FunCation Academy’s 4th Grade Lesson Plan Sampler
Thank you for trying our Lesson Plan Sampler! Here are a few
quick tips before you begin.
1. This Lesson Plan Sampler contains six (6) 4th grade lessons, Reading, Writing, Spelling, Math, Science, and
Social Studies.
2. Please read through the complete lesson before you begin teaching. (Some lessons require a little prep work
before you can teach).
3. Each lesson includes additional resources, such as an instructional/introduction video, worksheets, and
activities and/or games to enhance the lesson.
Disclaimer
FunCation Academy is not the original author of any lesson plans. We compiled and modified free online lesson
plans and free additional third-party resources to create homeschool friendly easy-to-use lesson plans. You do
not have to become a member to use our lesson plans, we share 3 lesson plans every month via our newsletter.
Subject
Title
Vocabulary: Structural Analysis
Lesson Objective
Vocabulary: Structural Analysis
Background Information for Teacher
Teacher words are in bold.
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
• “Word Parts,” Student Page 1
• “Working with Word Parts,” Student Page 2
• “Word Parts and Meaning,” Student Page 5
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
VOCABULARY SUPPORT
un- dis- -ful
1. Read the definition of each affix to the student and give sample words and sentences to build meaning.
un
- This prefix means “not.” If a camper is not afraid of the dark, he is unafraid.
dis
- This prefix means “not.” If a chef is not pleased with the taste of a dish, she is displeased with it.
-ful
This suffix means “full of” or “with a lot of.” If an insect bite causes a lot of pain, it is a painful bite.
2. Have the student create words by adding affixes to the base words tie, like, and fear. Ask s/he to check a dictionary to make sure
that the combinations they create are all real words. Then have the student write sentences using the words they make.
Sometimes when reading, you might come across a word that looks long and difficult. It can be tempting to pass right over
it. But it might be an important word. It might relate to an important idea.
To figure out what the word means, think of it as a puzzle. Many longer words have built-in clues. These clues are special
parts that have their own special meanings.
Give the student a copy of “Word Parts,” Student Page 1(Step 3)
. Direct the student’s attention to the word in the top box. This word
looks long and complicated. But we can break it down into parts. Doing so will help us figure out what the word means.
The first part of the word is un-. Have the student point to the box containing un-. Un- is a prefix meaning “not.” A prefix is
added to the beginning of a word to change its meaning. Have the student point to the box containing success. What is the
second part? (success) Success is the base word. What does success mean? (Possible response: victory) Have the student
write this word in the box under success. The last part of this word is -ful. A suffix is added to the end of a word. The suffix -ful
means “full of.” When we put the meaning of un- and the meaning of -ful together with the meaning of success, we have a
meaning for the entire word. Point to the boxes containing not, victory, and full of. What does the word unsuccessful mean? (not
full of victory) Have the student write the words not full of victory in the last box.
Let’s practice using word parts to figure out the meaning of some other unfamiliar words.
Distribute “Working with Word Parts,” Student Page 2. (Step 3)
Have the student read aloud the text next to each picture. Guide the student in identifying the words parts and meaning of each
underlined word.
Finally, have the student complete the box at the bottom of the page to tell about a time they worked out a disagreement. Have the
student draw a picture to illustrate their story.
Now practice using word parts on your own.
1. Give the student a copy of “Word Parts and Meaning,” Student Page 5. (Step 3)
2. Monitor the student’s progress and remind them to think about the meaning of each word part and what the parts mean when you
put them together. Have the student record the meaning that belongs in each blank box and space.
3. Close the lesson by writing disgraceful on the board. Have the student find information on Student Page 5 that can help them
decide the meaning of the word. Ask the student to define disgraceful. Affirm or provide corrective feedback.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets needed to complete the lesson
ANSWERS
Student Page 2
2. un happy Unhappy means “not happy.”
3. dis agree Disagree means “to not think the same way.”
4. cheer ful Cheerful means “full of a happy feeling.”
Answers will vary, but students should use disagreed in the first sentence and agreed in the second.
ANSWERS
Student Page 5
1. not + alike Dissimilar means “not alike.”
2. un + usual not + (common) Unusual means “not common.”
3. grace + ful (loveliness) + full of Graceful means “full of loveliness.”
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Worksheet
Answer Key
Student Pages 4
1. (a happy feeling) + full of Joyful means “full of a happy feeling.”
2. un + covered not + (under something) Uncovered means “not under something.”
3. dis + obey not + (to follow the rule) Disobey means “to not follow the rule.

Subject
Writing
Title
Writing a What-If Story
Lesson Objective
In this lesson, you will write a what-if story about predicting weather.
Background Information for Teacher
N/A
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Pencil
Paper
Weather Watchers. pdf

Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Before You Write
Use the Sequence Chart (Step 3)
to help you review the main events in “Weather Watchers.” Begin by thinking about what happened
first and what happened last. Then think about three main events that happened in between. Fill in the boxes to show the events in
the order in which they happened in the story.
Writing a Draft
Imagine this: What if Lucy’s dad had asked the students in Lucy’s class to make a guess about the weather before they had learned
about tools for studying the weather? Would they have used Kai’s grandmother’s toe and the animals on Cecilia’s farm? Would they
have found a way to learn about weather tools? Write a what-if story that answers this question. Tell the events in order.
Revising
Reread your draft, looking for places that need improvement.
Revise by: • making sure you tell your story from the “he/she” point of view. • adding dialogue between characters.
Elaborate by adding details that make the climax, or high point of your story, more exciting.
Editing
Dialogue needs special punctuation. “The fire fighters are exhausted,”said fire chief Bill Young. “Watch out for the falling limb!”
shouted Max. Place quotation marks before and after the person’s words. End the quotation with a comma or an end mark. This
mark should come before the quotation mark.
As you edit your draft: • find characters’ spoken words. • make sure they are enclosed in quotation marks and end with a comma or
other end mark.

Editing Checklist
Did you also remember to. . . correctly spell words with the Greek suffix -ist (such as meteorologist) and the Greek root meter (such
as barometer)? use the correct form of commonly confused words like its/it’s and there/their/they’re? use a dictionary or a spell-check
function to make sure you have spelled words correctly?
Revising Your Final Draft
Use the tips below to evaluate your own work. Put a checkmark after each question to make sure you completed each stage of the
process.
Did you complete the Sequence Chart?
Drafting
Did you write a what-if story about Lucy’s class finding out about the weather?
Revising
Did you: • make sure your story is told from a “he/she” point of view?
Add dialogue between characters?
Editing
Did you: • correctly punctuate dialogue?
Check your spelling with a dictionary or a spell-check function?
Use feedback from this chart to improve your story and prepare a final draft.
Publishing Your Final Draft
Put your story together and name your collection Weather or Not?, or come up with your own clever title.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets needed to complete the lesson
Extra Practice worksheet
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
When did it happen? (offline) worksheet

Subject
Spelling
Title
Spelling Words Correctly Using Prefixes
Lesson Objective
This strategy will focus on the prefix "re-" to help predict the meaning of words. The same strategy can be used to introduce other
common prefixes such as "dis-", "in-" and "im-".
Background Information for Teacher
N/A
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Paper
Pencil
Whiteboard & Markers
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
This is a mini-lesson.
Brainstorm activity
Remind the student that a prefix is a word part that comes at the beginning of a word.
Tell the student that you're going to name some words that begin with the prefix "re-". (Say the words and write them on the board).
Say the words:
reread
rerun
rewrite
redo
remake
or any words of your choice
Ask the student to generate "re-" words of their own by adding the prefix to action words (verb) and write these words on the board.
Silly words are acceptable.
1. Print the prefix "re-" on the board and say it aloud.
2. Tell the student that it means again or back.
3. Use the words that you wrote during brainstorming and underline the prefix "re-".
4. Identify the base words.
5. Point out that the word "rewrite" that it means write again.
6. Go back to the words that were written in the Brainstorming activity and a couple of the students words. Discuss the
meaning of each word (prefix and base).
7. *Some words will be non-examples, such as rest or ready.
8. This would be a good time to tell the student that the letters "r" and "e" in a word are not always a prefix.
9. Print the following sentence on the board, underlining the word remake:
10. My mom asked me to remake my bed.
Say, "I see the word "remake" begins with "re-", which can be a prefix that means again or back. If I take "re" away from remake, I
have the word make, which means to put something together."
Say "Now I'll try one of the prefix meanings in a sentence. Make again makes sense in this sentence. My mom wants me to make my
bed again."
Print the following sentence on the board underlining the word rest.
We worked so hard, we needed to rest.
Remind the student that the letters "r" and "e" together in a word are not always a prefix.
Example: If I take the "re" away in rest, they aren't left with a word. So "re" in rest is not a prefix.
Tell the student that they should always use context clues and what they know about prefixes to get the meaning of the word.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Spelling Word List for this week.
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Prefix game (online)

Subject
Math
Title
Equivalent Fraction Go Fish
Lesson Objective
Students will become more familiar and comfortable working with equivalent fractions by matching two equivalents.
Background Information for Teacher
N/A
Student Prior Knowledge
Students must understand the basic concept of fractions.
Materials:
Index Cards
Markers
Paper
Pencil
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
After watching the video in Step 1, give the student 6 index cards and have them write one fraction on each card. Have them mix the cards up, then
pull two cards and determine if they are equivalent fractions using any of the methods in the video. (Draw, compare, reduce)
If the student needs additional practice you can give them an additional 6 cards to add to the pile.
Once the student has demonstrated they understand equivalent fractions, they are ready to play Fraction, Go Fish!
Instructions for making the Fraction, Go Fish! cards:
1. On one side of an index card, write a fraction. Write an equivalent fraction on another index card. Continue writing pairs of
equivalent fractions.You will need about 30 cards.
You can decorate one side of the card and laminate them for durability, but neither of these steps is necessary.
2. Sit across from the student or a sibling who is also learning fractions or needs a refresher. You can have up to 4 players.
RULES:
Choose a dealer
Dealer deals 5 cards to each player and puts the rest in a scattered pile in the middle of the group. The student can put down any
matches they have.
The student to the dealer’s left asks the student of his/her choice: “Do you have a fraction equivalent to (for example) 1/2?” If that
student has a match, all group members need to check for accuracy! If not, the student “goes fishing.” Again, if a match is found, all
group members check for accuracy.
Continue play until the “pond” is depleted. The student with the most matches is the winner!
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets for extra practice w/ answer key
Worksheets for extra practice w/ answer key
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Fraction Memory Game (online)

Subject
Science
Title
A Recipe for Soil
Lesson Objective
Students make soil using local materials and compare plant growth in natural and student-made soil.
Background Information for Teacher
N/A
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Denim soil-making bag
Dead leaves and other plant material
Pebbles
Sand
Water
Hammer or mortar and pestle
2 small cups or flower pots
Fast growing seeds (radish, grass, lettuce)
Latex gloves or plastic sandwich bags for students to wear on hands
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Soil is the material that constitutes the outermost layer covering practically all of the Earth's land surface. Soil is made of air, water,
humus (decayed organic material) and rock particles. Soil is formed by the slow process of weathering (the breaking down of rock),
erosion (the moving and deposition of weathered rock material), and the combining of those rock particles with air, water and organic
material. It can take from 100 to 600 years or more for nature to make one inch of topsoil.
Review with the student the "recipe" for soil: 25% air, 25% water, 45% rock particles, 5% organic material.
Explain to the student that they are going to make soil by replicating natural processes. They will gather organic material, "weather
and erode" rock material, and mix it with air and water to grow a plant.
Ask the students to gather
1. dead leaves
2. small twigs
3. flower petals
4. other small plant material
5. pebbles
6. sand
More pebbles and sand than organics are needed because soils contain more rock parts than they do organics.
Place all materials in a small bag made of denim or other heavy material (or use mortar and pestle to grind materials). Pound mixture
with a hammer until the rocks are pulverized.
Remove from the bag, place in planting pot, and add water (the act of pouring the materials into the pot will add air to the mixture).
Repeat this process until you have enough soil to fill a small cup or flower pot 3/4 full.
Plant 10 seeds in their soil and 10 more seeds in a pot containing natural soil (not potting soil). Then observe and compare the
growth. This will take a week or more. Have the student note when the seeds begin coming up out of the ground. Have them
measure the seedlings as they grow. They should also record how many of the ten seeds came up on each of the pots.
Relate the components of soil to the growth of plants in soil. Remind the student of the following:
a.Water is necessary to carry nutrients into the roots and up the stem. It is also necessary for the plants to grow.
b.Air is necessary to allow the roots to "breathe". Also, air spaces in the soil allow a place for water to enter the soil.
c.Organic matter, plant and animal parts, help hold the water in the soil. They also provide nutrients.
d.Rocks and minerals provide nutrients to the plants and structural support to the roots.
Ask the student how they could provide mineral nutrients for plants to grow without soil. List their responses. Responses might
include: grow plants in wet towels, grow plants in wet gravel, grow plants in water.
At the end of the week, help the student write a lab report. Their lab report should contain:
a. A clear statement of the question they were trying to answer. (In this case, it was something like, "Will plants grow
better in the soil I made or in natural soil.)
b. A description of their materials and set up.
c. A record of the data they collected (when the plants came up, how many came up, how much they grew). The could
be recorded in a table or in graph form.
d. A conclusion that states what they learned from the experiment. Did it answer the question they asked? If so, what
was the answer?
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Activity Worksheet for in depth learning
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Soildoku (offline) worksheet

Submit your completed Soildoku and *earn $3 FunBucks!

 

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Subject
Social Studies
Title
The Pony Express
Lesson Objective
Students will learn about the Pony Express and develop mapping skills.
Background Information for Teacher
N/A
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Paper
Colored pencils
Pencils
rulers
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
How do you get home? Is it a well known or marked path? What would happen if they didn't know where they were going?
Explain to the student that the need for maps has been around for a long time. Explain that the first mail service was through the
Pony Express and how their path was marked.
Discuss the Pony Express video from Step 1.
Explain to the student that they will be making a large map that shows the route they travel from home to their favorite location.
These routes can be walking or car routes, whichever the student prefers.
Before the student begins their map, suggest that they bring a small notebook and a pencil with them on their next walk or bus trip
from home to their favorite location. Encourage them to jot down the names of important streets along the way and to add landmarks
such as parks, stores, and fire and police stations. Have the student keep in mind that their maps should be simple. Too much detail
might be confusing.
After completing the map, have the student mark the route from home to their favorite location with a colored line, add a compass
rose to show directions, and draw a map key that shows what any symbols mean.
Before turning in the mapl, have the student show it to a friend or relative and ask them to describe the route out loud. An example
might be "Go west when you leave your house. Walk a block past the park, etc." The students might find out at this step that they
may have to make some modifications.
For an added challenge: When the students map is complete, have the student create a couple more maps and then use their
individual maps along with a town or city map to create one large map that shows each route from home to different locations.
Remind the student to include a compass rose and a map key. Display the map on a bulletin board and use it to teach map skills.
The student will have more fun practicing this skill when they recognize places on the map.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheet for extra practice
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Plan your trip (online game)

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