAZMAT Endorsement earn between $10,000 and $15,000 more per year, on average, than teams without their HAZMAT Endorsement. Don't let that money burn away. 10
Q1    16  Quest Global  Salutes Dennis Stock Dennis has been in our family since 2013 and is currently an OTR Team Driver ...
Q1 ‘16 Quest Global Salutes Dennis Stock Dennis has been in our family since 2013 and is currently an OTR Team Driver with his wife Sherrill. We are highlighting him in this edition of The Compass in an ongoing effort to recognize the heroes in our family and bring awareness to their sacrifices and those of their families. Dennis’ military career started in the U.S. Navy in 1970 using the cache program at age 17, training at the Naval Training Center in Orlando, FL. He continued training as a machinist mate at the Great Lakes Naval Training Center in North Chicago, IL and attended further nuclear propulsion training at Bainbridge, MD and Saratoga Springs, NY. Dennis later served on the U.S.S. Forrestal CVA 59 taking her from dry dock to battle ready. His last duty was aboard the U.S.S. Casimir Pulaski SSBN 633(gold) – a fleet of ballistic missile submarines where he qualified submarines and spent three years providing deterrent services patrolling the icy waters near the Arctic Circle as a reminder to our Cold War adversaries, helping to prevent M.A.D. Dennis’ last date of service was in 1976. Recognition We are very proud to have Dennis with us and hope to have him in the family for years to come. We all thank you for your service to our Country! DON'T GET BURNED. GET ENDORSED. Teams with their HAZMAT Endorsement earn between $10,000 and $15,000 more per year, on average, than teams without their HAZMAT Endorsement. Don't let that money burn away. 10
Q1    16  Quest Global  Salutes Dennis Stock Dennis has been in our family since 2013 and is currently an OTR Team Driver ...
Q1 ‘16 Sharing the Road With warmer weather right around the bend, increasing numbers of motorcycles will begin to take to the roadways of America. Many people enjoy traveling by motorcycle, and rightly so. • As you move in to the traffic lane ahead of a motorcycle, drivers should use good space management, checking their mirrors regularly to verify the location of the motorcycles and other vehicles. They are fuel-efficient, occupy little space and can be fun to ride. However, motorcyclists are more vulnerable to injury than drivers of most other motor vehicles if they become involved in a collision. • When driving behind a motorcycle, drivers should increase their following distance to provide enough space for the motorcyclists to maneuver or stop in an emergency. • If being overtaken by a motorcycle, drivers should maintain lane position and speed. Motorcyclists should be allowed to complete the pass and assume proper lane position as quickly as possible. They deserve the same courtesies given to other motorists. Watch for the unexpected and give motorcyclists their share of the road. • Motorcycles are more difficult to see than other types of vehicles on the road. For this reason, it is important to exercise caution when motorcycles are present on the roadway. • Collisions between motorcycles and other vehicles are most likely to occur at intersections. Motorcycles cast a narrow silhouette and are usually shorter in length than most motor vehicles. When approaching intersections, they can appear farther away than they actually are because of their limited profile. In addition, it can be difficult to judge how fast motorcycles are traveling. Drivers need to make sure they keep the motorcycle in their line of vision and know its speed before turning at or entering an intersection. • Misinterpreting a motorcyclist’s intentions can be dangerous. Be aware that skilled motorcyclists change positions in the traffic lane to allow other drivers to see them better. Motorcyclists often change position in their lane to prepare for upcoming traffic conditions or for a turn, or to avoid a road hazard. • As with other drivers, a motorcyclist can forget to cancel a turn signal after completing a turn. Drivers of other vehicles must never assume the motorcyclist’s intentions. Drivers should make sure they know where they motorcyclists is going before moving into their path. • Motorcycles are often difficult to see in traffic. Operators of motorcycles may take advantage of the size and maneuverability of their vehicles to cut between other vehicles. Safety • Drivers of other vehicles must use caution when turning in front of oncoming motorcycles. When making a right turn, drivers should be prepared for motorcycles that may encroach in the space between their vehicle and the curb. Drivers should check their mirrors often to make sure they know the location of all vehicles that may be entering a blind spot behind or along the side of their vehicle. • Automobile drivers take for granted the ability of their vehicles to handle minor road hazards such as potholes, bumps and railroad tracks. While these may be minor problems for most vehicles, they can be major problems for motorcyclists. Cyclists may need to maneuver quickly to avoid these hazards. 12
Q1    16  Sharing the Road With warmer weather right around the bend, increasing numbers of motorcycles will begin to take...
Q1 ‘16 Sharing the Road With warmer weather right around the bend, increasing numbers of motorcycles will begin to take to the roadways of America. Many people enjoy traveling by motorcycle, and rightly so. • As you move in to the traffic lane ahead of a motorcycle, drivers should use good space management, checking their mirrors regularly to verify the location of the motorcycles and other vehicles. They are fuel-efficient, occupy little space and can be fun to ride. However, motorcyclists are more vulnerable to injury than drivers of most other motor vehicles if they become involved in a collision. • When driving behind a motorcycle, drivers should increase their following distance to provide enough space for the motorcyclists to maneuver or stop in an emergency. • If being overtaken by a motorcycle, drivers should maintain lane position and speed. Motorcyclists should be allowed to complete the pass and assume proper lane position as quickly as possible. They deserve the same courtesies given to other motorists. Watch for the unexpected and give motorcyclists their share of the road. • Motorcycles are more difficult to see than other types of vehicles on the road. For this reason, it is important to exercise caution when motorcycles are present on the roadway. • Collisions between motorcycles and other vehicles are most likely to occur at intersections. Motorcycles cast a narrow silhouette and are usually shorter in length than most motor vehicles. When approaching intersections, they can appear farther away than they actually are because of their limited profile. In addition, it can be difficult to judge how fast motorcycles are traveling. Drivers need to make sure they keep the motorcycle in their line of vision and know its speed before turning at or entering an intersection. • Misinterpreting a motorcyclist’s intentions can be dangerous. Be aware that skilled motorcyclists change positions in the traffic lane to allow other drivers to see them better. Motorcyclists often change position in their lane to prepare for upcoming traffic conditions or for a turn, or to avoid a road hazard. • As with other drivers, a motorcyclist can forget to cancel a turn signal after completing a turn. Drivers of other vehicles must never assume the motorcyclist’s intentions. Drivers should make sure they know where they motorcyclists is going before moving into their path. • Motorcycles are often difficult to see in traffic. Operators of motorcycles may take advantage of the size and maneuverability of their vehicles to cut between other vehicles. Safety • Drivers of other vehicles must use caution when turning in front of oncoming motorcycles. When making a right turn, drivers should be prepared for motorcycles that may encroach in the space between their vehicle and the curb. Drivers should check their mirrors often to make sure they know the location of all vehicles that may be entering a blind spot behind or along the side of their vehicle. • Automobile drivers take for granted the ability of their vehicles to handle minor road hazards such as potholes, bumps and railroad tracks. While these may be minor problems for most vehicles, they can be major problems for motorcyclists. Cyclists may need to maneuver quickly to avoid these hazards. 12
Q1    16  Sharing the Road With warmer weather right around the bend, increasing numbers of motorcycles will begin to take...
Q1 ‘16 Feeling the Pressure? Checking your tires is critical. Over-the-road truck drivers pass through many different altitudes and climates as they travel across the country. The warmer and higher it is in a given location, the higher your air pressure will be and the opposite is also true. Low or high air pressure is the number one killer of tires and fuel mileage. Keep the tire pressure as close to the company specifications as possible, and you shouldn’t have any severe problems. As important as it is, tire pressure is one of the most commonly neglected attributes of any vehicle. Yes, checking the pressure and keeping it on the recommended level could take a bit of time and it may be troublesome, but those few minutes could actually save you much in the way of fuel, effort, the tires themselves and possibly a life. Can we say, “No Thank You,” to a blowout? "Low or high air pressure is the number one killer of tires and fuel mileage. Keep the tire pressure as close to the company specifications as possible, and you shouldn’t have any severe problems." Maintenance Our recommended tire pressures are posted along the sides of each trailer and along the upper fender-well of the tractor. Our tire inflation system works by inflating each trailer tire to a maximum of 85 PSI; however, many of them cannot decrease the tire pressure by any means. If your trailer tire pressure reading is higher than 85 PSI, you will need to manually deflate it to 80 PSI (the air inflation system will pump it back up to 85 PSI). If your tractor tire pressure reading is higher than 100 PSI, you will need to manually deflate it to 100 PSI. If you have any questions about the recommendations or the automatic inflation system, please contact your Driver Manager. So what is the importance of keeping an eye on your tire pressure? It may simply be the air pressure inside the tire, but having uneven, low, or even very high tire pressure can lead to many issues. Let's start off with the low tire pressure. If this is the case, the tires may or may not look flat. Only checking the tire’s pressure will provide a definitive answer. When underinflated, the tire wears more since the area of the tire that is in contact with the road is much wider. For steer tires, this means it would be a bit difficult to turn since there is more resistance from the tire due to the wider contact area. Insufficiently pressurized tires usually indicate a tire with holes or leaks and in due time, it may deflate completely. Having a very high tire pressure, on the other hand, may also make it harder to turn the vehicle since your tires do not have enough contact area with the road. It simply doesn't have enough grip for better control. Another concern is the potential for a blowout. When overinflated, your tires won't have enough room if the air expands further due to heat. The additional space must be found somewhere – outside the tire. Additionally, uneven tire pressures may give you an uncomfortable drive since the usual symptom is difficulty in turning to one direction. Having incorrect tire pressures can lessen the life of your tires and could be a potential cause of accidents. It is suggested that you check your tires at least once a day, and it's better if the tire is cool. If it's hot, the reading on the gauge may not be accurate since expanding hot air inside the tires will increase the pressure. To help remember, create a routine once each day (say, your first fuel stop of the day) to start the habit-forming process. As you can see, it does help if you maintain optimal tire pressure and it could save you a lot in the long run. Let's always put safety as the top priority. 14
Q1    16  Feeling the Pressure  Checking your tires is critical. Over-the-road truck drivers pass through many different a...
Q1 ‘16 Feeling the Pressure? Checking your tires is critical. Over-the-road truck drivers pass through many different altitudes and climates as they travel across the country. The warmer and higher it is in a given location, the higher your air pressure will be and the opposite is also true. Low or high air pressure is the number one killer of tires and fuel mileage. Keep the tire pressure as close to the company specifications as possible, and you shouldn’t have any severe problems. As important as it is, tire pressure is one of the most commonly neglected attributes of any vehicle. Yes, checking the pressure and keeping it on the recommended level could take a bit of time and it may be troublesome, but those few minutes could actually save you much in the way of fuel, effort, the tires themselves and possibly a life. Can we say, “No Thank You,” to a blowout? "Low or high air pressure is the number one killer of tires and fuel mileage. Keep the tire pressure as close to the company specifications as possible, and you shouldn’t have any severe problems." Maintenance Our recommended tire pressures are posted along the sides of each trailer and along the upper fender-well of the tractor. Our tire inflation system works by inflating each trailer tire to a maximum of 85 PSI; however, many of them cannot decrease the tire pressure by any means. If your trailer tire pressure reading is higher than 85 PSI, you will need to manually deflate it to 80 PSI (the air inflation system will pump it back up to 85 PSI). If your tractor tire pressure reading is higher than 100 PSI, you will need to manually deflate it to 100 PSI. If you have any questions about the recommendations or the automatic inflation system, please contact your Driver Manager. So what is the importance of keeping an eye on your tire pressure? It may simply be the air pressure inside the tire, but having uneven, low, or even very high tire pressure can lead to many issues. Let's start off with the low tire pressure. If this is the case, the tires may or may not look flat. Only checking the tire’s pressure will provide a definitive answer. When underinflated, the tire wears more since the area of the tire that is in contact with the road is much wider. For steer tires, this means it would be a bit difficult to turn since there is more resistance from the tire due to the wider contact area. Insufficiently pressurized tires usually indicate a tire with holes or leaks and in due time, it may deflate completely. Having a very high tire pressure, on the other hand, may also make it harder to turn the vehicle since your tires do not have enough contact area with the road. It simply doesn't have enough grip for better control. Another concern is the potential for a blowout. When overinflated, your tires won't have enough room if the air expands further due to heat. The additional space must be found somewhere – outside the tire. Additionally, uneven tire pressures may give you an uncomfortable drive since the usual symptom is difficulty in turning to one direction. Having incorrect tire pressures can lessen the life of your tires and could be a potential cause of accidents. It is suggested that you check your tires at least once a day, and it's better if the tire is cool. If it's hot, the reading on the gauge may not be accurate since expanding hot air inside the tires will increase the pressure. To help remember, create a routine once each day (say, your first fuel stop of the day) to start the habit-forming process. As you can see, it does help if you maintain optimal tire pressure and it could save you a lot in the long run. Let's always put safety as the top priority. 14
Q1    16  Feeling the Pressure  Checking your tires is critical. Over-the-road truck drivers pass through many different a...
Q1 ‘16 Calling Out the Silent Killer Avoiding high blood pressure. The average driver’s lifestyle consists of weeks at a time on the road accompanied by unhealthy meals and little physical activity. This diet and exercise plan describes many non-driving professions in America as well, just to be fair. As we all know, this is an unhealthy way to live and needs to be changed for the better so as not to lead to health issues like hypertension, more commonly known as high blood pressure. Just to clarify, blood pressure is the measurement of the force against the walls of your arteries as your heart pumps blood through your body and is made up of two numbers — the systolic (top number), and the diastolic (bottom number). The systolic pressure is the force the blood exerts on artery walls when the heart pumps, and the diastolic is the force exerted when the heart relaxes. How serious is high blood pressure among drivers? High blood pressure leads to a greater risk of chronic diseases like heart disease, kidney disease, strokes, eye damage, and atherosclerosis. High blood pressure can keep you from getting your CDL, as blood pressure levels at or above 180/110 are DOT disqualifying factors. Not only can it threaten your life, it can threaten your livelihood. I have hypertension. How do I lower it? SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE (TOP NUMBER) DIASTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE (BOTTOM NUMBER) CATEGORY Below 120 Below 80 Normal blood pressure 120-139 80-89 Pre-hypertension 140-159 90-99 Stage 1 hypertension 160 or higher 100 or higher Stage 2 hypertension The chart above details healthy and unhealthy blood pressure readings. "High blood pressure can keep you from getting your CDL." You can lower high blood pressure by incorporating more physical activity into your daily life. Managing your stress, reducing your sodium intake to fewer than 1500 mg, and drinking and smoking less (or quitting!) will also help. Increasing your intake of potassium can also help to prevent high blood pressure and strokes. Try eating bananas, spinach, citrus fruits, avocados, and broccoli — all are high in potassium. Why is high blood pressure so common? Human Resources Hypertension is common because drivers possess many of the habits and risk factors for high blood pressure including… Diet Many don’t eat as healthy as they Stress Driving is one of the most should. Extended hours on the road and long nights lead drivers to the call of fast food, which is a triple threat to your blood pressure – high in sodium, fat, and calories. Obesity is a leading cause of high blood pressure, so prepare your own meals in the truck and buy fresh groceries for a healthier diet. stressful jobs out there. Workplace stressors like traffic, loneliness, fear of assault or vehicle accident, finances and insufficient sleep can elevate blood pressure and stress levels. Exercise After 11 hours on the road, many don’t want to stop and work out for an hour. Who can really blame them? The last thing most people want to do after work is more work. Easy solution: get up and do it in the morning before your day. You’ll get it out of the way and it’ll give you a nice energy boost! Smoking The last major risk factor for high blood pressure that’s common in truckers is smoking. The nicotine in cigarettes increases blood pressure and heart rate. Fortunately, hypertension is pretty easy to avoid simply by adopting a healthier lifestyle. Workout regularly (it doesn’t have to be anything super intense – keep walking) and make healthier meal choices heavily focused on fresh fruits, veggies, and protein. Quit smoking and do what you can to de-stress, and you’ll be on the road to a healthy heart and life! 16
Q1    16  Calling Out the Silent Killer Avoiding high blood pressure. The average driver   s lifestyle consists of weeks a...
Q1 ‘16 Calling Out the Silent Killer Avoiding high blood pressure. The average driver’s lifestyle consists of weeks at a time on the road accompanied by unhealthy meals and little physical activity. This diet and exercise plan describes many non-driving professions in America as well, just to be fair. As we all know, this is an unhealthy way to live and needs to be changed for the better so as not to lead to health issues like hypertension, more commonly known as high blood pressure. Just to clarify, blood pressure is the measurement of the force against the walls of your arteries as your heart pumps blood through your body and is made up of two numbers — the systolic (top number), and the diastolic (bottom number). The systolic pressure is the force the blood exerts on artery walls when the heart pumps, and the diastolic is the force exerted when the heart relaxes. How serious is high blood pressure among drivers? High blood pressure leads to a greater risk of chronic diseases like heart disease, kidney disease, strokes, eye damage, and atherosclerosis. High blood pressure can keep you from getting your CDL, as blood pressure levels at or above 180/110 are DOT disqualifying factors. Not only can it threaten your life, it can threaten your livelihood. I have hypertension. How do I lower it? SYSTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE (TOP NUMBER) DIASTOLIC BLOOD PRESSURE (BOTTOM NUMBER) CATEGORY Below 120 Below 80 Normal blood pressure 120-139 80-89 Pre-hypertension 140-159 90-99 Stage 1 hypertension 160 or higher 100 or higher Stage 2 hypertension The chart above details healthy and unhealthy blood pressure readings. "High blood pressure can keep you from getting your CDL." You can lower high blood pressure by incorporating more physical activity into your daily life. Managing your stress, reducing your sodium intake to fewer than 1500 mg, and drinking and smoking less (or quitting!) will also help. Increasing your intake of potassium can also help to prevent high blood pressure and strokes. Try eating bananas, spinach, citrus fruits, avocados, and broccoli — all are high in potassium. Why is high blood pressure so common? Human Resources Hypertension is common because drivers possess many of the habits and risk factors for high blood pressure including… Diet Many don’t eat as healthy as they Stress Driving is one of the most should. Extended hours on the road and long nights lead drivers to the call of fast food, which is a triple threat to your blood pressure – high in sodium, fat, and calories. Obesity is a leading cause of high blood pressure, so prepare your own meals in the truck and buy fresh groceries for a healthier diet. stressful jobs out there. Workplace stressors like traffic, loneliness, fear of assault or vehicle accident, finances and insufficient sleep can elevate blood pressure and stress levels. Exercise After 11 hours on the road, many don’t want to stop and work out for an hour. Who can really blame them? The last thing most people want to do after work is more work. Easy solution: get up and do it in the morning before your day. You’ll get it out of the way and it’ll give you a nice energy boost! Smoking The last major risk factor for high blood pressure that’s common in truckers is smoking. The nicotine in cigarettes increases blood pressure and heart rate. Fortunately, hypertension is pretty easy to avoid simply by adopting a healthier lifestyle. Workout regularly (it doesn’t have to be anything super intense – keep walking) and make healthier meal choices heavily focused on fresh fruits, veggies, and protein. Quit smoking and do what you can to de-stress, and you’ll be on the road to a healthy heart and life! 16
Q1    16  Calling Out the Silent Killer Avoiding high blood pressure. The average driver   s lifestyle consists of weeks a...
Q1 ‘16 Did you know that a group of art-hippies imported from San Francisco built a stand alone piece of public art on Route 66 west of Amarillo, Texas? angle as the Great Pyramid of Giza. Together they face west in a line, and they vary from a 1949 Club Sedan to the 1963 Sedan de Ville. With their tail fins held high for all to see on the empty Texas panhandle. Driver Services The installation is named Cadillac Ranch, and it was originally designed purely to baffle tourist and locals alike. To create the work, ten Caddies were driven into a field, and half-buried nose-down in the dirt. Fun fact, they are supposedly buried at the same 18
Q1    16  Did you know that a group of art-hippies imported from San Francisco built a stand alone piece of public art on ...
Q1 ‘16 Did you know that a group of art-hippies imported from San Francisco built a stand alone piece of public art on Route 66 west of Amarillo, Texas? angle as the Great Pyramid of Giza. Together they face west in a line, and they vary from a 1949 Club Sedan to the 1963 Sedan de Ville. With their tail fins held high for all to see on the empty Texas panhandle. Driver Services The installation is named Cadillac Ranch, and it was originally designed purely to baffle tourist and locals alike. To create the work, ten Caddies were driven into a field, and half-buried nose-down in the dirt. Fun fact, they are supposedly buried at the same 18
Q1    16  Did you know that a group of art-hippies imported from San Francisco built a stand alone piece of public art on ...
Q1 ‘16 Laura was a victim, and this is her story: “I was just 12 years old when my dad left. Mom didn’t have any real job skills, so she got a job cleaning bathrooms at the local truck stop. One night after work, momma made me get all dressed up and she even put makeup on me. I was so excited because I never got to wear makeup before; she said that I had to look really pretty because I was going to make us lots of money. I had no idea what she meant by that, but if I did, I would have ran away that night. A girl’s first time is supposed to be special. Mine was far from it. I had my self-worth, dignity, and childhood stolen from me that night, not once but several times, and all for $150.00. Human trafficking on the road. Driver Services We know it happens, especially in truck stops, but we ignore it, turn our heads, mind our own business, and pretend it isn’t going on around us. If you spend any amount of time at a truck stop, travel center, or even rest areas, you may hear deals being made on the CB or see young ladies and men get in a truck after a “signal” is given. They are called Lot Lizards, Commercial Property, hookers, etc... But the one thing they aren’t often called is VICTIM. Later that night, or maybe it was early the next morning, momma took me home and cleaned me up and told me that I was a big girl now. When I cried, she would beat me, and then make it up to me by buying me new clothes and more makeup. On the night of my 15th birthday, after she dropped me off at the truck stop, momma left and never came back. I had no problem getting rides to whatever town or city that I wanted to go to, and I always had money. That’s one lesson momma taught me: Make sure you always have money. I moved from town to town, truck stop to truck stop until I was 17 years old. One night, after making a “deal” over the CB, I knocked on the door of the truck, and it was a sting. My life changed that night. I was shoved in a cop car and taken to the local jail where I was treated like the trash that I was. There were several “ladies of the night” in the jail cell with me. One lady looked me up and down and asked how old I was. I told her that I was 17; and then she said that she wanted to hear my story. I had nothing but time, so eventually I told her everything. When I finished, she and a few other ladies were crying. I didn’t understand what the big deal was. I accepted my lot in life, and did pretty well. I had some money socked away, and I even owned a car; granted it was an old used beater, but it served its purpose. Much to my surprise, this lady started yelling for a guard. When the guard finally came around to shut her up, she told him that I was a minor and needed help. Needed help? I didn’t’ need help, I just needed out, so I could get back to “work.” I was taken that night to a group home and a social worker was assigned to my case. Everything happened so fast that my head was spinning! For the first time since I was 12, I was made to dress like a respectable young lady, and go to school like a normal person. This was a huge adjustment, and to say that I was a problem child and spent many a day in afterschool detention was putting it mildly. No one at the school knew my story, except for the principal and counselor, but I had such low self-esteem that I felt everyone knew how dirty I was, and I felt like they were always talking about me, laughing at me. I was made to go see a shrink, Mrs. Smith. I resisted and kept quiet for the first month, but Mrs. Smith didn’t give up on me. Finally I broke down, and for the 2nd time in my life, I told my story. I’m a grown woman now, with a respectable job, and am a productive member of society; but it took me many years to realize that I was a victim. I didn’t choose my former life, I was thrown into it and it wasn’t my fault. If only one trucker, one John, would’ve seen me for the child that I was, and called the police sooner, I could’ve been spared years of... well years of being a worthless piece of trash. I know that is harsh, but that is how I saw myself. I am writing my story, so that you may put an end to another girl’s story, before it’s too late.” If you see or hear anyone being a victim of prostitution, please call the National Human Trafficking Resource Center hotline at 1-888-373-7888 or local law enforcement. You can also visit the website: http://truckersagainsttrafficking.org to learn more about combating human trafficking. 20
Q1    16  Laura was a victim, and this is her story     I was just 12 years old when my dad left. Mom didn   t have any re...
Q1 ‘16 Laura was a victim, and this is her story: “I was just 12 years old when my dad left. Mom didn’t have any real job skills, so she got a job cleaning bathrooms at the local truck stop. One night after work, momma made me get all dressed up and she even put makeup on me. I was so excited because I never got to wear makeup before; she said that I had to look really pretty because I was going to make us lots of money. I had no idea what she meant by that, but if I did, I would have ran away that night. A girl’s first time is supposed to be special. Mine was far from it. I had my self-worth, dignity, and childhood stolen from me that night, not once but several times, and all for $150.00. Human trafficking on the road. Driver Services We know it happens, especially in truck stops, but we ignore it, turn our heads, mind our own business, and pretend it isn’t going on around us. If you spend any amount of time at a truck stop, travel center, or even rest areas, you may hear deals being made on the CB or see young ladies and men get in a truck after a “signal” is given. They are called Lot Lizards, Commercial Property, hookers, etc... But the one thing they aren’t often called is VICTIM. Later that night, or maybe it was early the next morning, momma took me home and cleaned me up and told me that I was a big girl now. When I cried, she would beat me, and then make it up to me by buying me new clothes and more makeup. On the night of my 15th birthday, after she dropped me off at the truck stop, momma left and never came back. I had no problem getting rides to whatever town or city that I wanted to go to, and I always had money. That’s one lesson momma taught me: Make sure you always have money. I moved from town to town, truck stop to truck stop until I was 17 years old. One night, after making a “deal” over the CB, I knocked on the door of the truck, and it was a sting. My life changed that night. I was shoved in a cop car and taken to the local jail where I was treated like the trash that I was. There were several “ladies of the night” in the jail cell with me. One lady looked me up and down and asked how old I was. I told her that I was 17; and then she said that she wanted to hear my story. I had nothing but time, so eventually I told her everything. When I finished, she and a few other ladies were crying. I didn’t understand what the big deal was. I accepted my lot in life, and did pretty well. I had some money socked away, and I even owned a car; granted it was an old used beater, but it served its purpose. Much to my surprise, this lady started yelling for a guard. When the guard finally came around to shut her up, she told him that I was a minor and needed help. Needed help? I didn’t’ need help, I just needed out, so I could get back to “work.” I was taken that night to a group home and a social worker was assigned to my case. Everything happened so fast that my head was spinning! For the first time since I was 12, I was made to dress like a respectable young lady, and go to school like a normal person. This was a huge adjustment, and to say that I was a problem child and spent many a day in afterschool detention was putting it mildly. No one at the school knew my story, except for the principal and counselor, but I had such low self-esteem that I felt everyone knew how dirty I was, and I felt like they were always talking about me, laughing at me. I was made to go see a shrink, Mrs. Smith. I resisted and kept quiet for the first month, but Mrs. Smith didn’t give up on me. Finally I broke down, and for the 2nd time in my life, I told my story. I’m a grown woman now, with a respectable job, and am a productive member of society; but it took me many years to realize that I was a victim. I didn’t choose my former life, I was thrown into it and it wasn’t my fault. If only one trucker, one John, would’ve seen me for the child that I was, and called the police sooner, I could’ve been spared years of... well years of being a worthless piece of trash. I know that is harsh, but that is how I saw myself. I am writing my story, so that you may put an end to another girl’s story, before it’s too late.” If you see or hear anyone being a victim of prostitution, please call the National Human Trafficking Resource Center hotline at 1-888-373-7888 or local law enforcement. You can also visit the website: http://truckersagainsttrafficking.org to learn more about combating human trafficking. 20
Q1    16  Laura was a victim, and this is her story     I was just 12 years old when my dad left. Mom didn   t have any re...
Earn up to $150 for working towards your New Year’s Resolution! Employees on the BCBS of GA medical plan can earn a $50 gift card for completing an online health assessment & $100 if your covered spouse completes it too! To learn more & complete the well-being assessment: • Visit anthem.com & login • Go to the Health & Wellness page • Select Healthy Lifestyles *Each adult family member can earn up to $150 each year. Members earn a $50 incentive at each 3,000, 5,000 and 10,000 point milestone. You can quickly achieve your first milestone of 3,000 points by completing the Well-Being Assessment and setting up your Well-Being Plan. 22
Earn up to  150 for working towards your New Year   s Resolution  Employees on the BCBS of GA medical plan can earn a  50 ...
Earn up to $150 for working towards your New Year’s Resolution! Employees on the BCBS of GA medical plan can earn a $50 gift card for completing an online health assessment & $100 if your covered spouse completes it too! To learn more & complete the well-being assessment: • Visit anthem.com & login • Go to the Health & Wellness page • Select Healthy Lifestyles *Each adult family member can earn up to $150 each year. Members earn a $50 incentive at each 3,000, 5,000 and 10,000 point milestone. You can quickly achieve your first milestone of 3,000 points by completing the Well-Being Assessment and setting up your Well-Being Plan. 22
Earn up to  150 for working towards your New Year   s Resolution  Employees on the BCBS of GA medical plan can earn a  50 ...
FIRST QUARTER 2016 Driven to Serve
FIRST QUARTER 2016  Driven to Serve