Title
Earth & Moon Orbits
Lesson Objective
The student will be able to describe the movement of Earth and the moon and the apparent movement of other bodies through the
sky.
Background Information for Teacher
N/A
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Journals
Hole punch
Colored pencils
Scissors
Earth, Moon, Sun Orbits (Step 3)
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Write on the board or hold up a sign that says, “The Earth orbits the sun and the moon orbits the Earth.” Explain to the student that
this is what they will be learning about in this lesson.
Ask the student the following question: What are the characteristics of the earth and moon? Allow the student time to respond.
Discuss what they think the characteristics of the earth and moon are. Have them share and write them on the board(Ex: The Earth
and the Moon are spheres, they are heavenly bodies, both are in space, both rotate around something else etc.) Have the student
write the characteristics of the Earth and moon in their journals.
Ask the student the following question: How do the Earth and moon receive light? Allow the student time to respond.
Have the student discuss how they think the Earth and moon receive their light. Share their ideas.
Explain to the student that the Earth receives its light from the sun. The Earth rotates on its axis. It rotates one complete rotation in a
24 -hour period (1 day). The Earth also rotates around the sun. When the Earth rotates around the sun, it is called a revolution. It
takes the Earth 365 days (1 year) to complete one revolution around the sun.
Have student write these facts about the Earth in their journals.
Explain to the student that the moon receives its light from the sun. The moon reflects the sun’s light, like a mirror. The sun shines on
the moon, and its light reflects off the moon’s rocks and dust. The Earth’s moon makes one orbit around the Earth one time a month,
(every 28 days). The same side of the moon points toward Earth all the time. Have the student write these facts about the moon in
their journals.
Ask the student the following question: What causes day and night? Allow the student time to respond.
Have the student discuss what causes day and night. Have the student share their ideas.
Explain to the student that as the Earth spins, you can see how night and day change on the Earth. Draw a representation and have
the student explain it in their journals. Make sure that they understand these facts about day and night.
Ask the student the following question: How would your life be different without night and day? Allow the student time to
respond.
Have the student discuss how their lives would be different without night and day. Have the student write their ideas in their journals,
and then share how their lives would change.
Discuss how the student could draw a model of the Earth, moon, and sun in their journals.
Out of the three, which one is the largest? (Sun)
Out of the three, which one is the smallest? (Moon)
Draw a model on the board that shows the sun, earth, and moon. The moon rotates around the Earth and the Earth rotates around
the sun. Have the student draw the model in their journals and label the following: Sun, Earth, moon Rotation (spinning) Revolution
(orbit)
Have the student color and put together the the Earth, Moon, Sun Orbit activity in Step 3 as a representation of what they learned.
Ask the student to explain their model.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets needed to complete the lesson
Step 4: Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can
demonstrate understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Moon to Orbit the Earth Interactive Learning (online) activity