Information Resource Guide 2014
Information Resource Guide  2014
Program Agenda ______________________________________________________________________________ Targeted Audience: Local Elected Officials; City Managers; Public Works Directors; Community Leaders and city/legislative staff wanting an overview of regional water system SESSION 1: Date: April 29, 2014 Time: 9 am to 12 pm Location: Upper District Board Room 1) History of the San Gabriel Valley Watershed a) Overview of SGV Watershed and Water Sources – Shane Chapman  Imported Supplies o Colorado River and State Water Project  Local Supplies o Groundwater, Recycled Water, Stormwater, Wastewater b) Who Provides Our Water – Shane Chapman  Agencies involved in your water: federal, state, regional, county, and local  Producers: municipalities and retailers.  How rates are set and who sets them c) Water Supply and Outlook – Tony Zampiello  Watermaster Overview  Managing the Basin  2014 Drought 2) An Integrated Approach to Water Sustainability a) Water Supply Reliability: Challenges and Solutions - Reymundo Trejo  Overview of Integrated Resources Water Plan o Water recycling, stormwater, wastewater treatment, storage, and conservation b) Water Quality – Randy Schoellerman  History of Basin’s Water Quality  Groundwater Contamination  Treatment Processes c) Stormwater Solutions – Mary Ann Lutz  Regulations (Clean Water Act; NPDES MS4 Permit)  Low-Impact Development (LID) d) Current Water Policies and Legislation – Shane Chapman  Bay Delta Conservation Plan
Program Agenda ______________________________________________________________________________ Targeted Audience  Local Ele...
 California Water Action Plan  Drinking Water Program  Emergency Drought Legislation  2014 Water Bond Measure e) Overview of Conservation Programs – Shane Chapman  Outreach Campaign  Introduction to the Water Smart City Program  Bewaterwise.com and socalwatersmart.com, saveourh2o.com SESSION 2: Water Supply Tour Dates: May 22, 2014 & June 26, 2014 1) SGV Water Supply Solutions Tour: Facilities, Current Projects and Service Area a) Brief Recap Overview of Upper Service Area – Upper District Headquarters b) Historical Development of Water Infrastructure & Supply  Morris Dam  San Gabriel Dam c) Groundwater Replenishment & Stormwater Capture  Santa Fe Dam and Spreading Grounds at 210 & 605 Freeway Intersection  San Gabriel Drop Structure d) Water Quality  Baldwin Park Operable Unit e) Recycled Water  Current projects
    California Water Action Plan     Drinking Water Program     Emergency Drought Legislation     2014 Water Bond Measure ...
Table of Contents ________________________________________________ TAB 1 - San Gabriel Valley Water Agencies Overview      Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District Three Valleys Municipal Water District San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District Main San Gabriel Basin Watermaster San Gabriel Basin Water Quality Authority (WQA) TAB 2 - San Gabriel Valley Council of Governments Resources  SGVCOG Water Strategic Plan TAB 3 - Agencies/Organizations Involved in the San Gabriel River Watershed TAB 4 - Where Your Water Comes From      Metropolitan Water District of Southern CA (MWD) overview MWD Member Agency Map CA Water Conveyance Map Water Supply Chart for SGV Cities Water Producers Chart for SGV Cities TAB 5 - Statewide Issues      Southern CA Water Committee “Pump Up the Volume” stormwater overview BDCP Fast Facts Sheet BDCP EIR/EIS Alternatives Fact Sheet 2014 MWD Water Bond Priorities San Gabriel Valley Caucus letter to Association of California Water Agencies: Support for Legacy Groundwater Remediation Funding in a 2014 Water Bond 5/29/13 TAB 6 - Water Conservation Resources     Southern CA Water Committee, Water Conservation in Southern CA Overview ACWA Save Our Water 20% Water Use Reduction Infographic (English & Spanish Versions) Drought – Landscaping/Tree Watering Infographic Socalwatersmart.com Residential and Commercial Rebate Program Overview TAB 7 - Speaker Presentations
Table of Contents ________________________________________________ TAB 1 - San Gabriel Valley Water Agencies Overview     ...
Upper District at a Glance The Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District (Upper District) was formed by voters of 22 cities and Los Angeles County unincorporated areas on December 8, 1959 to help sustain adequate water supplies in the rapidly-developing San Gabriel Valley. In 1963, residents of the Upper District voted to join the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD) to import water from the Colorado River, and later the State Water Project, into the region. After a decade of statewide drought and strict environmental regulations, solutions now flow from the Upper District towards a future that is less reliant on imported water aimed at increasing water conservation, capturing more local stormwater, and water recycling. Today, Upper District’s service area encompasses approximately 144 square miles and includes all or parts of 22 different cities and portions of unincorporated Los Angeles County with more than 950,000 residents. We partner with many public and private entities to provide a sustainable, high quality water supply to residents and businesses within the greater San Gabriel Valley. Consistent with its motto of “Where Solutions Flow,” Upper District is widely recognized for its customer service orientation, community involvement, and creativity in promoting water quality, recycling, and conservation. Upper District is governed by a five-member Board of Directors representing five geographic divisions within the district’s boundaries. The Board’s mission is to achieve the following: Mission Statement   Provide a reliable supply of high quality drinking water at the lowest possible cost Provide a drought-proof and economical supply of recycled water for industrial and irrigation uses  Provide and complete projects that aggressively advance water use efficiency throughout the San Gabriel Valley It is our goal to pursue this mission in a manner that is responsive to our public while protective of our environment The Upper District is managed on a day-to-day basis by a professional management team with expertise in operations, engineering, finance, legal affairs, government and community affairs, and water conservation. The Upper District has a $21.2 million operating budget for fiscal year 2012-2013 and ten highly dedicated employees. Upper District’s future is very bright, filled with complex challenges and exciting opportunities.
Upper District at a Glance The Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District  Upper District  was formed by voters of ...
District Service Area THE UPPER SAN GABRIEL VALLEY MUNICIPAL WATER DISTRICT (UPPER DISTRICT), incorporated in 1959, covers approximately 144 square miles and includes all or parts of 17 cities and portions of unincorporated Los Angeles County with more than 950,000 residents. The Upper District partners with many public and private entities to provide a sustainable, high quality water supply to residents and businesses within the greater San Gabriel Valley. Consistent with its motto of “Where Solutions Flow,” the Upper District is widely recognized for its customer service orientation, community involvement, and creativity in promoting water quality, water recycling, and water conservation. Utilizing MWD’s distribution system, the Upper District provides wholesale water service to local water suppliers through the nine service connections listed below. Approximately 20,000 to 50,000 acre-feet of imported water is served through these connections each year. The majority of the water is used for groundwater replenishment.
District Service Area THE UPPER SAN GABRIEL VALLEY MUNICIPAL WATER DISTRICT  UPPER DISTRICT , incorporated in 1959, covers...
Three Valleys Municipal Water District Three Valleys Municipal Water District was established in 1950 by a vote of the people. Originally, called the Pomona Valley Municipal Water District, the name was changed in 1981 to better reflect the areas served -- the Pomona, Walnut and eastern San Gabriel Valleys. Today, the District's service area covers 133 square miles. In the Beginning . . . Scrub sage covered the inland valleys of Los Angeles County, intersected by ribbons of oaks and sycamores along intermittent streams. By 1900 small settlements were established, and over the years a thriving citrus industry developed, irrigated by wells tapping underground aquifers. As the county's population grew, orchards gave way to housing and commerce. Civic leaders understood that the wells would run dry unless a new source of water could be obtained. From this realization sprang a new institution, the Metropolitan Water District (MWD), and by 1941 MWD first delivered water "imported" to the region through the 242-mile-long Colorado River Aqueduct. Water leaders in the Pomona Valley soon made plans to join MWD and obtain access to Colorado River supplies. In 1950 their efforts were rewarded; voters approved formation of the Pomona Valley Municipal Water District by an overwhelming 80-to-1 margin. Later that year MWD annexed Pomona Valley Municipal Water District, and a supplemental water supply was assured. In 1981 the name of the District was changed to Three Valleys Municipal Water District to better reflect the area served, which includes the Pomona Valley, Walnut Valley and eastern San Gabriel Valley. The Miramar Water and Hydroelectric Facility was constructed in 1987 at a cost of $30 million. The Facility was financed with a revenue bond and letter of credit under a three-way partnership between Three Valleys, the City of La Verne, and Golden State Water Company (at the time, known as "Southern California Water Co."). Mission Statement Three Valleys Municipal Water District's mission is to supplement and enhance local water supplies to meet our region's needs in a reliable and cost-effective manner.
Three Valleys Municipal Water District Three Valleys Municipal Water District was established in 1950 by a vote of the peo...
District Service Area Three Valleys Municipal Water District was established in 1950 by a vote of the people. Originally, called the Pomona Valley Municipal Water District, the name was changed in 1981 to better reflect the areas served -- the Pomona, Walnut and eastern San Gabriel Valleys. Today, the District's service area covers 133 square miles.
District Service Area Three Valleys Municipal Water District was established in 1950 by a vote of the people. Originally, ...
San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District The San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District was formed in 1959 after winning approval from the voters of Alhambra, Azusa, Monterey Park, and Sierra Madre. In anticipation of its long-term water needs, the Water District entered into a contract with the State of California Department of Water Resources in 1962 for the delivery of 25,000 acre-feet of water per year from the State Water Project. In 1964, the contract was amended to allow for 28,800 acre-feet. Today the District is one of 29 State Water Contractors who obtain water from the vast State Water Project and who pay for retirement of the bond used to construct it, as well as its operation and maintenance. In 1969, the Water District constructed the Devil Canyon-Azusa Pipeline to deliver water from the State Water Project to the Main San Gabriel Basin. Starting in 1975 and continuing today, the Water District has been importing water from Northern California for replenishment of the San Gabriel Basin. In 1981, an additional outlet was added to the pipeline at San Dimas Wash. Citrus Spreading Grounds. In 1985, the Water District installed a 1.05 megawatt hydroelectric power plant at the San Dimas turnout to generate electricity in conjunction with its supplemental water deliveries. In 1995, we completed an extension of the Devil Canyon-Azusa Pipeline from Azusa to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works' San Gabriel Canyon Spreading Grounds. The extension provides us with greater flexibility in delivering water to the Main San Gabriel Basin and better serving member cities. In 1998, another outlet was constructed at Big Dalton Wash to utilize the LA County Department of Public Works’ Mission Statement The San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District is dedicated to providing reliable water for the communities of Alhambra, Azusa, Monterey Park and Sierra Madre in a cost-effective manner
San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District The San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District was formed in 1959 after winni...
District Service Area The Water District’s service area is spread over twenty-seven square miles and includes the cities of Alhambra, Azusa, Monterey Park and Sierra Madre. Combined, we serve a population of over 200,000 people. By 2025, the population is expected to exceed 250,000. The San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District has five divisions: Division I is the northern section of Alhambra Division II is the northern section of Monterey Park and the southern section of Alhambra Division III is the remainder of Monterey Park Division IV is Sierra Madre Division V is Azusa.
District Service Area The Water District   s service area is spread over twenty-seven square miles and includes the cities...
Main San Gabriel Basin Watermaster Main San Gabriel Basin Watermaster is the agency charged with administering adjudicated water rights and managing groundwater resources within the watershed and groundwater basin known as the Main San Gabriel Basin. Mission Statement "The Main San Gabriel Basin Watermaster, a nine-person board appointed by the Los Angeles County Superior Court, administers and enforces the provisions of the Judgment which established water rights and the responsibility for efficient management of the quantity and quality of the Basin's ground water." History Watermaster was created in 1973 by the California Superior Court of Los Angeles County to administer the Basin's adjudicated water rights and to provide a basin-wide governing body for management of water resources. Background Beginning in the 1940s, the San Gabriel Valley experienced a period of rapid urbanization, which led to an increased demand for water drawn from the Main San Gabriel Basin. The ensuing rise in water consumption--along with an extended period of drought--had by the 1950s put the Basin into a state of overdraft, where water production from the Basin exceeded the amount that could be replaced. As a result of the decrease in available water supply, parties downstream of the Basin became especially concerned. These downstream water users rely on the Main San Gabriel Basin for a large portion of their natural water supply, as much of it comes from the Basin by way of outflow through Whittier Narrows. Legal action was initiated on behalf of the downstream users, resulting in a court decision which requires the Upper Area (Main San Gabriel Basin) users to guarantee a source of water to the Lower Area or downstream users. For several years the Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District (Upper District) administered and took responsibility for the Upper Area's obligations to the Lower Area. The Upper District could not, however, assert control over all producers in the Basin because the district boundaries do not encompass the entire Basin. In 1968, at the request of producers, the Upper District filed a complaint that would adjudicate water rights in the Basin and would bring all Basin producers under control of one governing body. The final result was the entry of the Main San Gabriel Basin Judgment in 1973.
Main San Gabriel Basin Watermaster Main San Gabriel Basin Watermaster is the agency charged with administering adjudicated...
Service Area The Main San Gabriel Basin lies in eastern Los Angeles County, California. The hydrologic basin or watershed coincides with a portion of the upper San Gabriel River watershed, and the aquifer or groundwater basin underlies most of the San Gabriel Valley. The groundwater basin is bounded by the San Gabriel Mountains to the north, San Jose Hills to the east, Puente Hills to the south, and by a series of hills and the Raymond Fault to the west. The watershed is drained by the San Gabriel River and Rio Hondo, a tributary of the Los Angeles River. Principal water-bearing formations of the basin are unconsolidated and semiconsolidated sediments which range in size from coarse gravel to fine-grained sands. The major sources of natural recharge are infiltration of rainfall on the valley floor and percolation of runoff from the adjacent mountains. The basin also receives imported water and return flow from applied water. Surface area of the groundwater basin is approximately 167 square miles. The fresh water storage capacity of the basin is estimated to be about 8.6 million acre-feet. The physical groundwater basin is divided into two main parts, the Main Basin and the Puente Subbasin. The Puente Subbasin, lying in the southeast portion of the map above, is tributary to the Main Basin and hydraulically connected to it, with no barriers to groundwater movement. It is, however, not within the legal jurisdiction of Main San Gabriel Basin Watermaster, and is thus considered a separate entity for management purposes.
Service Area The Main San Gabriel Basin lies in eastern Los Angeles County, California. The hydrologic basin or watershed ...
San Gabriel Basin Water Quality Authority (WQA) The WQA was established by the State Legislature (SB1679) on February 11, 1993 to develop, finance and implement groundwater treatment programs in the San Gabriel Basin. The WQA is under the direction and leadership of a 7-member board. The board is comprised of one member from each of the overlying municipal water districts, one from a city with prescriptive water pumping rights and one from a city without prescriptive water pumping rights, and two members representing water producers in the San Gabriel Basin. The three municipal water districts are: 1) San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District; 2) Three Valley Municipal Water District; and 3) Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District. The WQA is empowered by the State of California to protect and promote the beneficial use of groundwater supplies in the San Gabriel Valley. The WQA was created by the State to address the problem of groundwater contamination in the San Gabriel Valley, in part by coordinating the plans and activities of state and federal agencies and others involved in the cleanup. The WQA is empowered by the State to address the problem of the migration of contaminated groundwater within the San Gabriel Basin and, in particular, the migration of contaminated water through the Whittier Narrows into the Central Basin. Since the WQA’s inception in 1993, its sponsored projects have been responsible for removing nearly 45 tons of contaminants from the San Gabriel Valley groundwater basin WQA projects have been responsible for removing more than 50 percent of the total contaminants removed from the basin since the contamination was discovered in 1979. The WQA currently operates the only shallow zone 1,4-Dioxane groundwater cleanup projects in the San Gabriel Valley that are actively preventing contamination from reaching deeper zone production wells. WQA assessments to accomplish cleanup of the San Gabriel Basin have averaged $7.25 per household per year. Mission Statement The WQA’s mission is to coordinate, plan, and implement groundwater quality management programs to efficiently remediate groundwater contamination and assist in preventing future contamination.
San Gabriel Basin Water Quality Authority  WQA  The WQA was established by the State Legislature  SB1679  on February 11, ...
Goals 1: Coordinate groundwater cleanup 2: Inform the Public 3: Characterize groundwater contamination 4: Assist PRP’s and RP’s 5: Prevent or minimize migration of contamination 6: Remove contamination quickly and efficiently 7: Protect groundwater resources 8: Fund WQA projects and programs with outside money
Goals 1  Coordinate groundwater cleanup 2  Inform the Public 3  Characterize groundwater contamination 4  Assist PRP   s a...
Water The San Gabriel Valley’s extensive groundwater supply is one of the distinguishing characteristics of the region. Ensuring that this water is clean and safe is critical to the growth and well-being of our communities. Water conservation and increased recycled water and stormwater usage is also necessary in order to minimize reliance on the imported water. Because of the importance of water to the region, in 2009 the SGVCOG expanded its membership to include the Valley’s three municipal water districts (Upper San Gabriel Valley MWD, Three Valley MWD, and San Gabriel Valley MWD). Proper management of stormwater runoff is another major challenge faced by SGVCOG member agencies. The recently approved NPDES MS4 Permit brings additional requirements for municipalities, and the SGVCOG has worked to educate member agencies and coordinate implementation efforts. Prior Successes:  Provided administrative support of LA Permit Group  Developed a priority water project list  Educated member agencies on NPDES MS4 permit requirements Key Outcomes:  Increasing funding for water projects, including specifically dedicated, ongoing funding sources for stormwater projects  Increasing compliance with State mandates and goals associated with water conservation and recycled water Issue Areas:
Water The San Gabriel Valley   s extensive groundwater supply is one of the distinguishing characteristics of the region. ...
Water Water Quality & MS4 NPDES Permit Background: Many activities have a detrimental impact on the water quality in the region. Many State and Federal policies and regulations exist that cities and agencies must meet to protect the region’s water quality. These projects represent a significant cost for cities. Goals:    Meeting water quality requirements with limited technical & funding resources Educating the public and elected officials on the legal basis for stormwater & water quality requirements Identifying & securing long-term funding sources for stormwater & water quality improvement projects Needs Assessment & Partnership Opportunities: LARWQCB Regulation IRWMP Funding US EPA Regulation Potential Gaps:  Educating local elected officials & the public  Coordinating efforts to secure funding  Providing administrative support to collective technical assistance efforts  Supporting regional public education & messaging regarding mechanisms related to water quality and stormwater management. WQA Groundwater Cleanup LA Permit Group Technical Assistance League of Cities/US Conference of Mayors Advocacy 2
Water Water Quality   MS4 NPDES Permit Background  Many activities have a detrimental impact on the water quality in the r...
Long-Term Strategies:     Establish Water Policy Committee and TAC to guide policy development and provide technical input to the Governing Board Support a County-wide group of elected officials and city managers tasked with securing long-term funding sources for storm water management Host informational events for San Gabriel Valley elected officials and the public to help them have a better understanding of water Provide administrative support to collective cities’ efforts to meet their water quality standards Recommended Near-Term Actions: 1. Convene Water Policy Committee and TAC to provide technical analysis and recommendations to the Governing Board related to water quality and the NPDES MS4 Permit. (These groups would coordinate with and cross-report to the EENR Committee.) 2. Attend Upper San Gabriel River and Rio Hondo River IRWMP Steering Committee meetings and prepare report to Water Policy on activities and potential roles for the COG. 3. Provide support to County-wide funding task force. 4. In cooperation with the Water Master and the municipal water districts, host annual educational workshop on relevant water quality and stormwater issues for elected officials and staff. Required Resources: Staffing  Support of Water Policy Committee and TAC (100 hours)  Attend and report on IRWMP meetings (40 hours)  Provide support to County-wide funding task force (30 hours)  Host annual educational workshop (30 hours) 3
Long-Term Strategies                   Establish Water Policy Committee and TAC to guide policy development and provide te...
Water Water Conservation, Recycling & Recharge Background: Water conservation is critical in Southern California, as much of the region relies on water that is imported from other areas of the state. The San Gabriel Valley depends predominantly on local groundwater for its local water supply, mitigating the risks of droughts and imported water price spikes. However, water conservation is still essential for the region. Goals:    Complying with State conservation goals & regulations Reducing municipal costs through increased water conservation & reduced usage Reducing community-wide costs related to water usage by reducing usage Needs Assessment & Partnership Opportunities: MWDs WQA Groundwater Cleanup CPUC Regulation & Funding Wholesale Water Supply, Infrastructure, Planning & Education Potential Gaps:  Identifying & coordinating water conservation projects  Supporting regional public education & messaging regarding mechanisms to reduce water usage IRWMP Planning, Coordination & Funding LACSD & Local Agencies California Dept. of Water Resources Planning & Management Recycled water projects Local Water Retailers Water Supply CWH Education & Project Identification 4
Water Water Conservation, Recycling   Recharge Background  Water conservation is critical in Southern California, as much ...
Long-Term Strategies:     Establish Water Policy Committee and TAC to guide policy development and provide technical input to the Governing Board Serve as a clearinghouse to provide regional coordination for cities and agencies related to water projects Support regional public education and messaging regarding mechanisms to reduce water usage Assist cities in reducing their water usage and related energy usage Recommended Near-Term Actions: 1. Convene Water Policy Committee and TAC to provide technical analysis and recommendations to the Governing Board related to water conservation. 2. Attend Upper San Gabriel River and Rio Hondo River IRWMP Steering Committee meetings and prepare report to Water Policy on activities and potential roles for the COG. 3. Collect information on existing water conservation messaging campaigns, prepare summary report, and identify potential opportunities for COG to support these efforts. 4. Research potential funding source to expand LA County EEMIS to include water usage and costs and present report to Water Policy Committee. 5. Prepare analysis of sources of water (imported vs. groundwater) and service territories for various public and private water providers in the San Gabriel Valley. Required Resources: Staffing  Support of Water Policy Committee and TAC (100 hours)  Attend and report on IRWMP meetings (40 hours)  Collect information on existing water conservation message campaigns and prepare summary report (20 hours)  Research potential funding sources for water-related EEMIS expansion and prepare summary report (15 hours)  Prepare summary analysis of sources of water and water provider service territories (10 hours) 5
Long-Term Strategies                   Establish Water Policy Committee and TAC to guide policy development and provide te...
Water Water Reliability Background: A safe, reliable water supply is critical for the vitality of the San Gabriel Valley. To ensure reliability, it is important to diversify water sources, so that the region does not depend on just one water source. Goals:    Ensuring access to diversified water sources to prevent disruption in water access Identifying water reliability projects Obtaining funding to complete water reliability projects Needs Assessment & Partnership Opportunities: MWDs WQA Groundwater Cleanup CPUC Regulation & Funding Wholesale Water Supply, Infrastructure, Planning & Education Potential Gaps:  Identifying & coordinating water reliability projects  Supporting regional public education & messaging regarding mechanisms to reduce dependence on imported water IRWMP Planning, Coordination & Funding LACSD & Local Agencies California Dept. of Water Resources Planning & Management Recycled water projects Local Water Retailers Water Supply CWH Education & Project Identification 6
Water Water Reliability Background  A safe, reliable water supply is critical for the vitality of the San Gabriel Valley. ...
Long-Term Strategies:     Establish Water Policy Committee and TAC to guide policy development and provide technical input to the Governing Board Serve as a clearinghouse to provide regional coordination for cities and agencies related to water projects Support regional public education and messaging regarding mechanisms to reduce water usage Assist cities in reducing their water usage and related energy usage Recommended Near-Term Actions: 1. Convene Water Policy Committee and TAC to provide technical analysis and recommendations to the Governing Board related to water reliability. 2. Attend Upper San Gabriel River and Rio Hondo River IRWMP Steering Committee meetings and prepare report to Water Policy on activities and potential roles for the COG. 3. Collect information on existing water conservation messaging campaigns, prepare summary report, and identify potential opportunities for COG to support these efforts. 4. Research potential funding source to expand LA County EEMIS to include water usage and costs and present report to Water Policy Committee. 5. Prepare analysis of sources of water (imported vs. groundwater) and service territories for various public and private water providers in the San Gabriel Valley. Required Resources: Staffing  Support of Water Policy Committee and TAC (100 hours)  Attend and report on IRWMP meetings (40 hours)  Collect information on existing water conservation message campaigns and prepare summary report (20 hours)  Research potential funding sources for water-related EEMIS expansion and prepare summary report (15 hours)  Prepare summary analysis of sources of water and water provider service territories (10 hours) 7
Long-Term Strategies                   Establish Water Policy Committee and TAC to guide policy development and provide te...
Water Wastewater Background: Water collection, conveyance, and treatment are important regional issues. There are many State and Federal policies and regulations that must be met to ensure that wastewater is properly collected, maintained in local sewer systems before conveyance to regional treatment facilities, and treated prior to distribution as recycled water or discharged to the rivers and ocean. Goals:     Meeting wastewater requirements with limited technical & funding resources Educating the public and elected officials on wastewater requirements and challenges Identifying & securing long-term funding sources for waste projects and infrastructure. Improving wastewater treatment infrastructure. Needs Assessment & Partnership Opportunities: SWRCB/LARWQCB Regulation LACSD Wastewater Treatment & Programs Potential Gaps:  Educating local elected officials & the public  Coordinating efforts to secure funding US EPA Regulation CWEA & Local Agencies Educational Efforts 8
Water Wastewater Background  Water collection, conveyance, and treatment are important regional issues. There are many Sta...
Long-Term Strategies:    Establish Water Policy Committee and TAC to guide policy development and provide technical input to the Governing Board Identify need for and coordinate efforts to identify long-term funding sources for wastewater treatment and infrastructure Host informational events for San Gabriel Valley elected officials and the public to help them have a better understanding of wastewater treatment Recommended Near-Term Actions: 1. Convene Water Policy Committee and TAC to provide technical analysis and recommendations to the Governing Board related to wastewater collection, conveyance, and treatment. 2. Collect information on current funding obstacles or regulatory issues to identify commonalities and address those most critical. Required Resources: Staffing  Support of Water Policy Committee and TAC (100 hours)  Collect information on current funding obstacles or regulatory issues to identify commonalities and address those most critical (10 hours) 9
Long-Term Strategies               Establish Water Policy Committee and TAC to guide policy development and provide techni...
Water Near-term Actions & Resource Requirements Summary Staffing Issue Area Near-Term Action General Convene Water Policy Committee and TAC to provide policy technical input, analysis and recommendations to the Governing Board related to water issues. (3) 40 hours Water Quality / Support County-wide funding task force. NPDES Host annual educational workshop on relevant water quality and stormwater issues for elected officials and staff. Funding 100 hours Attend Upper San Gabriel River and Rio Hondo River IRWMP Steering Committee Meetings and prepare report to Water Policy Committee on activities and potential roles for COG. Technical Assistance 30 hours Water Conservation 30 hours Collect information on existing water conservation messaging campaigns, prepare report, and identify potential opportunities for COG to support these efforts. 20 hours Research potential funding source to expand LA County EEMIS to include water usage and costs and present report to Water Policy Committee. 15 hours Prepare summary analysis of sources of water and water provider service territories. 10 hours Water Reliability Present information regarding status of Bay Delta Conservation Plan and potential State bond measure and provide recommendations regarding adopting a position. 15 hours Wastewater Collect information on current funding obstacles and regulatory issues. 10 hours Total Required Additional Resources 270 hours (3) The SGVCOG currently has a Water Working Group that reports to the EENR Committee. This recommended action would replace the Water Working Group with a separate Water Policy Committee 10 that reports directly to the Governing Board.
Water Near-term Actions   Resource Requirements Summary  Staffing  Issue Area  Near-Term Action  General  Convene Water Po...
Organizations Involved with the San Gabriel River Watershed Federal Government Army Corps of Engineers Flood risk management; flood control http://www.spl.usace.army.mil/ Environmental Protection Agency Protect and restore water resources http://www.epa.gov/ US Fish and Widlife Service Conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats http://www.fws.gov/ US Forest Service Sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the Nation's forests http://www.fs.fed.us/ and grasslands US Bureau of Reclamation Manage, develop, prtect water and related resources in an environmentally manner http://www.usbr.gov/ State of California Department of Water Resources Improve and sustain California's water resources, imported water supply, CA Aqueduct, flood management and water use efficiency http://www.water.ca.gov/ State Water Resources Control Board Preserve, enhance and restore the quality of CA's water resources and ensure their roper allocation and efficient use for the future http://www.swrcb.ca.gov/ LA Regional Water Quality Control Board Preserve and enhance water quality in the Los Angeles region http://www.swrcb.ca.gov/losangeles/ State Resources Agency San Gabriel River, Rivers and Mountains Conservancy http://resources.ca.gov/ Department of Public Works/Flood Control District Water conservation, flood control and stormwater capture http://dpw.lacounty.gov/ LA County Sanitation Districts Wastewater treatment and recycled water http://www.lacsd.org/ Main San Gabriel Basin Watermaster Manage and protect groundwater resources within the Main San Gabriel Groundwater Basin www.watermaster.org/ Upper District Increase local water supply reliability, recycled water and water use efficiency San Gabriel Basin Water Quality Authority Coordnate and accelerate groundwater cleanup programs in the San http://www.wqa.com/ Gabriel Basin San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District Increase local water supply reliability and cost-effectiveness, water quality and water use efficiency http://www.sgvmwd.org Three Valleys Municipal Water District Supplment and enhance local water supplies www.threevalleys.com Metropolitan Water District of Southern California Provide adequate and reliable supplies of high quality water to its service area http://www.mwdh2o.com/ County of Los Angeles Special Districts www.upperdistrict.org
Organizations Involved with the San Gabriel River Watershed Federal Government Army Corps of Engineers  Flood risk managem...
San Gabriel Valley Council of Governments Non-governmental/Nonprofit organizations An umbrella agency of 31 cities working on regional issues, to secure http://www.sgvcog.org/ government funding, and to help forge a consensus in addressing municipal issues. The SGVCOG formed the Water Resources Working group to address regional water issues and concerns. In addition to the above government organizations, a variety of quasiand non-governmental organizations such as the Council for Watershed Health, Amigos De Los Rios, San Gabriel and Lower Los Angeles Rivers and Mountains Conservancy, San Gabriel Mountains Regional Conservancy, Watershed Conservation Authority, and Sierra Club provide valuable input toward the effective management of the Watershed.
San Gabriel Valley Council of Governments  Non-governmental Nonprofit organizations  An umbrella agency of 31 cities worki...
HOOD me nto Shasta Lake EUREKA Whiskeytown Reservoir REDDING Antelope Lake Sacram RED BLUFF ento Frenchman Lake Feath er -Colusa Canal Rive r Te h a m a Crystal Springs Reservoir n lum a s r ave Cal STOCKTON ke Mo Riv er TRACY S PALO ALTO Folsom So.CanaL SCALE OF MILES 0 4 8 12 SAN JOSE lau Riv s er duct Aque Hetchy Lake Del Valle Camanche Reservoir Pardee Reservoir New Hogan Lake e Mono mnct Calaveras River elu u Lake ok uedStanislaus M Aq Hetch New Melones River Reservoir Hetchy Contra STOCKTON Reservoir Del Costa y Aqued uctNew Don ta Canal Hetch Lake Hetchlumne v e r Pedro Res. Crowley Ri Tuo Lake R iv e r Lake McClure Del Valle South Bay ed M e r c MERCED Aqueduct San Madera Millerton Lake Santa Clara Canal Canal Pine Flat Canal Hollister Reservoir R iv e r San Luis Conduit Reservoir FRESNO is tan R iv e r MODESTO iv e r mne R Tu o lu r Rive quin Joa nal San ta Ca ndo -Me educt lta Aqu ia rn lifo Lake Tahoe Folsom Lake LODI uct ued q eA De American River Camanche Reservoir n e R i v er Ca Rive r SANTA ROSA SACRAMENTO ay th B Nor educt Aqu San Luis Reservoir Ow en SAN FRANCISCO Lake Davis Lake Oroville anal Clair Engle Lake FAIRFIELD Aqueduct Bay th er Nor Suisun Riv Marsh VALLEJO ra Joaquin Sac San Pablo PITTSBURG San Bay CONCORD ANTIOCH Contra SAN Costa RAFAEL Canal Clifton Court BERKELEY Forebay WALNUT Los Vaqueros CREEK Reservoir Site OAKLAND Banks Pumping Plant SAN FRANCISCO Tracy Pumping Plant San South Francisco Bay Aqueduct Bay Hetch nes Delta Cross Channel M lu m oke NAPA Napa-Petaluma Tidal Marsh Sacramento 15 miles North C osum Sacramento Ship Channel S o u th C CRESCENT CITY s R iv e r Mendota Joa ant Fri quin LOS ANGELES AQUEDUCT r i ve Cross Valley Canal Canal Coastal Branch Kern K i n g s R iv e r nR Ker Isabella Reservoir BAKERSFIELD SAN LUIS OBISPO CALIFORNIA AQUEDUCT Lake Cachuma SAN DIEGO Diamond Valley Lake Lake Skinner San Diego Aqueducts Coa Salton Sea West Side San Vicente Main Canal Reservoir Lower Otay Reservoir che lla Ea st R iv e r LEGEND FEDERAL AQUEDUCT STATE AQUEDUCT LOCAL AQUEDUCT RIVERSIDE LOS ANGELES Lake Mathews SANTA ANA Silverwood Lake Lake Perris l na C a i n eCa na l hl Hig MAJOR WATER CONVEYANCE FACILITIES IN CALIFORNIA SAN BERNARDINO Lake Havasu COLORADO RIVER AQUEDUCT Colorado Pyramid Lake SANTA Castaic BARBARA Lake VENTURA All American Canal N THE METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 8/12 15M
HOOD  me nto  Shasta Lake  EUREKA Whiskeytown Reservoir  REDDING Antelope Lake  Sacram  RED BLUFF  ento  Frenchman Lake  F...
Central Valley Project Its construction authorized by the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1937, the massive Central Valley Project (CVP) encompasses 20 reservoirs with a combined storage capacity of 11 million acre-feet, eight power plants, two pumping-generating plants and some 500 miles of major canals and aqueducts. In a normal year, the CVP delivers 7 million acre-feet of water to about 3 million acres of farmland in the Central Valley. Urban areas also get water from the CVP; the Contra Costa Canal provides water to cities in Contra Costa County while the Santa Clara Valley Water District provides CVP water to several million urban customers. State Water Project In 1960, California voters approved financing for construction of the initial features of the State Water Project (SWP). The project includes some 22 dams and reservoirs, a Delta pumping plant, a 444-mile-long aqueduct that carries water from the Delta through the San Joaquin Valley to southern California. The project begins at Oroville Dam on the Feather River and ends at Lake Perris near Riverside. At the Tehachapi Mountains, giant pumps lift the water from the California Aqueduct some 2,000 feet over the mountains and into southern California. The SWP provides irrigation water to farms in the San Joaquin Valley, and is a major source of supply for cities in Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, and other parts of southern California. In addition, the SWP serves cities in Napa and Solano counties through the North Bay Aqueduct, Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties through the Coastal Aqueduct and communities in Alameda and Santa Clara counties through the South Bay Aqueduct. The project is operated by the California Department of Water Resources. Colorado River The 1,440-mile-long Colorado River passes through parts of seven states, several Indian reservations and the Republic of Mexico. California is entitled to 4.4 million acre-feet of water annually from river. Most of that water irrigates crops in the Palo Verde, Imperial and Coachella valleys, located in the southeastern corner of the state, but the Colorado also is a vital source of water for urban southern California. Urban supplies are distributed by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California through its Colorado River Aqueduct. MWD is a water wholesale agency that supplies water to water districts that serve 18 million customers in Los Angeles, Orange, San Diego, Riverside, San Bernardino and Ventura counties. Other Major Water Systems A number of large population centers in California have developed their own extensive water projects. The Hetch Hetchy Project transports Tuolumne River water 156 miles from the Central Sierra to San Francisco and peninsula cities. The East Bay Municipal Utility District supplies cities on the east side of San Francisco Bay with Mokelumne River water. Aqueducts built by the City of Los Angeles draw water from the Owens River, Mono Lake Basin and reservoirs on the east slopes of the southern Sierra. In Los Angeles, a 223-mile aqueduct completed in 1913 has served as a major water supply source, conveying water from the Owens River in the eastern Sierra. A second aqueduct, completed in 1970, added another 50 percent capacity to the water system. The two aqueducts deliver an average of 430 million gallons a day to the city. Groundwater About 30 percent of California's total annual water supply comes from groundwater in normal years, and up to 60 percent in drought years. Local communities' usage may be different; many areas rely exclusively on groundwater while others use only surface water supplies. Contrary to popular opinion, groundwater does not exist in underground lakes. Groundwater fills pores (spaces) between sand, gravel, silt and clay in water-bearing formations known as aquifers. Local Streams & Reservoirs Many cities rely on local water projects for all or a portion of their supplies. These projects typically were built and are operated by local public water districts, county water departments, city water departments or other special districts. Nearly 600 special purpose local agencies in California provide water to their areas through local development projects and imported supplies. A number of local agencies may also operate flood control and wastewater treatment facilities in addition to providing drinking water. Local water agencies usually are formed by a vote of the community, operate as public organizations, are governed by elected directors and fund their projects through bond issues. In some communities, water is provided by private companies. Approximately 6 million Californians are served by these investor-owned utilities, which are regulated by the California Public Utilities Commission. The PUC monitors operations and service, sets water rates, and enforces water quality standards set by state and federal regulators.
Central Valley Project Its construction authorized by the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1937, the massive Central Valley Proje...
Central Valley Project Alhambra Arcadia Azusa Baldwin park Covina Diamond Bar Duarte El Monte Glendale Glendora La Canada/Flintridge La Puente La Verne Monrovia Montebello Monterey Park Norwalk Paramount Pasadena Pico Rivera Rosemead San Dimas San Gabriel San Marino Santa Fe Springs Sierra Madre South El Monte South Gate South Pasadena Temple City Walnut West Covina Whittier State Water Project Colorado Project Other Major Water Systems Groundwater Local Streams & Reservoirs
Central Valley Project  Alhambra  Arcadia Azusa Baldwin park Covina Diamond Bar Duarte El Monte Glendale Glendora La Canad...
EXPANDING LOCAL WATER SUPPLIES WITH STORMWATER
EXPANDING  LOCAL WATER SUPPLIES WITH  STORMWATER
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA NEEDS MORE LOCAL WATER SUPPLIES Here in Southern California, water for our homes, businesses and farming operations comes from many sources. Some close, some far away like the Colorado River and the SacramentoSan Joaquin River Delta. In fact, approximately 1/2 of our region’s water comes from imported sources. However, those imported water supplies are increasingly unreliable and rising in cost. Climate change, aging infrastructure and impacted habitats are further reducing the reliability of these major delivery systems. We need to invest in statewide actions to improve reliability of our imported water supplies. Concurrently, we need to develop more local water supply options here in Southern California. We’ve made significant progress thus far with conservation. During the past 20 years, Southern 101 California’s water use has remained essentially the same, despite adding approximately three million people to its population. In the coming years, Southern California water agencies will meet the demands of population growth through additional conservation efforts and new local supply projects, such as recycling and stormwater capture. STORMWATER Billions of gallons of freshwater are lost every year because we don’t yet have enough stormwater capture systems in place. STORMWATER IS AN UNDERUTILIZED RESOURCE It’s a basic idea: When it rains, we need to be able to capture that water, store it and then use it later. Today, about half the water from rain that could be used to replenish groundwater basins and increase local water supplies ends up turning into polluted stormwater runoff. In highly developed urban areas, the water simply has nowhere to go. Unable to infiltrate through hard pavement, the stormwater flows down our streets and rushes through concrete canals, picking up all kinds of debris and chemicals along the way, ultimately polluting Southern California’s streams, rivers and ocean. And, it’s not just a coastal clean beach or water quality issue. Six Southern California counties would benefit from better stormwater management Ventura, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego. IN THIS DRY CLIMATE, WE NEED TO MAKE THE MOST OF OUR EXISTING WATER SOURCES AND USE THEM AS EFFICIENTLY AS POSSIBLE. Those inland counties also experience high storm flows through their rivers, often creating significant flooding, mudslides and hazards as the water pulses towards the ocean. Residents are doing their part to promote sustainability, installing rain barrels and roof capture systems, replacing concrete and asphalt with more porous materials and paving stones, and implementing stormwater “friendly” landscape designs and rain gardens. Local governments are building neighborhood park and rainwater harvesting projects that are helping prevent flooding and pollution. And, water agencies, cities and counties are collaborating on large-scale infrastructure projects that capture large quantities of stormwater to replenish our groundwater basins and surface reservoirs.
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA  NEEDS MORE LOCAL WATER SUPPLIES Here in Southern California, water for our homes, businesses and farm...
CAPTURING MORE STORMWATER: A SMART AND SENSIBLE SOLUTION It’s a common sense solution. Capture stormwater when flows run high - reuse it in your garden, reroute it to prevent neighborhood flooding, bank it in a surface reservoir or infiltrate it into a groundwater basin and save it for a future dry day. Capturing stormwater is viable, cost-effective and environmentally responsible. In addition to promoting sustainability, capturing stormwater is an important tool that statewide water managers are eager to implement given the clear benefits. Approximately 500,000 acre-feet of stormwater is currently captured and recharged into Southern California groundwater basins in an average year. That’s enough water to supply three million people for a year, or satisfy the water supply needs of San Diego, Anaheim, Riverside, Santa Ana and Long Beach combined. And, we can do even more. Capturing stormwater gives public water agencies access to additional, local water supplies that will help meet the demands of a growing population and provide emergency local supplies to help offset future droughts or disruptions of our imported supplies. Create more local water supplies By implementing additional stormwater projects in the Southland, we could potentially double the amount of stormwater captured in an average year, significantly enhancing local supplies and reducing reliance on imported sources. Reduce polluted runoff Each year, an average of 30 billion gallons of stormwater and urban runoff move through Los Angeles County’s storm drains and river systems. This runoff flows over urban surfaces and picks up garbage, bacteria and other contaminants. Capturing stormwater can help prevent this polluted water from moving through our rivers, streams and ultimately to our beaches and ocean. Provide a cost-effective water supply option Stormwater capture is a cost-effective new supply for Southern California’s water supply portfolio. Adding another source that can help improve the reliability of supply and stability of water costs. MORE STORMWATER MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS WILL ALLOW US TO RECHARGE GROUNDWATER BASINS, PROVIDING VITAL LOCAL WATER SUPPLIES FOR HOMES AND BUSINESSES ACROSS SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA.
CAPTURING MORE STORMWATER  A SMART AND SENSIBLE SOLUTION It   s a common sense solution. Capture stormwater when flows run...
MOVING THE NEEDLE The development of regional, consensus-based strategies for effective stormwater management is a priority for the Southern California Water Committee and the California Water Foundation—we’ve seen some early successes, but there’s more to do. Expanding on existing information, collaborating with public and private organizations across the region and investing in projects that have proven to be feasible and efficient are all sensible goals. Moving the needle on local water supplies though will take foresight, collaboration and commitment from our local, regional and statewide leaders. As we work to identify stormwater management projects and potential funding opportunities, we encourage you to learn more and become part of the solution. SUCCESSFUL PROJECTS ALREADY IN PLACE Public water agencies, flood control districts, cities and counties throughout Southern California have been successfully constructing stormwater projects that reduce pollution, prevent flooding, recharge groundwater basins and help fill surface reservoirs. From turning traditional blacktop parking lots into porous asphalt that will usher water into underground storage, to transforming an old landfill into a public park that doubles as a stormwater infiltration system, local governments and communities are creating innovative stormwater capture projects that help increase water supplies, reduce flooding and clean up our waterways. INDIVIDUAL NEIGHBORHOOD LARGE-SCALE RAIN GARDEN SUN VALLEY PARK PROJECT PRADO DAM • A rain garden allows 30% more water to seep into the ground than a conventional lawn • Reduced neighborhood flooding by capturing stormwater for groundwater recharge • The native plants used in rain gardens require less water and less fertilizer than conventional lawns • Water percolates into aquifers underneath playing fields • Storing stormwater behind the dam in Riverside County for percolation into the Santa Ana River • Sun Valley Park in Los Angeles County can capture enough water for 60 families for one year • Increasing water supply reliability for residents and businesses PUMP UP THE VOLUME is a public education program developed by the Southern California Water Committee and sponsored by the California Water Foundation. PHOTO CREDITS: Rain barrel and Sun Valley Park courtesy of TreePeople; rain garden courtesy of GardenSoft; Prado Dam courtesy of Patrick Huber FOR MORE INFORMATION, please visit www.socalwater.org and www.californiawaterfoundation.org.
MOVING THE NEEDLE The development of regional, consensus-based strategies for effective stormwater management is a priorit...
BDCP Bay Delta Conservation Plan Fast Facts October 2013 The BDCP is... ...a long-term strategy to secure California’s water supplies and improve the ecosystem of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The BDCP Co-Equal Goals WATER SUPPLY RELIABILITY 3 INTAKES 2 GRAVITY FLOW TUNNELS 30 MILES IN LENGTH The BDCP Would Benefit Millions of Californians The BDCP is one part of California’s overall water portfolio. It aims to protect our unique Delta ecosystem and secure water supplies for a vast part of the California economy. SECURING WATER SUPPLIES 4.7-5.6 SacramentoSan Joaquin River Delta MILLION ACRE-FEET ON AVERAGE ANNUALLY (An acre-foot is roughly as much water as two California households use, indoors and outdoors, in a year) Proposed Intakes CREATING & PROTECTING JOBS 9,000 CFS* CAPACITY *Cubic Feet per Second $ ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT JOBS CREATED AND SAVED FOR CALIFORNIA (Based on a year by year estimate) 150,000 Proposed Tunnel Alignment ACRES OF RESTORED AND PROTECTED HABITAT 56 1.1 MILLION BOOSTING THE ECONOMY $ PROTECTED SPECIES IMPROVED FLOW CONDITIONS TO BENEFIT FISH IN THE DELTA $84 BILLION INCREASE IN STATE ECONOMIC PRODUCTIVITY The BDCP is Important for California WATER SUPPLY RELIABILITY 25 ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION CLIMATE RISK ADAPTATION MILLION PEOPLE MORE THAN 3 MILLION from the Bay Area to San Diego rely on water from the Delta ACRES OF FARMLAND rely on water from the Delta DELTA FISH AND WILDLIFE depend upon a healthy Delta ecosystem LEVEE FAILURES RISING SEA EARTHQUAKES LEVELS NATURAL RISKS AND CLIMATE CHANGE threaten the reliability of the existing system
BDCP  Bay Delta Conservation Plan  Fast Facts  October 2013  The BDCP is...  ...a long-term strategy to secure California ...
BDCP Cost and Funding... The BDCP is Guided by the Best Available Science ...implemented over a 50-year period. $16 BILLION $4.4 BILLION TOTAL tunnel construction paid for by PUBLIC WATER AGENCIES ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM to implement and monitor BDCP biological goals and objectives habitat restoration paid for with STATE/FEDERAL FUNDING1 AND BY PUBLIC WATER AGENCIES $24.7 BILLION WATER OPERATIONS by the Department of Water Resources and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation $1.7 BILLION $2.6 BILLION for program oversight2 paid for by PUBLIC WATER AGENCIES AND STATE/FEDERAL FUNDING to address other stressors paid for by PUBLIC WATER AGENCIES AND STATE/FEDERAL FUNDING OVERSIGHT by state and federal fish and wildlfe agencies T  he availability of federal funds will be contingent on future federal appropriations. 1 P  rogram oversight includes monitoring and research, management/administration, changed circumstances, and property tax revenue replacement. 2 The BDCP Would Benefit the Delta Ecosystem DELTA RESTORATION BDCP would contribute to the conservation of 56 species of fish, plants and wildlife in the Delta. 45 52% through protection and enhancements in the quantity and quality of habitat in the Delta. in the Delta SPECIES OF PLANTS & WILDLIFE CONSERVED INCREASE IN PROTECTED LAND 11 FISH SPECIES BENEFIT, from an increase in the amount and quality of habitat, food sources, and ecological function of Delta flows. Species include Chinook salmon and delta smelt. 10 OTHER STRESSOR REDUCTION MEASURES would reduce adverse effects, such as invasive species, predation, and contaminants, to improve the ecological function of the Delta. For more information, or to submit comments, visit www.BayDeltaConservationPlan.com, call 1-866-924-9955, or email info@BayDeltaConservationPlan.com.
BDCP Cost and Funding...  The BDCP is Guided by the Best Available Science  ...implemented over a 50-year period.   16 BIL...
BDCP BDCP Draft Environmental Impact Report/ Environmental Impact Statement (EIR/EIS) Bay Delta Conservation Plan Fast Facts February 2014 The BDCP Draft EIR/EIS is... An analysis of BDCP and its alternatives’ negative and beneficial impacts on the human environment, and actions to avoid or minimize negative impacts, with the goal of improving the Delta ecosystem and ensuring reliable water supplies for 25 million Californians. Environmental Analysis Objectives DEVELOP REASONABLE ALTERNATIVES to meet the purpose and need and avoid or minimize impacts ANALYZE Environmental impacts DEVELOP MITIGATION MEASURES to reduce or avoid impacts þ PREPARE INFORMATION EVALUATE DISCLOSE project impacts, mitigation, and for public and public comments stakeholder review to decision-makers and comment Economic impacts Robust, Science Driven Screening Process Alternatives evaluated in the Draft EIR/EIS must: 1 Be feasible and reasonable 2 Meet project objectives 3 Avoid or substantially FIRST SCREENING LEVEL Identify Alternatives reduce significant impacts The BDCP Draft EIR/EIS Analyzes more than 600 resource area impact categories. Of these resource impact categories, 65-79 environmental impacts were deemed beneficial, depending upon the alternative evaluated. 57-60 resource areas were found to have no impact, and up to 431 resource area impacts were deemed less than significant. The Draft EIR/EIS determined 54-72 significant and unavoidable impacts (as determined by the California Environmental Quality Act), depending upon alternative, that may be reduced with the implementation of additional mitigation measures. SECOND SCREENING LEVEL Avoid or lessen environmental impacts and address significant issues THIRD SCREENING LEVEL Define potentially feasible and reasonable alternatives SCREENING FOR CONSISTENCY Identification of with the 2009 Delta Reform Act, scoping comments, and existing water rights of non-BDCP participants 15 1 ACTION ALTERNATIVES and NO-ACTION ALTERNATIVE/ EXISTING CONDITIONS BDCP Environmental Benefits and Impacts Increased recreational opportunities in the Delta Increased resilience to climate change Water supply reliability Short-term construction effects on air quality, transportation, noise, and other resources Temporary and permanent conversion of farmland for habitat restoration and water conveyance facilities Reduced stressors on the Delta ecosystem, such as control of invasive aquatic plants Effects on water quality from conveyance facility operations and maintenance Approximately 150,000 acres of habitat restoration Improved flows for threatened/ endangered fish species The full list of environmental impacts can be found in the Executive Summary of the Draft EIR/EIS Increased jobs and revenue generated by construction Reduced reliance on south Delta diversions
BDCP  BDCP Draft Environmental Impact Report  Environmental Impact Statement  EIR EIS   Bay Delta Conservation Plan  Fast ...
15 Draft EIR/EIS Action Alternatives: The Draft EIR/EIS alternatives represent a combination of water conveyance configurations, capacities and operational criteria, habitat restoration and conservation targets, stressor reduction measures, and various avoidance and minimization measures. Maximum Alternative Water Diversions Intakes 1A 15,000 cfs 15,000 cfs 1-3, 6, 7, or 1-5 3 PIPELINE/TUNNEL Action Alternative Examples 1-5 2A 4 5 6A 6,000 cfs 9,000 cfs 3,000 cfs ALTERNATIVE 4: 1&2 2, 3 &5 • Recently improved to reduce the footprint by nearly one-half of its original size 2 W4 3 W5 15,000 cfs 2, 3 &5 9,000 cfs 2, 3 &5 5 1-5 9,000 cfs 6 Delta Cross Channel Gates Georgiana Slough Nonphysical Barrier 7 ALTERNATIVE 1B: • Eastern Delta lined or unlined open canal • Five intakes between Clarskburg and Walnut Grove 15,000 cfs 1-5 2B 15,000 cfs 1-3, 6, 7, or 1-5 6B 15,000 cfs 1-5 1C 15,000 cfs West (W)1 2C 15,000 cfs W1-W5 • Screened intakes at Delta Cross Channel and Georgiana Slough 6C 15,000 cfs W1-W5 15,000 cfs Delta Cross Channel and Georgiana Slough channel modifications • Four basic corridors: -North Delta corridor -South Delta corridor -San Joaquin separate fish movement corridor -Mokelumne separate fish movement corridor 9 NO ACTION/ NO PROJECT isolated ALTERNATIVE 9: Intake Intake Line Modified Pipeline/Tunnel Option East Option West Option Forebay Current operations N/A Intakes 4 1B EAST CANAL 1 W3 1 8 WEST CANAL W1 W2 • CEQA (or state) Preferred Project 7 THROUGH DELTA The BDCP will include approximately 150,000 acres of restored and protected habitat for 56 covered species, and improve flow conditions to benefit fish in the Delta. Separate Corridor Option Fish Movement Corridor Water Supply Corridor NOTE: A full description of the 15 Action Alternatives, and the No Action Alternative, can be found in Chapter 3 (Alternatives) of the Draft EIR/EIS. For more information, or to submit comments, visit www.BayDeltaConservationPlan.com, call 1-866-924-9955, or email BDCP.Comments@NOAA.gov.
15 Draft EIR EIS Action Alternatives  The Draft EIR EIS alternatives represent a combination of water conveyance configura...
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA A L E A D E R I N WATER CONSERVATION Southern California has invested more than $12 billion in conservation and local supply projects since 1995 $12,000,000,000+ $1 Billion Conservation +$2.5 Billion $.75 Billion Recycling LEADERS IN WATER EFFICIENCY Conservation All Stars 75 114 121 143 150 163 166 Santa Ana Long Beach Huntington Beach Glendale San Diego Burbank Mojave Desert gallons used per day per person For more information, visit www.SoCalWater.org. $1.5 Billion Stormwater Groundwater Storage California residents on average use $5 Billion Surface Water Storage $2.5 Billion Groundwater Clean-up Los Angeles residents on average use 196 129 Gallons per day Southern California Population 1990 2010 16.5 19.5 MILLION MILLION Despite 3 million new residents, Total Water Use Has Stayed Flat! Gallons per day Los Angeles has one of the lowest per capita water use out of all US. cities with a population of more than 1 million
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA A L E A D E R I N WATER CONSERVATION Southern California has invested more than  12 billion in conserv...
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA WATER CONSERVATION 900,000 acre-feet conserved during past 20 years. TOILET REBATES That is enough water for 1.8 million families for an entire year. More water is recycled in California than any other state in the nation. 75% of recycled water SMART IRRIGATION CONTROLLERS is produced in Southern California. ~500,000 acre-feet of stormwater is currently captured and recharged into Southern California groundwater basins in an average year. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA HIGH EFFICIENCY APPLIANCES LEADING THE WAY Mojave Water Agency Removed 6 million square feet of turf WATER WISE LANDSCAPING Metropolitan Water District of So. Cal. Produced more than 1,679,000 acre-feet of recycled water since 1982 Desert Water Agency Recycles 100% of its wastewater Los Angeles Department of Water & Power RAIN BARRELS Reduced water use by 17% since implementing its outdoor water ordinance in 2009 San Diego County Water Authority Is building the largest seawater desalination facility in U.S. Orange County Water District Has the world’s largest recycling plant DRIP IRRIGATION Western Municipal Water District Coordinated distribution of more than 1 million high-efficiency sprinkler nozzles Santa Margarita Water District Captured and reused 12 billion gallons of urban runoff since 1979 SCWC supports Governor Brown’s drought emergency declaration and his call for increased conservation. February 2014 TURF REMOVAL WE CAN DO MORE For more information, please visit www.SoCalWater.org.
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA  WATER CONSERVATION  900,000 acre-feet conserved during past 20 years.  TOILET REBATES  That is enough...
What does a 20% Reduction in water use look like? Install aerators on bathroom faucets saves 1.2 gallons per person/day Turn off water when brushing teeth or shaving saves 10 gallons per person/day Fix leaky toilets saves 30-50 gallons per day/toilet Average Daily use The average Californian uses 196 gallons of water per day. Here are some easy ways to reduce water use. Find the right combination for you to reduce by 20% or 38 gallons a day. 196 gallons per day Wash only full loads of clothes saves 15-45 gallons per load Take five minute showers instead of 10 minute showers saves 12.5 gallons with a water efficient showerhead Install Efficient, Watersense-labeled shower heads saves 1.2 gallons Install a high-efficiency watersense-labeled toilet (1.28 gallon per flush) saves 19 gallons per person/day For more tips on reducing water use, visit saveourH2O.org! per minute OR 10 gallons per average 10-minute shower
What does a  20  Reduction in water use look like  Install aerators on bathroom faucets  saves  1.2 gallons  per person da...
California esta en sequía estatal Reduce Su Uso de Agua por 20% ¿Como parece una reduccion de 20% en el uso de agua? instala reguladores con restricción de paso en las llaves ahorra 1.2 galones al dia Típico Uso Diario Una persona típica usa 196 galones de agua cada dia. Aqui se ofrece unas ideas para reducir su uso por 20% al dia. 196 galones al dia Usa la lavadora de ropa solamente cuando esté llena ahorra 15-45 galones por lavada Cierre la llave al cepillarse los dientes Reduce tu tiempo en la ducha a cinco minutos 10 galones 12.5 galones ahorra al dia Usa la lavadora de platos automática solamente cuando esté llena ahorra 5-15 galones por lavada Para obtener más ideas, visita www.saveourH2O.org! ahorra al dia Llena la tina hasta la mitad para bañarte ahorra 12 galones por baño
California esta en sequ  a estatal Reduce Su Uso de Agua por 20     Como parece una reduccion de 20  en el uso de agua   i...
│ CALIFORNIA URBAN FORESTS COUNCIL │ INVEST FROM THE GROUND UP │ HELP YOUR TREES SURVIVE THE DROUGHT BE WATER-WISE. IT’S EASY. HERE’S HOW. YOUNG TREES The roots of younger trees are less established & need easier access to water to establish deep root systems. Trees and water are both precious resources. Trees make our houses feel like home–they also improve property values, clean our water & air, and even make our streets safer & quieter. When we water wisely and maintain our trees carefully, we enjoy a wide range of benefits at a low cost and with little effort. MATURE TREES Mature trees require MORE water when growing near heat traps such as driveways & foundations. THE RIGHT AMOUNT Water young trees twice per week (about 5 gallons) & mature trees once per week in several places (the equivalent of 1 to 1.5 inches of rain). IN THE RIGHT PLACE Water the “drip zone,” area directly beneath the foliage & shaded by the tree. Also, add mulch to lower soil temperatures & reduce water evaporation. THE RIGHT WAY During drought, water directly with a hose or 5-gallon bucket. THE RIGHT DEPTH Deep watering helps deep root growth & healthier trees. EXPOSED TREES Water loss is greater where trees are exposed to hot afternoon sun & strong or constant wind. CONSERVE & RECYCLE WATER Inside: Place buckets in the shower to collect warm up water. Recycle water from the dehumidifier, collect air conditioning condensation, & “save a flush” to conserve. Outside: Convert irrigation systems to drip, low-flow or micro spray & fix leaks. DECIDUOUS TREES The critical time for water is during later winter/early spring when new buds and leaves are forming. THE RIGHT TIME Water early in the morning or after the sun has set, as this is when trees replace the water they’ve lost during the day. Also less water is lost to evaporation at these times. Mulching your tree will also keep soils warmer in winter & cooler in summer. VISIT US: www.InvestFromTheGroundUp.org Facebook.com/InvestInTrees @InvestInTrees DON’T WASTE WATER Water should soak into the ground rather than running off into the drain. THE RIGHT CHOICE Plant native or drought resistant tree species that require less water. Choose trees over lawn, as trees are a long-term investment. SUBSCRIBE: For more tips to keep your trees healthy.
    CALIFORNIA URBAN FORESTS COUNCIL     INVEST FROM THE GROUND UP      HELP YOUR TREES SURVIVE THE DROUGHT BE WATER-WISE....
Residential & Commercial Rebate Programs Residential water use is the largest contributor to California’s urban water consumption accounting for more than 2.2 trillion gallons of water per year. On average, a single family home in the United States uses 171 gallons of water per person, per day. Over one-third of that water is used indoors for laundry, showers/baths, toilets, sinks, washing dishes, etc. About two-thirds or more of that total daily water use is used for irrigation outside of the house. High-efficiency appliances and devices can help you save water in a big way! To apply or find out more about residential rebates for retrofitting a variety of high water-use fixtures/equipment with water efficient devices visit the www.socalwatersmart.com Businesses account for 60% of all water use in Southern California. Southern California businesses may be eligible for rebates on a wide variety of water-saving technologies to help encourage water efficiency and conservation. Leaders in business and industry recognize that resource conservation also helps establish a positive public image in their community. Many commercial facilities have lowered their water and sewer bills and received cash rebates for installing water efficient devices. No matter what the size or type of your business or facility, your business can take advantage of the many water conserving devices and technology available through this program. How can these programs help your business? Increased water use efficiency may result in:      Lower water bills Reduced wastewater charges Lower energy costs Reduced cost for wastewater pretreatment Reduced costs for chemicals and water purification To apply or find out more about CII rebates for retrofitting a variety of high water-use fixtures/equipment with water efficient devices visit www.socalwatersmart.com
Residential   Commercial Rebate Programs Residential water use is the largest contributor to California   s urban water co...