© A MAGAZINE FALL 2016 FOR KAATSKILL VOLUME 31 LIVING NUMBER 3
    A  MAGAZINE  FALL 2016  FOR  KAATSKILL  VOLUME 31  LIVING NUMBER 3
TOC FALL 2016 VOLUME 31 NUMBER 3 F E A T U R E S D E PA R T M E N T S 2 KAAT CHAT and AREA MAP 4 360 DEGREES and LETTERS 24 KAATSKILL KRITTERS IT’S JUST A CLICK AWAY by Nicholas Zacharczenko, D.D.S. 26 KAATSKILL HIKING ASHOKAN HIGH POINT: APART FROM THE REST. by Peter Senterman 32 KAATSKILL GEOLOGIST HANGING DELTAS & HUMMOCKY LANDSCAPES: Part Two by Robert and Johanna Titus 40 KAATSKILL TREES REMEMBERING GRAY BIRCH by Ryan Trapani 50 KAATSKILL LODGINGS RESOURCEFULNESS and a BIT of WHIMSY on an OLD SCHOHARIE FARM by Kaatskill Staff 56 KAATSKILL DINING INVENTIVE COOKING at the GREEN IGUANA BISTRO by Kaatskill Staff 16 CATCH THE GRAHAMSVILLE COMMUNITY SPIRIT by Lawrence C. Swayne, M.D. BOOKS IN REVIEW 48 CHANGING AMERICA THE CATSKILLS: IT’S HISTORY and HOW IT CHANGED AMERICA by Stephen M. Silverman and Raphael D. Silver reviewed by John Rowen 49 YONDER PADDLING PENULTIMATE PADDLES in the PISECO, INDIAN and CANADA LAKES REGION: SOUTHEAST ADIRONDACKS by Russell Dunn reviewed by John Rowen 44 CATSKILLS CALLING by Lillian Browne Member INTERNATIONAL REGIONAL MAGAZINE ASSOCIATION
TOC  FALL 2016 VOLUME 31 NUMBER 3  F E A T U R E S  D E PA R T M E N T S 2  KAAT CHAT and AREA MAP  4  360 DEGREES and LET...
Kaat Chat In keeping with the changing seasons and evolving trends in publishing, Kaatskill Life has donned a new color. We have changed from printed to digital with the hope of expanding our readership. We are, however, saddened to loose Marilyn Milow Francis who has been our very loyal and competent editor/copy editor and friend for more than twenty five years. Cathy Roloson, in the Kaatskill Life office, will be able to answer questions at, 607 - 746 - 2176 mornings only, or, e-mail at: info@kaatslife.com Nina Lawford-Juviler (Editor-in-chief, Managing Editor, Art and Photography Editor) EDITOR IN CHIEF & MANAGING EDITOR: Nina A.M. Lawford-Juviler FAX #: 607-746-3135 CONTRIBUTORS: Peter Senterman, Robert Titus, Johanna Titus, Russ Patton, Jr., Michael Kudish, Nicholas Zacharczenko, Brigette Zacharczenko, Justin Askins, John Rowen, Ryan Trapani, Larry Gambon, Lawrence C. Swayne, LaVerne Black, Francis X. Driscoll, Steve Hoare, Garan Santicola ART DIRECTOR/LAYOUT: Nina A.M. Lawford-Juviler with John Stys PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR: Nina A.M. Lawford-Juviler FOOD & LODGINGS EDITOR: CALENDAR OF EVENTS & WEB MASTER: Cathy Roloson FAX #: 607-746-3135 ADVERTISING: In house SUBSCRIPTIONS: Cathy Roloson BOOKKEEPER: Sherri Telian PUBLISHER: The Delaware County Times, Inc. Francis X. Driscoll web site: www.kaatslife.com e-mail: info@kaatslife.com APOLOGY: Please note: We unfortunately miss credited three images appearing in the Summer 2016 issue, article Searching for the Lost Settlement of Schoharykill by Carolyn Bennett. The three images appearing on pages 44 bottom and two images on page 45 are by Larry Gambon. Rt. 20 SCHO GREEN 8 42 DELAWARE 28 17 ULSTER 213 9 0 2 149 D E L AW A R E 97 52 17 R I VE R • CATSKILLS CALLING: DELHI, MARGARETVILLE AND ARKVILLE 23 23-A SULLIVAN 97 NY STATE THRUW AY (87) 10 23 30 9W 206 10 E Kaatskill Life, established in 1986, is published four times yearly by The Delaware County Times, Inc., Delhi, NY. Editorial and sales office located at 56 Main Street, Delhi, NY 13753; phone 607-746-2176, FAX 607-746-3135. Copyright 2016 by The Delaware County Time s , Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reprinted or reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. Kaatskill Life cannot be responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, drawings, photographs or transparencies. PLEASE ALLOW 2 TO 8 WEEKS for responses to submitted material. ISSN 1073-9076. 4 28 • RESOURCEFULNESS AND A BIT OF WHIMSY ON AN OLD SCHOHARIE FARM MIDDLEBURGH N H U D S O N R I VE R ➺ 23 30 HARIE 21 I-8 10 28 OTS EGO 8 145 I-8 23 • INVENTIVE COOKING AT THE GREEN IGUANA BISTRO MIDDLEBURGH Digital Subscriptions $20. To get your Kaatskill Life digital subscription: Visit www.kaatslife.com and click on button for subscriptions. You can pay with PayPal or you can send a check or money order to: Kaatskill Life, 56 Main Street, Delhi, NY 13753 Please be sure to include your name, address, phone number and email so we can process your order. Back issues of Kaatskill Life available at $10 each ppd. Write your name and full street address or call 607-746-2176. Allow 6-8 weeks for processing. • CATCH THE GRAHAMSVILLE COMMUNITY SPIRIT GRAHAMSVILLE • ASHOKAN HIGH POINT: APART FROM THE REST WEST SHOKAN • HANGING DELTAS & HUMMOCKY LANDSCAPES: PART TWO ELLENVILLE Locations are approximate. 2 Kaatskill Life reserves the right to accept or reject all submissions, advertising or editorial, and to edit manuscripts for length, clarity and style. We accept original manuscripts double-spaced and clean-typed without corrections or insertions. FAXES AND COLUMN FORMATS NOT ACCEPTED. front cover: Lawrence C. Swayne, M.D. inside front cover: Francis X. Driscoll inside back cover: Larry Gambon back cover: Francis X. Driscoll
Kaat Chat In keeping with the changing seasons and evolving trends in publishing, Kaatskill Life has donned a new color. W...
DEBRA BECHTOLD, VISIONS OF SCHOHARIE VALLEY Discover MITCH WOJNAROWICZ/BREW CENTRAL Savor TOM SMITH, SCHOHARIE, NY Explore CALEB JACOBUS PHOTOGRAPHY Schoharie County is rich in history and natural beauty and filled with new worlds to discover. Whether you’re looking for breathtaking fall foliage, thrilling historical reenactments, a casual dinner for two, or simply a peaceful spot to relax, you’ll find it right here in picture-perfect Schoharie County. Schoharie County Chamber of Commerce 143 Caverns Road, Howes Cave, NY 12092 1-800-41-VISIT • upstatevacations.com CALEB JACOBUS PHOTOGRAPHY
DEBRA BECHTOLD, VISIONS OF SCHOHARIE VALLEY  Discover MITCH WOJNAROWICZ BREW CENTRAL  Savor  TOM SMITH, SCHOHARIE, NY  Exp...
360 Degrees The fourth annual Hobart Book Village Festival of Women Writers was a two and a half day event, attracting over 100 Participants. Each of the six Village Bookstores on Main Street, the Hobart Community Center, and the United Methodist Church served as venues for the Festival’s many events. Twenty-two published women authors six first time and 16 returning were invited to present a range of literary activities in areas of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, memoir, screenwriting, journalism, blogging, social media, and electronic publishing on Sept. 9, 10, 11, in Hobart, N.Y., the Book Village of the Catskills. Three Public Readings, featuring three Writers each, were offered throughout the Festival. For the second year, the Festival offered Ù three six-hour µ  masterclass Workshops, dubbed “Intensives.” Fourteen two hour Workshops for writers at all levels Ù w e r e pr e s e nt e d , µi nÙ c l u d i ng “ C r a f t i n g  t h e S h o rµtÙ S to r y , ”  L a n g uµ Ù a g e in “ S h a k i n g  U p Poetry,” “The Essay Collection µ as Memoir,” “Blogs, Websites, Ù    µ Ù  a n d S o c i a l M e d i a , ” µÙ “ T he Sentence in Fiction,” “Literary     µ Relationships in Community,” Ù “The Artist’s  Legal and Creative µ  Ù   Writers   Estate,” “Beginning Biteµ Sized Workshop,” “The Truthful Lie Ù  Writing µ Historical    in Fiction.” “Flash Readings,” the popular threeminute offerings by the Festival’s Returning Writers, were held on Saturday afternoon, followed by an open Reception for all in Liberty Rock Books, the Village’s largest bookstore. ’ The Festival’s newest initiative, the Writers’ Esther Cohen reading from her new book of poems Breakfast with Allen Ginzberg at the opening reception for writers and donors at T.P.’s Cafe in Stamford, NY. Elda Stefani, Stephanie Nickolopoulas, E.J. Antonio DELAWARE COUNTY 2016 HOBART FESTIVAL OF WOMEN WRITERS 4
360 Degrees  The fourth annual Hobart Book Village Festival of Women Writers was a two and a half day event, attracting ov...
360 Degrees Writers sophfronia Scott, Cheryl Clarke, Mary Johnson Conversation on Memoir, was participated in by Festival alumnae, poets Bessy Reyna and Juliet P. Howard and fiction writer Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa, and moderated by WIOX Radio host, Simona David. Writers LaShonda K. Barnett, r. Erica Doyle, Yesenia Montilla, Kamilah A. Moon, Chinelo Okparanta, and    the  Festival   the  first  Elizabeth Searle were invited to for time. The returning writers included E. J. Antonio, Alexis De Veaux, Ginnah Howard, Linda Lowen, Dara Lurie, Stephanie Nikolopoulos, Elisabeth Nonas, Bessy Reyna, Bertha Rogers, and Sophfronia Scott.  All author readings and the Ù“Writers Conversation on Memoir”µwere free and  open  tothe public.  The Festival of Women Writers is made possible in part by generous funds from the New York State Council on the Arts Decentralized Grants administered by the   ArtsGroup in Delaware  County.    Roxbury The fifth annual Hobart Festival of Women Writers will be held on September 8, 9, 10, 2017.    John and Kim Whritner proprietors of the Sheep’s Nest provided lovely goody bags to festival writers. 5
360 Degrees  Writers sophfronia Scott, Cheryl Clarke, Mary Johnson Conversation on Memoir, was participated in by Festival...
360 Degrees JACK O’ LANTERN JAMBOREE Join family fun Annual Jack-O-Lantern Jamboree at Maple Shade Farm, Monday, October 24th! Delhi Fire Department & Greater Delhi Area Chamber host Annual Jack-O-Lantern Jamboree! Events include pumpkin-carving stations 12-4pm, children’s entertainment, jack-o-lantern contest, giant pumpkin display, Hayrides & Halloween Hill, Delhi FD -Fire Safety, Halloween Party & Dance with DJ Dracula, Costume Parade with Cash Prizes, Giveaways, Bonfire and food. Admission free.  Judging  5pm, Halloween  Party & Games  5pm, Schedule: Twilight Hayride 5pm, Costume Parade 6pm, DJ Dracula Dance Party 6-8pm, JACK O LANTERN lighting 7pm.  Gustafer Yellowgold his own productions of Gustafer Yellowgold’s Mellow ’ Sensation and Gustafer Yellowgold’s Infinity Sock. Gustafer the character is a friendly creature that came to Earth from the sun and is living out an explorer’s life in a slightly psychedelic version of the Minnesota woods. A native of Dayton, Ohio, award-winning and Grammy-nominated performer Morgan Taylor moved to New York City in 1999, honing his songwriting skills while concurrently becoming a successful sound engineer. A self-taught cartoonist raised on MAD Magazine and Marvel comics, Taylor began drawing what would  http://www.mapleshadefarmny.com/activities/jack-olantern-jamboree/Maple Shade Farm 2066 County Hwy 18 Delhi, New York (6070 746-8866. GUSTAFER YELLOWGOLD Since his creation by Morgan Taylor in 2005, Gustafer Yellowgold has become an international phenomenon, acclaimed by The New York Times which described Gustafer as “A cross between ‘Yellow Submarine’ and Dr. Seuss.” Entertainment Weekly praised “…The most infectious original songs. It’s like tapping into some pleasure center in the brain- both adult and kid…absurdly appealing.” Gustafer Yellowgold’s show is a multi-media performance of live music, colored-pencil animations and storytelling. With its unique crossover appeal, the show has been the wild-card opening act for Wilco and The  Ù  Spree.  Gustafer ± has appeared    in Polyphonic off-Broadway µ   Ùè    6       è  µ       
360 Degrees JACK O    LANTERN JAMBOREE Join family fun Annual Jack-O-Lantern Jamboree at Maple Shade Farm, Monday, October...
360 Degrees located on Main Street in the middle of the Village of Prattsville, which itself was settled as early as 1735 by the Dutch and German Palatines. The DeLibran’s are directly descended from Colonel George Watson Pratt, the only son of Congressman Zadock Pratt (1790–1871) and Abigail P. (Watson) Pratt (1807–1834) and himself a New York State Senator (10th D., 1858 and 1859) born in Prattsville, NY in 1833. In 1855, he married Anna Attwood Tibbits (1833–1921), and they had two children, George Seymour Pratt (185666) and Elizabeth Tibbits Pratt (1860-1926). George Seymour Pratt died in 1866 at the age of 10, leaving Elizabeth to carry on the family line. .Elizabeth was born in Albany New York, on January 27, 1860, the only daughter and surviving child of Col. George Watson Pratt and his wife, Anna Attwood Tibbitts. On April 21, 1881, French nobleman, Amédée Gasquet James of New Orleans, Louisiana.  Amédée, who had been born in New Orleans, descended from a very old French family that had sought refuge in the American South at the time of his birth, but eventually returned to France. It was Amadee’s mother, Louise who was related to the Gasquet family. The daughter of William Amédée Gasquet and Martha Jefferson Vaughan, the family was related to become the Gustafer Yellowgold videos as a picture book project in winter 2004. Morgan Taylor is married with two sons and now lives in the Hudson Valley. November 12, 2PM at Roxbury Arts Center 5025 Vega Mountain Road Roxbury NY GREENE C OUNTY THERE’S NOTHING LIKE THE PRESENT TO SHED LIGHT ON THE PAST. On Aug. 2, 2016, the Zadock Pratt Museum Board, staff and guests were honored by a visit from the Rolland DeLibran family, direct descendants of Zadock Pratt, through Zadock’s only son, Colonel George Watson Pratt and his wife, Anna Atwood Tibbits. Rolland, the greatgreat-great grandson of Zadock Pratt and his family traveled from France, London and California to meet up in the “Town that Pratt Built” for the express purpose of visiting the Pratt Homestead. This was the first time any of the DeLibran’s had been to the Homestead (a/k/a The Zadock Pratt Museum, ca. 1828) of their revered ancestor, a stunning example of Greek Revival architecture The entire Zadock Pratt clan, including Board of Directors, staff and supporters pose for a commemorative photo with the great-great-great grandson of Zadock Pratt and his beautiful family outside the Zadock Pratt Museum, which is also the original Pratt Homestead, ca 1828, listed on the National and State Registers of Historic Places. Notice the French flag on the left-hand column in the foreground, a gesture of respect and solidarity for the people of France. 7
360 Degrees located on Main Street in the middle of the Village of Prattsville, which itself was settled as early as 1735 ...
360 Degrees the House of Lapeyre, founders of the long-established New Orleans firm, Pike, Lapeyre & Co., Bankers.  Amédée was the son of Mr. A. B. James, but by birthright was a Count. Therefore, Amedee and Elizabeth soon became known as Count & Countess de Gasquet-James! After their marriage, the de Gasquet-James family spent most of their time in France and in other countries in Europe. However, as they always found a way to spend some time in America. In fact, their four children were born in the United States. Elizabeth and Amédée had three daughters and one son, Henri d’Abel de Libran, father of Rolland d’Abel de Libran, great-great-great grandson of Zadock Pratt, Jr. and great-great grandson of Colonel George Watson Pratt. Today, the DeLibran family is still making history. A profile of fashionista, Julie de Libran in a recent issue of “M” magazine describes her as one of the most watched women in Europe and heir to the mantle of recently deceased fashion icon, Sonia Rykiel. De Libran was appointed last year to steer the company that bears Rykiel’s name. A description of her that same issue of “M” magazine describes her perfectly. “She’s taller than Rykiel, with lavish, tousled blonde hair, and she, too, is hard to miss dressed in torn jeans, spike-heel boots, a black sweater, and carrying a black Birkin bag. Even before her current position was announced, de Libran, 42, who served for six years as Marc Jacobs’s right hand at Louis Vuitton, had emerged as a cult style icon, her every sartorial choice breathlessly dissected on countless blogs. You could airlift her into Los Angeles, Milan, New York, London, or any number of other cultural capitals, and she would look at ease and chic, as if she belonged. Trilingual, de Libran speaks English without an accent or, rather, with an accent that is singular and unplaceable, marked by intermittently British-sounding vowels and occasional Italianstyle rat-a-tat consonants. She is, in fact, the embodiment of a contemporary ideal the globe-trotting citizen of the world just as Rykiel was the embodiment of a popular ideal in her own time: the Left Bank Parisienne.” In June of this year, Fanelie de Libran-Phillips cycled 300 miles from London to Paris in 4 days and with a little help from her friend raised almost £4,000.00 (over $5,000 in U.S. dollars) for the Enviromental Justice Foundation. The Environmental Justice Foundation (EJF) is a UK-based non-profit organization working internationally to protect the environment and defend human rights; it strives to empower local communities in the developing world to protect their own environment. EJF tackles critical problems that are often ignored bringing beneficial social and environmental change to some of the world’s largest industries such as cotton and illegal pirate fishing. Julie de Libran and Fanelie de Libran-Phillips were accompanied on this U.S. trip to visit the Pratt Homestead by their husbands, sommelier Stephane de Luze, who is company director of the Bas-Armagnac producing French firm established by his ancestor Raoul de PichonLongueville in 1864 and Simon Phillips, an expert in English furniture, owner and chairman of Ronald Phillips, a long established family business in London was founded in 1952 Ronald Phillips is today one of the leading fine English antique dealers in the world. Simon Phillips took over the business from his father Ronald in the late 1990’s. Gaspard de Libran, the youngest of patriarch, Rolland de Libran’s clan, lives on the U.S.A.’s West Coast where he works as Plant Director for the Starbucks Corporation, a top management position involving management of 10,000 employees. And what of the man who carried the Pratt geneaology into the 21st century? Zadock Pratt would have loved Rolland de Libran! He has built six successful companies during his professional life. The companies were formed over a twenty-three year period with the most recent being incorporated twelve years ago in March 2004. Three of the companies are still One big happy family! The Pratt Museum was an active and joyous place during the de Librans’s visit in early July, Museum Board Member Jim Planck (background, left) is busily filling Pratt descendant Fanelie de Libran-Phillips (background, right) in on some Pratt family history while Prattsville businessman Jim Young (background, far right) looks on happily. Behind Mr. Young, long-time museum supporter, Claudia Bracaliello takes part in the celebration while Nancy Barton, founder and director of the Prattsville Arts Center (middle, center) makes a toast to Zadock Patt’s great-great-great grandson, Rolland de Libran and Prattsville’s own historic treasure, former museum president, Betty O’Hara. 8
360 Degrees the House of Lapeyre, founders of the long-established New Orleans firm, Pike, Lapeyre   Co., Bankers.   Am  d...
360 Degrees active while the remaining three are now listed as inactive. And yet, Rolland still finding time to race a Ford Cortina Lotus in the Masters Pre-66 Touring Cars Championship 2015. Rolland’s great-great-great grandfather, Zadock would have admired a man like that. The de Libran’s have promised to re-visit Prattsville when the youngest of their growing brood are old enough to enjoy it. The Zadock Pratt Museum, for its part, has already started to plan a huge Pratt reunion at which it hopes to re-unit the de Libran’s with their American-based side of the family, the Ingersolls, descendants of Zadock Pratt through his only daughter, Julia Pratt-Ingersoll. What a reunion that will be! complete schedule of activities www.athensculturalcenter.org. December 10. OTSEGO C OUNTY SANTA EXPRESS TRAINS Train is decorated from lights along the outside to garland and ornaments inside. Afternoon train ride with Santa and Mrs. Claus and helpers on Santa Express Trains departing from the Milford, Train Depot on NYS Route 166 (East Main Street) at 2:00PM. Santa and Mrs. Claus will be entertaining kids on board decorated train, there will be Holiday music, goodies and refreshments. Our fun filled Santa Trains run about 2 1/2 hours. All of our Holiday Trains will be bursting with colorful lights, displays, and Christmas Spirit. Trains will be heated if the weather warrants it, but passengers are advised to dress warmly. November 25, 26, December 3, 4, 10, 11, 17. Ticket prices $20 adults, $19 seniors, and $17 children (3-12). Children under 3 Free!!! Reservations and Prepayment are Required!!! Group discounts available. For more info or reservations, call 607-432-2429 (leave a message on the answering machine and we will return your call). Seating is limited. The Leatherstocking Railway Historical Society (LRHS) 136 East Main Street, Milford, NY13807 AHIMSA YOGA & MUSIC FESTIVAL The AHIMSA Yoga & Music Festival promotes traditional and emerging yoga styles, provides beautiful music in a green setting and educates consumers by spotlighting innovations in yoga in New York City’s secluded backyard – the Catskills Mountains. The founders of AHIMSA Yoga and Music Festival have brought together two experiences, music and yoga, to create a single event that will last a lifetime. November 4,5,6. Hunter Mountain Rte. 23A Hunter NY 518-263-4223 http://ahimsayogafestival.com/ ATHENS ANNUAL VICTORIAN STROLL Contemporary art and performances interspersed to our Victorian past. Roving carolers dressed in Victorian garb, resplendent Victorian Santa and horse drawn trolleys harkening back to our 19th century roots, many contemporary performances scheduled throughout the day at the Athens Cultural Center, Athens Municipal Building, First Reformed Church and the Rivertown Senior Center. Storefront windows painted with seasonal scenes. Athens Presque Ballet, under the direction of Bobby LuPone, will present dance works. Hudson River Bells, hand bell ringers from the First Reformed Church, performing at Rivertown Senior Center. Coxsackie-Athens Community Band, at First Reformed Church of Athens from 2-3PM. The Athens Community Chorus performing at Athens Cultural Center. Throughout the Village live music performances, arts and craft vendors, children's holiday cottage contest, historic open houses, ice sculpture carving, cookies, hot chocolate, wine tasting, food specials at local restaurants, house decorating contest, a caricaturist to capture your inner cartoon, face painting, the chocolate fountain (a perennial favorite) and more. Evening bonfire, caroling and tree lighting in the Riverfront Park at 5PM. For a CANDLELIGHT EVENING Experience the magic of Candlelight Evening! Ride through the museum’s grounds in wagons pulled by draft horses adorned with “jingle bells.” Reading of Charles Dickens’ Classic “A Christmas Carol” by the author himself (as portrayed by Michael Henrici) Children take part in holiday arts and crafts activities. Visit with Saint Nicholas. Free rides on the Empire State Carousel - courtesy of Matt Sohns and family. Complimentary wassail. Bonfire on the Tavern Green. Caroling in our candle-lit historic buildings “A Living Nativity” presented by members of the congregation of Christ Episcopal Church. Candlelight Evening visitors should dress warmly and wear boots. December 10 3:00–7:00 pm Admission: $12.00 adults, $10.50 visitors age 65 and over, $6.00 children age 7–12. Free for children 6 and younger. Free for members of the NYSHA. The Farmers’ Museum 5775 State Highway 80 (Lake Road) Cooperstown, NY 13326 607.547.1450 9
360 Degrees active while the remaining three are now listed as inactive. And yet, Rolland still finding time to race a For...
360 Degrees SCHOHARIE COUNTY QUILT TRAIL MAP 2015 10
360 Degrees SCHOHARIE COUNTY QUILT TRAIL MAP 2015  10
360 Degrees Contest. Team consists of a pitcher, who tosses a pickle chip to the catcher, who catches the chip in their mouth, then it is spurted into the Counter’s Jar. 10:00 am to 5:00 pm. Rosendale Recreation Center 1055 Route 32 South, Rosendale, NY. (845) 204-8827. Email:RosendalePickleFest@gmail.com SULLIVAN COUNTY HIDE N SEEKERS Children ages 4-5 and their parents are invited to participate in an early childhood nature program at the Worlds End State Park Visitor Center. Using wildlifebased activities, the program invites children to explore wildlife and the world around them. Stories, music, puppets, crafts, and other hands-on-activities will make learning enjoyable and fun! October 3 through October 31 11:00 am to noon Interested parents may contact the park's Environmental Education Specialists, Jane Swift, for more information and to register their child. Please call her at 570- 924-1601 2016 TICKET PRICES ROUND-TRIPS LEAVING FROM ROXBURY & ARKVILLE ADULT SENIOR CITIZENS CHILDREN (3–12 YEARS) TRAIN ROBBERY SPECIAL HALLOWEEN FEST $18.00 $15.00 $12.00 $35.00 Group discounts are available with prepaid reservations. October 29; 12-3pm: Wurtsboro Halloween Fest. Pet costume parade, kid costume parade, crafts, pumpkin painting, petting zoo, air brush tattoos, food, treats, Boy Scouts Troop 92 selling hot dogs and much more! Registration at Veterans Park 12 - 1pm, $5 pet parade registration fee donated to Sullivan County SPCA. Veterans Park and Sullivan Street, Wurtsboro, NY ULSTER COUNTY NEW SCHEDULE & DAYS OF OPERATION 19TH ANNUAL ROSENDALE INTERNATIONAL PICKLE FESTIVAL OPEN SAT. & SUN. / JULY 2 - OCTOBER 30 NOVEMBER 20. Several Contests. Home Pickling Contest. You can submit 2 jars of what ever you have Pickled, The Jars should be labeled with name, address, phone #, Email and What They Are. Entries must be submitted by 11 am and Judging begins at noon. Later in the Afternoon Pickle Triathlon. Starts with Pickle Eating Contest, where contestants try to eat a small jar of Mt. Olive Pickle Spears. Next Pickle Juice Drinking Contest, where contestants get to drink 24 oz. of pickle juice through a Big Bore Straw. Last Pickle Tossing STATION DEPART ARRIVE STATION ARKVILLE 11:00 A.M. 11:50 A.M. ROXBURY ROXBURY 12:10 P.M. 1:00 P.M. ARKVILLE ARKVILLE 2:00 P.M. 2:50 P.M. ROXBURY ROXBURY 3:10 P.M. 4:00 P.M. ARKVILLE SCHEDULE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. Please be ready to board 10 min. before departure time. Open-air cars provide limited handicapped accessibility. The Arkville Depot has handicapped accessible restrooms. BOOK ONLINE PURCHASE TICKETS AT THE ARKVILLE DEPOT OR ONLINE ANYTIME AT: 11
360 Degrees Contest. Team consists of a pitcher, who tosses a pickle chip to the catcher, who catches the chip in their mo...
360 Degrees 12
360 Degrees  12
360 Degrees ETC SOARING SPIRIT By Lawrence C. Swayne, MD “I was astonished at the effect my successful landing in France has on the nations of the world. To me, it was like a match lighting a bonfire.” Charles A. Lindbergh On May 21, 1927 a tall lanky Minnesota farm boy landed an odd single-engine plane with cloth-doped wings, and a periscope (massive fuel tanks obstructed the forward view) at Le Bourget Field in France, completing the first, non-stop, 3610 mile, transatlantic flight from New York to Paris in 33.5 hours. The achievement garnered the $25,000 Orteig Prize and catapulted Charles Augustus Lindbergh (1902-1974) to international acclaim, while the Spirit of St. Louis became the most renowned plane in aviation history. Courageous hero, pioneering aviator, explorer, and Pulitzer Prize-winning author (as well as an anti-Semite and philanderer), Lindbergh was above all else a complex and obdurate individualist. Sadly, his success led to tragedy (the kidnapping and murder of his son, Charles A. Jr.) and ultimately vilification by the Roosevelt administration for his outspoken non-interventionist stance prior to WW II (he subsequently flew 50 combat missions in the Pacific during the war). Lindbergh used his fame to tirelessly promote the Gospel of Flight through good will tours, charting flights to South America, Europe and Asia, advising Pan American, Transworld Airlines, the Air Force Scientific 13
360 Degrees ETC SOARING SPIRIT By Lawrence C. Swayne, MD     I was astonished at the effect my successful landing in Franc...
360 Degrees Advisory Board and the Strategic Air Command, flying B52 bombers, testing new jets, and supporting Robert Goddard, the father of modern rocketry. Towards the end of his life, however, Lindbergh questioned the values of technology and progress and actively supported indigenous peoples and environmentalism, observing, “If civilization is to continue, modern man must direct the material power of his science by the spiritual truth of his God.” The original Spirit of St. Louis, named for Lindbergh’s financial backers and officially known as the Ryan NYP, hangs from the ceiling in the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. Specifically designed for its historical transatlantic flight, the modified Ryan M-2 strut-braced monoplane with a 46’ wingspan was built in two months by the small Diego firm of Ryan Airlines Corporation. The Spirit was powered by a 223-hp air-cooled, 9-cylinder, Wright J-5C “Whirlwind” engine fueled by five massive fuel tanks totaling 450 gallons, which when filled brought its total weight to 5,135 lbs. Today the Spirit lives on in a recently completed exact replica (which involved several visits to the Smithsonian) built over a twenty year period at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome. Long the dream of founder Cole Palen, who obtained an old restored Wright J-5 Whirlwind engine in the 1970’s, the plane was completed by vintage maintenance manager and pilot, Ken Cassens. On May 21, 2016, the 89 th anniversary of Lindbergh’s original flight, the new Spirit of St. Louis soared above the aerodrome to the delight of several hundred aviation enthusiasts, many of whom were attired in 1920’s apparel. For more information and to “catch the spirit” at future events visit http://www.oldrhinebeck.org. 14
360 Degrees  Advisory Board and the Strategic Air Command, flying B52 bombers, testing new jets, and supporting Robert God...
Letters Dear Mr. Donald Bishop, I must thank you and your staff for putting out such a fine magazine over all these years. Whenever someone, especially from out of town would visit, Kaatskill Life would be preeminently apparent. Your vision, I assume was to educate, and to place before the reader opportunities of every sort in this area. Kaatskill Life did that. Appropriately, advertising highlighted businesses that are essential or interesting and intriguing to locals as well as to tourists. And all of this was done in a high class way with beautiful photography and good writing. I also felt that the magazine had a certain harmony that allowed it to be read, to be put down and to be read again. And after that it could serve as a familiar resource for "Things to Do" in this area. The Hard Copy will be missed greatly; I have let others know. Our area will have less visibility, dimmed interest nad reference without Kaatskill Life. Again thank you for all that you and your staff gave to this area - it has been exceptional. Few people can point to such an extraordinary body of work. You and your staff can. If we can ever be of help, please let us know. Best of Luck Geroge and Gai Mack Editor Please continue our subscription.Your magazine is our favorite of all time and we do not want to be without it. R.McNamara I have enjoyed every issue - the high quality articles and the photography in particular. I grew up spending summers in Alligerville, on the Peterskill, just prior to where it flowed under the D & H Canal and into Rondout Creek. Of course we explored the Catskills and in more recent times have spent vacation time in Cheery Valley and Cooperstown in Schoharie County. John S Scannell Hello, I'm sorry to learn you are discontinuing the print edition of Kaatskill Life. I would like to continue the subscription online. Thank you for all your work putting together such an enjoyable magazine. Kevin Lynch Oneonta NY 13820 Please continue my subscription, although i am broken-hearted at thepassing of such an exquisite print magazine. jb Please continue our subscription on line. Sorry to see a great graphic job go. Jim Williams Dear Sirs: In reply to your postcard, I do want to continue my subscription to Kaatskill Life online. I am really sorry that it will no longer be a printed edition though. I have enjoyed it in that format! Sincerely, Carol Goodrich Dear friends, I will be very happy to receive Kaatskill Life in digital form in the coming years. THE BLACK RAVEN Antiques, Handmade Reproductions, Primitives Goods: Cupboards, Tables, Chairs, Beds, Benches, Chests, Lighting, Shelves, Pewter, Redware, Tin, Textiles, Accessories and more . . . John Stys, Proprietor Phone: 315.941.3766 15
Letters Dear Mr. Donald Bishop, I must thank you and your staff for putting out such a fine magazine over all these years....
Catch the Grahamsville Community Spirit by Lawrence C. Swayne, MD, photography by the author …man made the city, and after he became sufficiently civilized, not afraid of solitude, and knew on what terms to live with nature, God promoted him to life in the country… John Burroughs In the predawn hours of the industrialized, urbanized twentieth century, John Burroughs and others passionately extolled the virtues of rural life, including practicing a sustainable agricultural lifestyle, living in harmony with nature, and caring for one’s neighbors. A century later, these values continue to thrive in the hamlets and villages of the Catskills, none more so than Grahamsville, the southernmost settlement in the Catskill Park. “Grahamsville is a close, stable, middle class community of doers, committed to long-term civic involvement,” according to Cathy Bender, President of the Neversink Fair Association and new Chairperson of this year’s Grahamsville Giant Pumpkin Party. Incredibly, the small hamlet (population 1,719 in 2014) hosts two of the largest festivals within the Catskills, including the Giant Pumpkin Party and Little World’s Fair, both of which attract thousands of attendees each year. opposite page: The 2015 first prize winner in the adult category, weighing 1,136 lbs. and grown by Andy Box. 17
Catch the Grahamsville Community Spirit by Lawrence C. Swayne, MD, photography by the author     man made the city, and af...
left: Joann Gallagher, Director of the Daniel Pierce Library from 19942016. bottom: The new state-of-the-art library, which includes Time and The Valley Museum, a children’s literary center, computer learning stations, community meeting rooms, audiobooks, DVDs, CD-ROMs and more. The library offers free high-speed internet access as well. 18 The earliest pioneers, Tobias Hornbeck and Jacob Klyne, settled about 2 miles below present day Grahamsville in 1743; however, subsequent Indian raids cleared the area. After an Indian and Tory raid on the Rochester frontier settlement of Pine Bush, Officer John Graham led twenty men in pursuit but was ambushed by Indians (accounts vary as to whether 3 or 20 were killed). A stone monument on Route 55 com-
left  Joann Gallagher, Director of the Daniel Pierce Library from 19942016. bottom  The new state-of-the-art library, whic...
memorates the Battle of Chestnut Woods (September 5, 1778) and Grahamsville is named in his honor. With the cessation of hostilities, settlers began trickling into the Neversink Valley in 1788, drawn by game animals, agriculture and the historian’s three T’s – timber, tanning, and later tourists. The six properties comprising the 20-acre Grahamsville Historic District, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979, highlight different industries, architectural styles, and time periods from the hamlet’s history. Located along Route 55 (once an old stage road to Warwarsing completed in 1813), the Marenius Dayton House (a large two-story, Greek Revival building) was originally an official stagecoach stop and inn. A wealthy tanner, Judge Stoddard Hammond, built the 1857 House, a Gothic Revival cottage and the Greek Revival Tannery Store (currently a private residence). The Italian-villa style Southwick House, dating from 1882 was a popular summer resort destination when the era of tourism emerged in Sullivan County. By 1882 Grahamsville had flourished sufficiently to erect the Grahamsville Reformed Church (adding the Memorial Hall in 1935), adjoined by the picturesque 19 th century Grahamsville Rural Cemetery. During the 20 th century, the Rondout Reservoir was created in 1945 near the eastern border of Grahamsville and the Tri-Valley Central School was constructed in 1952 with additions in 1958, 1965, and 1971. The community center and meeting place, however, is the modern Daniel Pierce Library. Pierce, a native son, prospered in real estate and finance in Illinois, before returning to donate $300 for books, establishing the first free public library in Sullivan County. Today Fun & Games 19
memorates the Battle of Chestnut Woods  September 5, 1778  and Grahamsville is named in his honor. With the cessation of h...
the original (1902) charming building is beautifully preserved as part of a new 23,500 square-foot addition completed in 2011 under the direction of Philip Coombe, Jr., former Commissioner of Corrections for the State of New York, and Joann Gallagher, Director of the Daniel Pierce Library from 1994-2016. The new state-of-the-art facility, built with public donations, grants and volunteer efforts from the architect, local ironworkers, and carpenters (and without imposing additional taxes), boasts a geothermal heating and cooling system and houses the Time and Valley Museum, the Children’s Literacy Center, a reading room, computer learning stations, community meeting rooms, and space for 41,000 books, audiobooks, periodicals, videos, DVDs and CD-ROMS. The library offers free high-speed internet access, computer instruction, reading programs, writing workshops, as well as cooking and art and craft classes. It also sponsors concerts and the annual Giant Pumpkin Party, with proceeds supporting the building fund, children’s programs, automation equipment and future book purchases. The Annual Giant Pumpkin Party is held (rain or shine) every autumn at the Grahamsville Fairgrounds on Route 55. Joann Gallagher, chairperson for the past 26 years, indicated the event requires six months of planning and roughly 500 volunteers, including the Lions, CYO, Frost Valley YMCA, firemen, school teachers and students, church groups, businesses, scout groups, Friends of the Library, and library staff. “This is a magical outing for all ages that has become a real family tradition.” The day begins with the children’s costume parade, with clowns, floats and bands marching the quarter mile stretch from the library to the Fairgrounds, where live music helps to kick-off the festivities. Hundreds of pumpkins are for sale to decorate along with face painting and bead and sand art. Children can test their skills at bean bag, ping pong, ball and ring tosses, “fishing,” basketball shooting, baseball pitching or miniature golf on the storythemed nine-hole Book Nook course. There is a hay bale maze for toddlers and an obstacle course for older children, as well as a petting zoo, pony and hay rides, and even small pedal tractors. Dominating the center of the Fairgrounds are large inflatable bounce houses, including: Buzz Lightyear, a large slide, funhouse, haunted house, and of course a giant pumpkin. The 2015 overall winner of the pumpkin decorating contest was Dylan Poley of Neversink, N.Y. 20
the original  1902  charming building is beautifully preserved as part of a new 23,500 square-foot addition completed in 2...
Scarecrow Contest Three unidentified scarecrow entries. Overall winner of the 2015 Scarecrow contest was Patricia Towne of Woodbourne, N.Y. Adults will enjoy browsing the wares of more than two dozen local artisans and craftsman offering distinctive hand-painted bottles and gourds, leather goods, jewelry, ceramics, maple syrup and candy, woodwork and carvings, beautiful fall floral arrangements, crocheted hats, mittens and scarves and homemade jams, jellies, soaps, oils, and incense. Visit the Time & Valley Museum shed and the Daniel Pierce Library tent to pick up a local history book or a used paperback and purchase a gift raffle. For the competitive-minded there are contests galore for all ages, the most coveted of which is the giant pumpkin. Last year’s winner, a whopping 1,136 lbs grown by Andy Box, narrowly edged second place finisher 21 Richard Vogler’s entry at 1,114 lbs. Hay bale tossing also attracted lots of attention with an amazing best toss of 40 feet by Casey Witthohn. This year’s contests include pumpkin decorating (carved and uncarved) and scarecrow competitions that showcase exceptional Halloween designs from multiple age categories. Parade floats, mini-golf, an obstacle course, guessing the pumpkin weight, and country bake-off contests offer everyone a chance to enter and win. With so much to see and do there is also plenty to eat as well. Tempting smells of doughnuts and funnel cakes waft over the festival grounds. In addition, there are hamburgers, cheeseburgers, hot dogs, chili, nachos, popcorn, pretzels, cookies, bread, bagels, cupcakes, brownies, rice cakes, pies, apple crunch, and soft drinks to quell the heartiest of appetites.
Scarecrow Contest  Three unidentified scarecrow entries. Overall winner of the 2015 Scarecrow contest was Patricia Towne o...
Grahamsville’s “other” festival, the Little World’s Fair, is held in the summer and has an even more illustrious history, as the longest running independent fair in New York State. First held by the Grahamsville Farmer’s Club in 1878, the event has been held every year since, except in 1928, when the Chestnut Creek washed out the access bridge, flooding the site. This year, the 137 th annual fair, sponsored by the Neversink Agricultural Society in cooperation with the 4-H Program of the Cornell Cooperative Extension of Sullivan County Agriculture Education and the National FFA Organization and State of NY Department of Agriculture and Markets, was held in August at the Fairgrounds. This good old-fashioned country fair features agricultural shows, with livestock, small animals and 4-H exhibits, craft vendors, community organization booths, live entertainment, contests, games, rides, lots to eat and plenty of fun. As the summer winds down each year, be sure to mark your calendars to attend Grahamsville’s fabulous festivals or simply plan a quiet visit to view the spectacular fall foliage and catch a glimpse of the Grahamsville community spirit. Crafts The author thanks Joann Gallagher for research assistance and/or manuscript review. 22
Grahamsville   s    other    festival, the Little World   s Fair, is held in the summer and has an even more illustrious h...
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KaatskillKritters It’s Just a Click Away by Nicholas Zacharczenko, D.D.S., photo by Brigette Zacharczenko, Ph.D. The click beetle, Alaus oculatus, ( aka snapping beetle, skipjack, spring beetle ) It is a wonderful summertime playmate for a budding young naturalist. This particular Catskill beetle used to always pique my curiosity and occupy my time, albeit for a short while. Eventually, the beetle would either play possum, scuttle away or take flight, but not before revealing its unique secret. What is so interesting about this beetle? It clicks! The click beetle (aka snapping beetle, skipjack, spring beetle), family Elateridae, is of worldwide distribution, with over 7000 recorded species. We have several species in our geographic area, my favorite being the eyed elator (Alaus oculatus). It is a rather large bullet-shaped and flattened insect, close to two inches in length, a mottled grayish/brown in hue, with curved and segmented antennae. And it has two very conspicuous eye spots on the top of its thorax. Obviously, these faux eyes are to thwart predation by mammals and other insects and spiders. However, what makes these beetles so fascinating is their ability to right themselves and scare away enemies by audible clicking. If a skipjack finds itself caught, it will click. If it finds itself on its back, it will first play dead for a while by tucking in all six legs and antennae, then arch its back, and then loudly and forcefully launch itself skyward about a foot high with a discernible click. If it lands on its feet, it quickly scurries or flies away. If it lands on its back again, it will click again and again until righting itself. This click is accomplished by hooking a special spine underneath the thorax into a notch on the belly of this mini-beast. A sudden snap causes the beetle to catapult upwards, off the ground. As you may have guessed, I spent much time purposely catching these beetles in mid-air and laying them on their backs for a repeat of the aerial acrobatics. After a while, however, the beetle and I would both tire and I would relent, leaving the beetle alone. These are relatively tough and long lived insects; even their larval stage survives for 2-6 years, under- 24 ground. The larvae resemble mealworms in the pet trade and are called wireworms because of their hard outer shells and thin elongated appearance. I would always find a few in the soil while harvesting potatoes from our small family garden in Delhi, years ago. The dark orangecolored larvae eat vegetable roots, stems and seeds and can be quite destructive to commercial agriculture. Herbicides are often used on large farms to quell a wireworm infestation. The adult beetles eat leaves and sip nectar and are not nearly as destructive as the youngsters can be. These beetles are commonly found throughout the Catskills; if you chance upon one, don’t be squeamish. Pick it up, put it on its back and have some fun with this delightful creature.
KaatskillKritters  It   s Just a Click Away by Nicholas Zacharczenko, D.D.S., photo by Brigette Zacharczenko, Ph.D.  The c...
2016 Season: May 15 - October 15 NEW! From ADK Find a whole new group of mountains in the Catskills. Open Wednesday - Sunday, 10 am - 5 pm Kids 12 & Under Get FREE Admission Author Alan Via takes you off the beaten path to discover the lesserknown peaks of the Catskill 100 Highest. Softcover, 6” x 9”, $21.95. • Regional maps • Peakfinder map • Full color • GPS coordinates • Ratings 800-395-8080 www.adk.org 51 County Hwy 12, East Meredith, NY 13757 607.278.5744 www.hanfordmills.org
2016 Season  May 15 - October 15  NEW  From ADK Find a whole new group of mountains in the Catskills.  Open Wednesday - Su...
K tskillHiking Ashokan High Point: Apart from the Rest by Peter Senterman photography by Maurice Hemire Ashokan High Point in Ulster County is the prominent peak west of the Ashokan Reservoir extending east from the main mass of the Catskills. It offers limited views from various points around the summit while the summit itself is heavily wooded. There is a sub peak to the east that affords a nice view of the reservoir and the Hudson Valley beyond. To get there is a bushwack through the trees of about four tenths of a mile following the ridge. The major view is off the west side from an overgrowing field that is all that is left of an extensive blueberry heath. This view is to the wall of mountains stretching from Peekamoose on the left to Wittenberg towards the north. 26
K  tskillHiking  Ashokan High Point  Apart from the Rest  by Peter Senterman photography by Maurice Hemire  Ashokan High P...
opposite page: Sandy, Black Lab, and Bailey, Golden Retriever, enjoy hiking on the ascending trail through thick clusters of mountain laurel not yet in bloom. When in bloom, their pink blossoms add greatly to the hiking experience. this page top: The trail register which one must always sign in and out. Should there ever be need for help while on a hike, the information will enable rangers and rescue personnel to find you. center: Trail sign at road. bottom: One of the guiding trail markers. 27 The trail up Ashokan High Point (3,080’) is separate and not connected with any other trail or network of trails making it a destination in itself. Access is from CR 42, Peekamoose Road, running between West Shokan on Rt. 28A south to Sundown and into Sullivan County. There is a kiosk with a map at the parking lot and a regristration box at the beginning of the trail. Please always sign the registers as they are used to gage use to allocate resources and especially to help find missing hikers and hunters when they are overdue. The trail itself is characterized by two totally different sections, the lower portion that follows an old wagon road along Kanape Brook for two and three quarter miles and the steep three and a half mile loop over the summit and back down. The Kanape Brook section is ideal for an easy stroll or short to moderate walk. The first portion is along a babbling stream that flows over the rocks and ledges, never out of sight of the trail. As one gets about two thirds of the way up to the high point of the old road and where the trail leaves to climb the mountain, the character of the brook changes to a more lazy flowing stream. Also the forests change from almost exclusively open hardwoods to a more intimate hemlock woods lining the route and stream. This lower section alone is well worth a visit and is especially suited for people who do not want a steep or rocky trail. It is also great for families with small children as they can play in the shallow brook almost anywhere along the trail. It is one of the few trails in the Catskills of this length to offer such a pleasant walk without steep climbing and a pleasant footway. It is ideally suited for cross country skiing with its easy grades and views through the barren trees across the wide valley.
opposite page  Sandy, Black Lab, and Bailey, Golden Retriever, enjoy hiking on the ascending trail through thick clusters ...
opposite page top: Foot bridge over Kanape Brook at the start of the trail. below: The Kanape Brook trail, for the first two plus miles, is never out of sight or sound of the brook when the water is high enough. 28
opposite page top  Foot bridge over Kanape Brook at the start of the trail. below  The Kanape Brook trail, for the first t...
above: Sandy cautiously crosses one of the interior bridges. below: The spectacular view from an open area looking northwest with Slide Mountain left, tallest in the Catskills, looming over a wall of mountains, The Devil’s Path Range, to the right. For those climbing the mountain following the loop, it is a nine mile round trip and can be very tiring as once leaving the old road at the height of land, either way up is quite steep in places. The loop starts about 150 feet after making a left turn off the old road you have been following. The right, or more easterly part of the loop, has a more steady climb 29 of over one thousand feet from the height of land in a little over a mile. The westerly portion of the loop, while still having steep sections, climbs the elevation in two and a half miles. Both trails wander through mountain laurel which blooms in early to mid June adding to the enjoyment of the climb. Climbing either way when the leaves are off the trees enhances the views with almost continuous limited views to the surrounding mountains and down into the valley. Probably the best view is the one across the open field west of the summit. It was once kept open by periodic burning to kill off tree saplings allowing blueberries to grow for commercial and domestic use, very similar to the blueberry history on the nearby Shawngunk Ridge to the south. While the clearing is growing in, it still offers an expansive view to the northwest of the range of moun-
above  Sandy cautiously crosses one of the interior bridges. below  The spectacular view from an open area looking northwe...
above: The trail crosses and recrosses the Kanape Brook several times while following the brook. Here, Bailey opts for a refreshing wade before continuing. tains comprising Peekamoose to the south followed by Lone, Rocky, Balsam Cap, Friday (mostly hidden by Balsam Cap), Cornell and finally Wittenberg on the north. Slide Mt. looms over all between Rocky and Balsam Cap. To the far right are the mountains of the Devil’s Path in the distance. The field is a great place to relax in the afternoon sun and enjoy the view. If you came up the eastern leg of the loop, the way down via the western leg is much easier with more gentle grades for the most part. There is a fairly steep section about half way down where one drops about 500 feet in a half mile. Ashokan High Point is usually not overly crowded, even on most week- ends. The lower section is rare in the Catskills with it’s long easy grade along a stream. It is a great walk for those who like a wild setting for a walk but do not care to climb steep slopes. A foot or more of snow makes it a pleasant half day cross country ski destination. Including the summit, it makes a great all day hike. The upper section is a moderate climb making for a long nine mile round trip. Dress appropriately for the season and anticipated weather of the day, bring extra food and wear a sturdy pair of boots. Allow enough time to get out before dark. Bring a flashlight or headlamp just in case. Enjoy this out of the way trail and usually uncrowded mountain in the eastern Catskills. Penultimate Paddles in the Piseco, Indian, & Canada Lakes Region: Southeast Adirondacks is the ultimate, flatwater guidebook to paddling the spectacular lakes and rivers of the Southern Adirondacks.The book’s sixty-seven chapters contain over one hundred paddling forays, focusing on, but not limited to, the Indian Lake, Piseco Lake, and Canada Lake Regions. Clear directions, facts, Clear directions,historical historical facts, points p of interest, mileages, detailed maps, photographs, antique postcard reproductions, and a readable, crisp style are hallmarks of Russell Dunn’s guidebooks. Paddlers of all abilities will find Penultimate Paddles a joy to use as they venture into the great outdoors. 252 pages. $19.95. (30) 30
above  The trail crosses and recrosses the Kanape Brook several times while following the brook. Here, Bailey opts for a r...
2016 OPERATING SCHEDULE SUMMER TRAIN OPERATIONS Thursdays, June 9 - September 1 One Roundtrip Train To Cooperstown Departing From The Milford Depot, 136 East Main Street (NYS Route 166), Milford, NY At 10:00 AM, Returning To Milford At 1:00 PM Trains Stop At The Cooperstown Dreams Park Baseball Camp At 10:30 AM, Returning At 12:30 PM FALL FOLIAGE TRAINS Saturdays & Sundays, September 24 - October 9 & Monday, October 10 (Columbus Day) One Round Trip Train Departing From The Milford Depot At 1:00 PM Standard Round Trip Fares For Summer & Fall Foliage Trains Adults: $15.00, Seniors (62 & over): $14.00, Children (3-12): $12.00, Under 3: FREE BROOKS DINNER TRAINS Enjoy a local favorite, Brooks Chicken, in our dining car on Thursday, August 25 at 7:00pm. Reservations & prepayment required. Other meal choices & dates are available. COOPERSTOWN BLUES EXPRESS Trains leave Milford Saturday nights May 14 - October 1 at 7:00pm for a 3-hour, fun filled train ride with bands from across the northeast performing live on board. Food & full cash bar are available. Check out bands performing at www.cooperstownbluesexpress.com. SPECIAL EVENT TRAINS Easter Bunny Express - Saturdays & Sunday, March 19, 20 & 26 @ 2pm Ice Cream Social Train - Saturday, June 25 @ 1:00pm Train Robberies - Saturdays, July 9 & 23, August 13 & 27, September 24 & October 8 @ 1pm Railfan Day - Saturday, August 6, 10am - 4pm, Photo Runby Train @ 1pm The Dinosaur Express - Saturday, September 17 @ 1pm Beer & Wine Tasting Train - Saturday, October 1 @ 1pm Pumpkin Patch Train - Saturday, October 15 @ 1pm Santa Express Trains - Friday & Saturday, November 25 & 26 Saturdays & Sundays, December 3, 4, 10, 11 & 17 @ 2pm Christmas Lights Trains -Saturdays, December 3 & 10 @ 6:30pm Reservations & Prepayment Are Required On All Special Event Trains EXCEPT Train Robberies. Special Event & Special Service Trains Priced Higher Than Standard Fare. office: 607-432-2429 • web: www.lrhs.com • email: wendy@lrhs.com
2016 OPERATING SCHEDULE SUMMER TRAIN OPERATIONS Thursdays, June 9 - September 1 One Roundtrip Train To Cooperstown Departi...
KaatskillGeologist Hanging Deltas & Hummocky Landscapes: Part Two by Robert and Johanna Titus, photography by the authors We have decided to make this the official first article of our second quarter century with Kaatskill Life. We are going to base it on the first one that came out in the summer of 1991. That one was entitled Hanging Deltas and Hummocky Landscapes. Back then only one of us, Robert, did the column. Columns of this sort were rare and, in fact, they still are. He took the opportunity to introduce this sort of popular science writing and the whole science of geology to the readers of a still very young Kaatskill Life magazine. 32
KaatskillGeologist  Hanging Deltas   Hummocky Landscapes  Part Two  by Robert and Johanna Titus, photography by the author...
opposite page (fig 1): Moraine south of Cooperstown. Title page from 1991 article shows kames and kettles. above (fig 2): Five Mile Point. Top of hanging delta rises 50 ft. above current lake level. That first column took readers up the Susquehanna River Valley from Milford to Five Mile Point along the western shore of Lake Otsego. Robert sought to explain all of this landscape in terms of how a valley glacier had shaped it about 15,000 years ago. That glacier had scooped out Lake Otsego’s basin and then bulldozed a heap of sediment to a location a mile or so south of Cooperstown. That heap of earth is called a glacial moraine. Its surface displays a series of sinuous ups and downs (fig. 1),,making up a “kames and kettle” landscape, and those were the hummocks of the hummocky part of the 1991 title. That moraine, along with other sediments left behind by the ice, dammed the Susquehanna Valley 33 and helped form an early version of Glacial Lake Otsego. That early lake had a much higher water level than the one you see today. Soon many creeks were flowing into that higher lake. Each deposited its own delta. Five Mile Point was one of the most prominent of them (fig. 2). Over time, water flowing out of the lake eroded a canyon that still passes down the upper few miles of the Susquehanna. That erosion cut through the moraine dam and Lake Otsego’s water levels dropped by about 50 feet (fig. 3). Five Mile Point was left high and dry. Today, it towers high above the current lake. That’s why geologists call such a thing a “hanging” delta, hence the other half of that 1991 column’s title. Well, in the summer of 2016, the
opposite page  fig 1   Moraine south of Cooperstown. Title page from 1991 article shows kames and kettles. above  fig 2   ...
two of us decided to celebrate our quarter century by redoing that old column. How would we write it today? Now that there are two of us and we are so much more experienced, how would the column be different? We decided not to return to Cooperstown but to work in another area with an analogous Ice Age history. We chose to visit the town of Ellenville in Ulster County. Have you been through Ellenville? We have spoken at their library several times, receiving good responses from receptive audiences. Most people pass through it on their way up to the top of the Shawangunk Ridge. You can turn left on Rte. 52 and drive up to Sam’s Point from Ellenville. But we looked over the map and saw that the town had seen much the same Ice Age history as had the Cooperstown vicinity. We thought this was where we would write our column. The town lies at the bottom of the Rondout Valley. We already knew a lot about the Ice Age history of the Rondout. We had written an article about it several years ago (Kaatskill Life, winter, 2013). That’s the first big difference between 1991 and now. We have become so much more experienced over the past quarter century. We can research a subject so much more effectively now. We knew that during the late Ice Age a local glacier had peeled off from the Hudson Valley Glacier and advanced up the Rondout Valley. We right (fig 3): The origins of a hanging delta. Diagram by Nina Lawford Juviler. opposite page (fig 4): Flat valley floor. Lake bottom east of Ellenville. 34
two of us decided to celebrate our quarter century by redoing that old column. How would we write it today  Now that there...
are not sure how far it reached but that was certainly well to the west of Ellenville. Eventually, the climate warmed and the ice melted. In effect, the glacier was retreating back down the Rondout. But Ice Age climates go through cycles of warming and cooling. There were times when returning cold allowed that Rondout Valley glacier to re-advance. Each re-advance would reach a peak and, in front of it, a heap of sediment would have piled up to form a moraine (fig. 1). Warming would return; the glacier would retreat and leave that moraine behind. It would block the valley and form an earthen dam. A lake would result. A retreating glacier can produce a number of moraines and an equal number of glacial lakes. All that is exactly what had happened in the Susquehanna Valley at Cooperstown. So, we brought our experience to Ellenville. For miles, west of town, we found broad, flat valley floors (fig. 4). These made up the bottom of the old lake that had once filled the valley. It was called Lake Wawarsing. But, just a short distance west of Ellenville we found a hummocky hill, extending from one side of the valley to the other (fig. 5). The only gap was where the Rondout Creek had cut through it (brown on map of fig. 6). We had found a moraine! We explored the area and found several locations where recent excavation had exposed the boulder-rich sediments that typically make up moraines (fig. 7). Now we had started to develop a history; we were looking at our valley glacier in action at a time very late in the Ice Age. It had been 35 advancing westward, up the Rondout Valley, during a cold spell. It had reached just this location when the climate began warming. Melting returned and the ice retreated, leaving the moraine behind. This was the very same thing as can be seen south of Cooperstown. We needed to learn more; we drove back east on Rte. 209 until we were just past Ellenville. There, again, we found a broad, flat valley floor – the bottom of another glacial lake (fig. 8). That meant that Ellenville itself had once been on the bottom of that lake. Now our researches were coming along nicely. We were focusing on the town of Ellenville. Our field work was drawing us towards its Ice Age history. We returned to the town, looked again at our map (fig. 6) and perceived Ellenville as it had been
are not sure how far it reached but that was certainly well to the west of Ellenville. Eventually, the climate warmed and ...
about 15,000 years ago. We saw that, from the northwest, a fairly large creek descended into the heart of the town. It’s called Beer Kill. The kill cut through a substantial topographic platform. It was the very surface that Ellenville was built upon (yellow on fig. 6). Our many years of experience came into play; we recognized that we were looking at the flat top of a hanging delta. Beer Kill had flowed into the old lake and deposited a very large version of the hanging delta at Five Mile Point, north of Cooperstown. Now, we drew upon what we had learned during our years of researching columns. The top of any delta closely matches the levels of the old lake waters. In Ellenville that was at about 380 feet in elevation. Delta tops are also very flat, again matching the old lake levels. Now we had learned something about the lake. Its lake level lay at just above 380 feet. This had been a large delta. It had grown southward from the original mouth of Beer Kill. It had expanded out almost to the south side of the valley. That created a flat surface which was irresistible when people settled here. That platform was an ideal surface for homebuilding (again fig. 9). Its delta sands were easy to excavate for basements and, as those sands were very porous, those basements were well drained and would never flood. And, again, it was large; there was room for a sizable town to develop. What a thing to discover! We had learned why Ellenville had come to be where it is. It is a veritable gift of the Ice Age. But we found something else on the south side of the valley. There, a smaller creek called North Gully 36 descended the south slopes of the valley. It too deposited sediment where it reached the valley floor, but these sediments had a different form. They were not flat-topped; they had a uniformly gentle slope to them. This was not another hanging delta; it was something called an alluvial fan (red on the map, fig. 6). These sediments had been deposited after the lake drained. They were not dumped into lake waters and were therefore unable to build a flat-topped delta. Instead, they were spread out on a gentle slope. Thus, this feature postdates the lake and must be younger. Now we were ready to do something that we have gotten better at over the decades. We were ready to put together an historic sequence. We were able to read the landscape and spin a yarn. Our story began when that valley glacier advanced
about 15,000 years ago. We saw that, from the northwest, a fairly large creek descended into the heart of the town. It   s...
opposite page (fig 5): View of Moraine just west of Ellenville. above (fig.6): The Glacial geology of Ellenville. Yellowhanging delta; Red-Alluvial fan; Brown-moraine; Blue-glacial deposits. 37
opposite page  fig 5   View of Moraine just west of Ellenville. above  fig.6   The Glacial geology of Ellenville. Yellowha...
up the Rondout Creek Valley and passed beyond Ellenville. The second chapter involved the appearance of warmer climates and a retreat of that ice. Then there were cooler climes and another advance. This was the advance that created our Ellenville moraine, and that moraine dammed the valley and created a glacial lake that stretched off to the west (blue on map). Still another return of warmer temperatures led to another retreat of the ice. One right (fig 7): Moraine deposits from Ellenville moraine. See many boulders. below (fig 8): Valley Flat. Lake bottom east of Ellenville. opposite page (fig 9): Delta top which most of Ellenville is built upon. 38
up the Rondout Creek Valley and passed beyond Ellenville. The second chapter involved the appearance of warmer climates an...
more cooling and another readvance created a damming moraine downstream and to the east of Ellenville. That’s when the lake that covered today’s Ellenville formed (darker blue). At that moment the hanging delta was deposited. Eventually the lake drained and then the alluvial fan was deposited. That pretty much finishes the story. Did you follow that? Well, read this paragraph slowly a dozen times or so and keep looking at our map. That should work! Then visit Ellenville and see it all for yourself. We have become seasoned geologists over the decades. Another way in which our writing has changed is that we like to take our readers back in time to the locations we visit. We have learned to use the “mind’s eye,” the human imagination, to portray the geological history of our Catskills. Monday, Aug. 9th, 12,346 BC – We have climbed up to the top of the moraine just west of the future site of Ellenville (fig. 5; brown on map, fig. 6). We have arrived on one of the coldest days of this summer. That’s odd as the climate has actually been going through a cycle of warming for the last several centuries. But you would not know it today; it is cold! We look to the east and below us, a few hundred feet away, is the image of a melting glacier. The ice is a blue gray with numerous large black fissures in it. Vast volumes of water are noisily rushing out of each of them. Immediately below us is a pond. It extends, left to right, across the valley. To our immediate left, a sizable flow of dirty, brown water drains out of that pond and it is rushing through a gap in the moraine. We turn around and look west. 39 Spread out before us and extending far down the valley is a glacial lake. The banks, left and right, still have a little floating ice; it is not yet so warm that all of last winter’s ice has melted. We spy the flow of a brown water current in the middle of the lake. That’s the water coming from behind the moraine. What’s missing is vegetation; there has not been enough time during this warm spell for plants to migrate this far up the valley. This cold day gets worse; soon a snow flurry begins. It isn’t much, but it forewarns the return of still another episode of colder climate. Ice ages don’t give up without a good fight. Contact the authors at randjtitus@prodigy.net. Join their facebook page “The Catskill Geologist.” Everybody else has. Also visit their new blog site www.thecatskillgeolo gist.com.
more cooling and another readvance created a damming moraine downstream and to the east of Ellenville. That   s when the l...
KaatskillTrees Remembering Gray Birch By Ryan Trapani, Education Forester, CFA photography by the author Maximum pasture peaked in New York State in the late 19 th century; that means it also began to decline shortly afterwards. Farm abandonment didn’t occur evenly throughout the state. The least suitable areas for pasture were abandoned earliest. On the other hand, those with longer growing seasons, better soil, or abundant freshwater springs for livestock were abandoned later. I was born in 1981, almost 100 years after the agricultural peak in New York State. Farm abandonment was more delayed where I grew up in New Paltz than some of the more mountainous parts of Ulster County. The “hill-farms” on the nearby Shawangunk Ridge had long been forgotten by the time I reached present status. However, the farmingfriendlier Wallkill Valley offered both alluvial soils conducive for growing vegetables and rolling hills more practical for pasturing dairy cows or fruit trees. Eventually, even farms in the Wallkill Valley would share – with the mountains – a presence of abandonment. opposite page: Gray birch leaves are smaller than those of paper birch. They are triangular and flutter or tremble in the wind similar to quaking aspen. left: In contrast to gray birch, the bark of the paper birch, Betula papyrifer (aka white birch or canoe birch) peels and is predominately white in color. 41
KaatskillTrees  Remembering Gray Birch By Ryan Trapani, Education Forester, CFA photography by the author  Maximum pasture...
By the time I was tall enough to walk 200 yards, most of the farmland had already been abandoned 20 to 30 years earlier. My friends and I found a recently widowed landscape fresh for exploring. The “woods” was a place where the tall grass and small trees grew. We found abandoned farm-ponds and wondered why someone had placed cages around the base of right: Gray birch bark is gray in color and smoother than paper birch bark. below: Gray birch is a small tree normally less than thirty feet tall. This tree is often found bending toward the light away from neighboring competing trees. 42
By the time I was tall enough to walk 200 yards, most of the farmland had already been abandoned 20 to 30 years earlier. M...
decrepit old trees. Hey, we didn’t know they were old vole screens used for protecting apple trees. We played on rusted farm equipment and wondered how some of the cars reached their present wooded destination. When you’re 8-years-old it’s hard to imagine long-term changes or the woods as a field. We rode our bikes through old barn stalls, swung on grape vines and feasted on blackcaps in between. We got lost, found ourselves, lit fires (some got away), built forts, played war with older kids and found our first girlfriends there too; all in those young woods. More relevant to our present discussion are the unique trees we found; at least I thought they were. In one area were two rows of cedar trees “in the middle of the woods.” Looking back at it, they must have been white cedar. The previous landowner must have planted them to line an old farm road for aesthetics. We were ignorant to the past, and I thought I discovered some Viking’s hallway (or something cool like that) hidden in the woods. There was one tree that seemed to always take on unique shapes. It was gray to white and sometimes would bend and slope. These trees made excellent climbing trees. I called them “rollercoaster” trees; though not sure that was the best term, it made sense at the time. I could walk up these trees to a point and then slither out to their ends; that was a fun thing to do. The tree I’m describing must have been gray birch (Betula populifolia). Gray birch sort of resembles white birch or paper birch (Betula papyrifera). Both trees look similar; they both are relatively small trees with white bark. Paper birch has bark that peels more readily, while gray birch is smoother. Both are fastgrowing trees that do not live as long nor grow as tall or thick as some of their fellow trees. Gray birch is some- what smaller than paper birch; it seldom lives past 50 years old and is normally less than 30 feet tall. Gray birch leaves are smaller and far more triangular. From far away, they can be mistaken for the leaves of trembling aspen; both flutter in the breeze. Lastly, gray birch has a much smaller range than paper birch and is normally found farther south. Gray birch dips into New Jersey and parts of Virginia from Nova Scotia with outliers in Ohio. Paper birch dips south into New York State but mostly is found growing trans-continentally throughout Canada from the Atlantic to the Pacific. Paper birch is rarely found in the Hudson Valley, at least where I grew up. In higher elevations on the nearby Shawangunk Ridge or Catskill Mountains one can find paper birch more readily. Whether it’s paper birch, gray birch, or even aspen, these trees seem to share one thing in common. They all indicate a recent past involving some sort of mass exposure to sunlight, strong winds, land clearing for agriculture or housing, etc. In my case, it was the latter two. Most of the woods I experienced then had been recently abandoned from agriculture in the last 30 or so years. However, some portions included abandoned housing developments and gravel pits too. Gray birch – like paper birch and aspen – is shade-intolerant. It requires full sunlight to grow and cannot tolerate extended competition for sunlight. When longer-lived trees begin to grow beside it, gray birch gets cranky. It will bend its way to the nearest porthole accessing sunlight. In doing so, it can take on some unique shapes or become a “roller-coaster” as mentioned earlier. Besides the lack of sunlight, the only other significant stressors on it seem to be wind, ice, and heavy snow. Under extreme conditions, it bends 43 readily, making for uniquely shaped trees in the woods. Gray birch’s ability to bend made it useful in the past for making barrel hoops. Hoops were used to keep wooden barrels together. Wooden barrels were used to ship goods like apples, nails, or potatoes. Although gray birch wood can be easily worked with tools, its uses have been limited since it never attains large diameters or lives very long. Instead it seems it has been mostly used – deliberately and accidentally – as a “nurse tree” for the next cohort of trees. Gray birch can grow just about anywhere there is plenty of sunlight. It has been successfully used in revegetating extremely acidic mine spoiled areas. Its roots and leaves help prepare the soil for longer lived trees – maple, beech, black birch, hemlock, etc. The woods I grew up in have matured since the 1980s. I bet there are now more oak and maple trees and less gray birch. On closer examination, gray birch is probably there somewhere, waiting for the next dose of sunlight to occur. Its seeds are patiently banked in the soil. If an opening does occur again, seeds can be transported there via wind from far away. If it is cut, it can sprout from the root-crown. If it is burned, its thin bark is easily damaged, but no matter; as long as there is more sunlight, gray birch will be preserved. Small gray birches offer excellent cover for small mammals as well as browse for deer and rabbits. Ruffed grouse supposedly love to feed upon its catkins (male flowers) too. If you don’t want to wait for a gray birch to occur, just plant one. Unlike other trees that grow taller, you can plant gray birch near the house. Its bark is aesthetically pleasing and the tree seems to have few diseases. Just add sunlight and go from there. www.catskillforest.org
decrepit old trees. Hey, we didn   t know they were old vole screens used for protecting apple trees. We played on rusted ...
Catskills Calling By Lillian Browne Like all things fashionable, the Catskills are once again trendy. People are connecting with the region in a way that celebrates the elemental nature of the farm-to-table movement and minimalism that was once a way of life in the area. The peaks, lesser hills, forested lands and spacious pastures were at one-time utilitarian in their function and the area flourished with farming and bluestone and lumber industries from the late 18th through the mid-20th centuries. The landscape evolved as it was stripped of the bluestone that outfitted the sidewalks of New York City and of the prolific hemlock stands harvested for the trees’ bark that fueled the tanning industry. Wood acid factories followed and by the end of the Civil War, hemlock forests were gone, and rivers and streams suffered from toxic runoff. The ruthless clear cutting and carving up of natural resources of the Catskills denuded the hillsides and her- 44 Browne y Lillian photo b alded the call of environmentalists to protect the once pristine land and water from further pollution – a movement that exists today. The Catskills were also revered for other reasons and had become inspirational to artists and writers, such as Thomas Cole and John Burroughs, who crafted odes to the landscape through paintings and poetic essays that helped frame the region as a haven for future artists. above: Mural in Arkville inset: Joanna Murphy opposite page: Mural in Margaretville
Catskills Calling By Lillian Browne  Like all things fashionable, the  Catskills are once again trendy.  People are connec...
KaatskillSketches The region is now flush with artisans hoping to hone their craft and carve a living out of the same landscape; and in the way that all things old become new again, the Catskills are in the midst of an identity crisis. Nowhere in the Catskills is that more true than in Delaware County. The rolling hills, now peppered with resurrected swaths of hemlock and crystal clear streams protected as the primary drinking water source for New York City residents, are once again calling to entrepreneurs and artists. There is a subtle shift toward gentrification evidenced by the peeled-back edges of the “No Trespassing” signs along Delaware County’s borders. That is both frightening and exciting to people like Joanna Murphy, an artist who divides her time between her home on Elk Creek Road in Delhi and Manhattan’s East Village. Murphy, like other newcomers to the Catskills, enjoys the laid-back lifestyle but fears too many others might want to partake in that joy. A conundrum, she concedes, as she takes a zen-like breath and makes a proclamation of abundance to ward off the mojo of scarcity driven thoughts. Murphy, an oil painter who favors landscapes, has spent much of the past 15 years in Delaware County, inspired by its natural beauty. She has been fortunate to cultivate an audience in Delaware County and has created several pieces of public art in the form of landscape murals. Persistence is key when one is an artist, she explained, especially when one lives and makes art in Delaware County. Her persistence has paid off and through a series of art grants received through the New York State Council on the Arts, the O’Connor Foundation, a Kickstarter campaign, the Michelle MacNaught Memorial Fund and donations from individuals and busi- nesses, Murphy has been able to cocreate public art pieces that have spruced up otherwise unremarkable spaces with community participation. Two of the murals appear in Arkville, side-by-side, on The Caboose B&B multi-use building near the railroad tracks on state Route 28. She solicited community participation by involving students at Margaretville Central School, where she taught a landscape painting class. By asking students what was important to them about where they lived, she created a landscape scene that depicts their environment and their answers - natural resources and animals. Murphy also polled residents the old-fashioned way, by standing in front of the local post office and grocery store and asking passers-by their opinion as to what should be included in the murals. Not only was it a way to enlist a sense of community ownership in creating the murals, it also helped to rejuvenate and revitalize the area 45 after the devastation caused by Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee in late August and early September 2011. Murphy said the two Arkville murals also spearheaded community pride and residents started fixing up their properties, which resulted in a more aesthetically pleasing and a more connected community. She also wanted to do something as a way to “give back” that reflected her part in the community. A third Murphy mural that was privately commissioned following her completion of the Arkville pieces can be found on the Suites on Main village of Margaretville, which she has dubbed the “Cauliflower Mural.” Cauliflower has a place in Margaretville’s history as a force that changed the fortune of the region. In the 1920s, it was believed that cauliflower would eventually replace dairy farms as an economic driver. However, corporate competition dashed that dream and the time
KaatskillSketches The region is now flush with artisans hoping to hone their craft and carve a living out of the same land...
Mural on side of Stewart’s in Delhi when cauliflower was king is remembered by the Margaretville mural and an annual festival celebrated in the village in late-September. Murphy was also privately commissioned for a four-part mural series in Delaware County’s Walton. Those murals adorn interior walls that overlook an indoor swimming pool and basketball court in a renovated dairy barn on private property. Most recently, in June 2016, in the Village of Delhi, the county seat, Murphy created a mural funded by the Michelle MacNaught Memorial Fund. Similar to the Arkville murals, Murphy enlisted the assistance of local high school students to create a pastoral landscape that includes rolling hills, country roads and a Belted Galloway cow, all emblematic of the area. The Delhi mural appears on the side of The Stewart’s building on the village’s Main Street. Her signature style, always showing softened jagged edges of an anywhere-Delaware County horizon, also contains a signature palette. She favors greens, electric green in particular, which she says she finds a way to work into each of her works. “It’s the prime color of the world,” she said. “And from that, every kind of loveliness arises.” It’s also a color that she says is difficult to work with because too much of it tires the eyes. Nature, she said, especially that of her Delaware County backyard, 46 teaches her how to be curious about change. Those are lessons, she explained, that she loves to share with art students. “Everything in nature has a purpose. Life can be very unpredictable and that is so very prevalent here,” she said. She talks about Delaware County weather, unpredictable and extremely changeable, which also explains why she no longer paints plein air but also explains why she loves painting landscapes. She has always liked to be close to the earth. Even as a child she was moved by nature, rolling around in the dirt and smelling its dusty brownness. “It’s my legacy,” she declares with a just-realized smile.
Mural on side of Stewart   s in Delhi when cauliflower was king is remembered by the Margaretville mural and an annual fes...
A legacy, however, is not a living and Murphy has struggled, like almost every other artist, to make ends meet with her art. Though she is able to make a modest living as an artist, she must supplement her income through the use of ’ other skills, which include working for designers in New York City. However, she said, it’s hard for her to create art in New York City. She   no longer desires Ù  celebrity   status and instead has thought honestly      µ  about just simply surviving in the Catskills. “I just want to make art that’s important to me,” she said. Theshe internet, said,evolved Both and her she art have to her satisfaction. The internet, she said, has helped her gain traction and put her on equal footing with downstate artists who can personally pres        ent their work to a thriving market. It is a myth that artists must live, work and create in New York City in order to be successful, she said. She would rather be in a place that nourishes and satiates her - Delaware County. Her work this year has been about making connections between peo  Ù     ple, wildlife, nature and communities. “I am painting a lot of narratives about landscape not being the most important thing, but how it holds and µ makes connections or shows a lack   of connection,”   Murphy  said.  In addition to the natural world, Murphy is inspired by children - their curiosity and their un-rehearsed views. Because of that, she said, particularly over the past year, she has found herself more willing to include figures in her paintings. The figure of a young girl can be found in the Delhi mural,  which  was not planned  but included,  after a young girl visited Murphy on successive Thursday afternoons while the mural was being created. After several weeks of watching asked   her paint,   Murphy    the  girl if she wanted to help with the mural. The girl added flowers to the mural,       which inspired Murphy to add the young girl to the mural as well. Her short term goal is to create two more murals, or pieces of public art one in Walton and one in Grand Stewart’s Mural 47 Gorge. Whether subconsciously or purposefully planned, the creation of those two additional murals would provide another connection between distant parts of Delaware County.
A legacy, however, is not a living and Murphy has struggled, like almost every other artist, to make ends meet with her ar...
The Catskills: Its History and How It Changed America by Stephen M. Silverman and Raphael D. Silver Alfred A. Knopf (hardcover, 450 pages, $45) Reviewed by John Rowen look exactly like they do in real life days or weeks after seeing a scene is incredible to me. This book is generously illustrated with high quality artwork: paintings, photographs and maps. But it is with the artwork that some of the book’s troubles begin. One painting is described as showing a Hudson River sloop but the ship is a schooner. Some of the paintings of Cole’s are not his best. Silverman tends to devote more paragraphs and pages to events in the Hudson valley or New York City than is warranted to explain Catskill history. These regions are interconnected but if he had devoted less time to the places outside the Catskills he could have spent more time on our region. One area where he could have spent more time is in explaining what the Catskill Park and the Forest Preserve are. His discussion of these two important concepts was short and muddled, something that a page or two more could have fixed. A discussion on fracking covers 11 pages. Fracking is an environmental challenge but a shorter discussion would have allowed spending time talking about efforts in the Catskills to develop sustainable energy. Silverman’s writing is generally good yet is confusing in places. He quotes contemporary authors and has their books in the bibliography. But he writes that the author “said” as opposed to “writes” something. Mr. Silver planned to prepare a documentary about the Catskills and interviewed many regional historians. He died in a skiing accident. It may be that Silverman used these interviews but it would have been nice if this had been clarified. It appears that the references in this book cover the Catskill experience. It was odd that Wray Rominger or his Purple Mountain Press were not included in the acknowledgments even though many of the press’ books were consulted. Also missing were any articles from this magazine. Silverman will give people newly coming to the subject of the Catskills a good overview. And if I didn’t like some of the shortcomings, who knows: maybe I will try to write the next history. Stephen Silverman’s and Raphael Silver’s new book The Catskills has some strong positive features and some frustrating ones. This is the first region-wide Catskill history since Alf Evers wrote The Catskills: From Wilderness to Woodstock. Since Evers wrote his book in 1973 and reissued it in 1982 with an Afterword, a lot has happened in the region. Silverman has done a competent job of including the new developments since Evers last wrote. He uses a format that is topical and chronological. For example, he has chapters on: the Hudson River School painters; Jay Gould and John Burroughs; and the Woodstock festival. He puts all the information on these subjects into one chapter but the Hudson River School chapter precedes the ones on Gould, Burroughs and Woodstock. Silverman’s account of Woodstock thoroughly captures the facts of the event and delightfully captures the energy of the event. I would not have wanted to be stuck in the mud or traffic jams at Woodstock but Silverman captures how everyone there felt so good about the gathering. The chapter on the Hudson River School is one of the best in the book. I have read many, many pages about these artists and seen their paintings. But it was not until I read this book that I realized their great achievements. In 2016, if you want to paint landscapes, you can take an easel and paints in tubes - - or water colors - - and sit outside, en plein air, and paint the Catskills or anywhere else. Thomas Cole, Frederic Church and their colleagues could not do that. They had to mix their paints from scratch and could not do that in the field. They could sketch the views and make notes. But they had to paint what they saw in a studio away from the scene. That Church could make the Catskills 48 BOOKS IN REVIEW CHANGING AMERICA
The Catskills  Its History and How It Changed America by Stephen M. Silverman and Raphael D. Silver Alfred A. Knopf  hardc...
Penultimate Paddles in the Piseco, Indian and Canada Lakes Region: Southeast Adirondacks By Russell Dunn. (John Haywood Photography Publisher, soft cover, 252 pages, $19) Reviewed by John Rowen In a few places, one map illustrates trips in several chapters. An overview page, giving readers a heads up that a set of trips are linked or close together, would have made this an even stronger guide. In the helpful and crucial safety information in the book’s 20-page introduction, Dunn states, “This paddling guidebook is intended for experienced, intermediate paddlers who are comfortable . . . on the water and well versed in self-rescue procedures.” Even if a person does not fit this qualification or even if a person is not interested in kayaking or canoeing, this is still an appealing book to read. Dunn draws the reader in by making him or her feel how attractive and secluded the destinations are. I hope to hike through the woods to some of them. Some trails to the destinations would be worth cross-country skiing, especially with the reward of a mountain vista over a frozen lake or pond. Some waters seem to be fishable from shore or a float tube, although Dunn does not comment on fisheries. The Paddling Notes in this book will appeal to armchair historians or travelers. Even if I do not make it to places in this book, Dunn’s capable and congenial writing and his strong assortment of photographs allow me to envision the destinations in my mind and make me feel I had traveled many miles while sitting home! In writing this book, Dunn spends a significant amount of time considering place names. I have read a lot about the Adirondacks and spent the equivalent of weeks examining topographical and watershed maps. Yet until I read this book, I never knew there was a Whisky Brook Pond, a Cherry Brook or Miami River. It took reading this book to learn that the names of Canada Lakes and West Canada Creek came not from our neighbor to the north but from “Kanata,” a Native American word for “village.” Whether you kayak, canoe or just like reading about the outdoors, Penultimate Paddles has something just for you. Russell Dunn is a Capital Region writer, hiker and kayaker. An occasional Kaatskill Life contributor, he has written 14 books set in the Catskills and upstate New York: guides to kayaking, waterfalls and hikes as well as local histories. In his latest guide, Dunn leaves the Catskills and Capital Region. He strikes out to paddle the rivers, streams, small lakes and ponds of the southern Adirondacks. Penultimate Paddles includes 67 excursions in Fulton, parts of Herkimer, Hamilton, Warren and lower Essex Counties. The destinations, while varied and alluring, do not include Great Sacandaga Lake, Lake George or Schroon Lake. Each chapter has a standard, user-friendly format. Information provided includes: launch sites; GPS coordinates; directions to the launch site; water body size, depth and elevation above sea level; and “paddling notes,” history and descriptions that give the reader a sense of place. The book is generously illustrated with black and white photographs and reproductions of old postcards. Some views are panoramas of the view from a kayak or the shore, others are intimate studies of something found along the way. Dunn provides generally clear, custom-made maps for nearly every paddle. It appears that elevations on some maps are in metric units and in feet on others - - or in the text descriptions. For example, in the section on Trout Lake, the text says Trout Lake Mountain is about 2,200 feet high while the map appears to show it as 679 meters high. This might be confusing in a spot or two. But all of these trips would require a larger atlas or map for supplementary directions. Such information plus the text, which generally is clear, overcomes any confusion. 49 BOOKS IN REVIEW YONDER PADDLING
Penultimate Paddles in the Piseco, Indian and Canada Lakes Region  Southeast Adirondacks By Russell Dunn.  John Haywood Ph...
KaatskillLodgings Resourcefulness and a Bit of Whimsy on an Old Schoharie Farm by Kaatskill Life Staff In the aftermath of Hurricane Irene, Martha Crockett decided to return to the Schoharie Valley farmhouse just outside of the Village of Middleburgh that had been in her family since 1956. The early 1800s structure had been devastated by flooding from the storm, but she could not bear to see the farm fall into ruin. Martha Koska Crockett, owner of The Farmhouse holds the sign she painted. 51
KaatskillLodgings  Resourcefulness and a Bit of Whimsy on an Old Schoharie Farm by Kaatskill Life Staff  In the aftermath ...
Sometime after the home’s initial construction nearly two hundred years ago, it was divided into two apartments. Now five years after the storm, a full renovation of both apartments has provided Crockett with a rental unit in the front of the house that sleeps eight guests, and she permanently resides in the back apartment. A favorite of outdoor enthusiasts, The Farmhouse, as Crockett calls her rental unit, provides easy access to hunting, hiking, and fishing, as well as other local attractions, such as Howe Caverns, which is only 12 miles away. Middleburgh is a quaint town lined with shops and eateries and ideal for a quiet stroll, but for those interested in a bit more of a stretch of the legs, the peak of Vroman’s Nose outside of town offers an amazing view for a relatively short hike. Crockett’s Farmhouse has a fully equipped kitchen and a comfortable living area, with wide-planked floor boards and an old wooden banister that together hint at the home’s original construction. Two elegantly appointed bedrooms with full sized beds feature charming country-style furnishings, while a third bedroom can sleep four in twin beds spaced out around the room. Renovation of the house entailed removal of walls and ceilings and the installation of new sheetrock, Martha points to where the flood waters from hurricane Irene reached. The flood waters also took out the historic Blenheim Covered Bridge nearby. 52
Sometime after the home   s initial construction nearly two hundred years ago, it was divided into two apartments. Now fiv...
ens and three donkeys named Jack, Jill, and Donkey. The revenue generating renovation and farmland rental are indicative of the changing times and the kinds of resourceful utilization of assets that have enabled some homeowners of the Catskills to maintain properties in the aftermath of storm devastation. But Crockett’s purchase of the donkeys since her return to the region is pure whimsy on her part, harkening back to the time when animals populated the farm she grew up on. Talking about the uniqueness of the experience of staying at her farmhouse, Crockett says, “Visitors love to come and see the animals – the windows, electricity and plumbing. For further revenue, Crockett rents out much of the 85 acres of land surrounding the home for farming, with a long field of crops beginning just steps from the structure and extending towards the mountains that border the valley in the distance. A trail leading away from the back of the house winds past a 150 year old barn, which houses chick- 53 chickens and the donkeys. A lot of the visitors we get don’t see farm animals every day, so they like to walk back here and it helps to remind them that they’re on an old Catskill farm.”
ens and three donkeys named Jack, Jill, and Donkey. The revenue generating renovation and farmland rental are indicative o...
Flooding from Irene also removed the old barn from its foundation and carried it seven feet . Heritage Barns in Waco Texas bought and dismantled it and subsequently sold the barn to a gentleman who erected it as a living room in his home in Houston. 54
Flooding from Irene also removed the old barn from its foundation and carried it seven feet . Heritage Barns in Waco Texas...
photography by Larry Swayne
photography by Larry Swayne
KaatskillDining Inventive Cooking at The Green Iguana Bistro by Kaatskill Life Staff Chef Bob Stevenot of the Green Iguana Bistro in Schoharie County’s Village of Middleburgh is a graduate of the culinary program at SUNY Cobbleskill and has cooked for Disney as well as trained personnel for a subsidiary of British Airways. Joining Stevenot as coowner of the business is Chef Riley Proctor and together they team up to bring gourmet accents to traditional American fare. top right: Potato Vodka produced by Barbers Farm Distillery of Middleburgh is served at the Green Iguana Bistro. 57
KaatskillDining  Inventive Cooking at The Green Iguana Bistro by Kaatskill Life Staff  Chef Bob Stevenot of the Green Igua...
The 8oz. burger is a highly recommended specialty at the Green Iguana and comes in a wide range of options, from the Classic, with traditional lettuce and tomato toppings, to the Hawaiian, which features grilled pineapple, teriyaki sesame glaze and avocado smash, all made from natural Angus beef, cooked to succulent perfection, and served on brioche or pretzel rolls. For cheese lovers, Stevenot and Proctor offer the Grilled Cheese Burger, which is topped with American cheese and served between two grilled cheese sandwiches. A similarly decadent dish for those with more sophisticated tastes is the Blue Iguana, with bacon, mixed greens, crumbled blue cheese, and blue cheese dressing on a pretzel roll. Some of their most daring offerings include the Breakfast Burger, which is topped with a fried egg and served on a bagel, or the Ship to Shore Burger, which has BBQ grilled chicken, BBQ pulled pork, ham, bacon, cheddar, shredded lettuce, tomato, onion and shrimp. center: Ahi Tuna on vegtable salad. left: Pulled Pork on vegtable salad. 58
The 8oz. burger is a highly recommended specialty at the Green Iguana and comes in a wide range of options, from the Class...
Though one could never really grow tired of their burger offerings, other items on the menu feature similarly creative flares, like the Ahi Tuna Tacos and the Crab Cakes with chutney salsa. Enticing starters include Calamari with Wasabi ginger sauce on the side and Blue Cheese Sliders. Stevenot and Proctor feature a very tasteful and sensitive use of herbs and spices, which combine to accentuate the food, with no one flavor overpowering another. And their food is delicately salted. Asked about his moderate use of salt, Chef Stevenot says simply, “There is salt on the table.” Housed in a modest building that used to serve as the town library, the ambiance is welcoming, with a comfortable sitting area greeting guests as they enter and a bar set apart from the main dining room. In their second year of operation, the Green Iguana has quickly emerged as a favorite of locals and visitors in search of a gourmet dining experience in a down-to-earth setting. Locally sourced top left: The Bistro’s signature sandwich. above: Bob Stevenot, in the background, and Riley Proctor team-up to create a one-of-a-kind restaurant featuring multiple, imaginative burgers and sandwiches. below: Susan Wargo our very cheery hostess. food is regularly on the menu and they are working on expanding their vegetarian offerings, which currently include burger variations that feature eggplant, sweet potato, and a vegan mash of beets, walnuts, oats, garlic, mushrooms, and black beans. The Green Iguana is open for dinner every day of the week except Monday and for lunch Thursday through Sunday, and they offer a wide selection of sandwiches that are tasty at any hour, from the Philly Cheese Steak to The Cuban, with pulled pork, ham, Swiss cheese, pickles and house made spicy mustard. They feature a pastrami version of the Reuben sandwich and the Green Iguana Turkey Club is topped with an avocado smash. Most dishes are served with house hand cut fries, but adventurous diners might ask for sweet potato fries instead and a cheese sauce for dipping that will wet the palette for a truly unique dining experience. 59
Though one could never really grow tired of their burger offerings, other items on the menu feature similarly creative fla...
IM A G E S O F T H E N O R T H E R N C AT S K I L L S Fine landscape photography by Francis X. Driscoll Photography at Twigz ’n Things 5449 Main Street, Windham, 518-734-5877 Tannersville Antiques & Artisan Center 6045 Main Street, Tannersville for more information, 518-589-5600 ''Beginner Digital Photography'' Oct.18, 25, Nov. 1, 8. eves 6-8pm At the Mt. Top Library, in Tannersville. Lecture/Exhibition ''The Art Of Waterfall Photography'' Sat. Nov. 26, 2 - 4pm At Tannersville Antiques And Artisans Main St Tann. 518-589-5600 Both presented thru CGCC. Call 518-828-4181 Ext. 3341 www.francisxdriscoll.com Phone: 518-734-5192
IM A G E S  O F T H E N O R T H E R N C AT S K I L L S Fine landscape photography by Francis X. Driscoll Photography at Tw...
5 1/2 Main Street, Delhi, NY 13753 Voice: 607-746-2281 Fax: 607-746-3571 www.greatwesterncatskills.com info@greatwesterncatskills.com MONDAYS: 5:30 P.M YOGA. Classes are a combination of Bikram, Hatha & Vinyasa flow- all levels welcome. Mondays - $10/pp. Season passes also available. Classes will be held outdoors in the event field on the stage, in the mountains, with the trees, flowers, birds, sun, clouds, and breezes or by the pond weather permitting. We will move inside the Carriage House during inclement weather and winter months. We have extra mats so don’t let that stop you. 8052 County Highway 18 Bloomville, NY 13739607-538-1235 info@ turquoisebarn.com WEDNESDAYS; 7-10PM: TRIVIA NIGHT. Come put your knowledge to the test every Wed. @ 7pm. Teams 1-7 people. Winning team gets 50% off the bill. Cara Vaughn as your hostess. O’Neill’s Shire Pub, Main St., Delhi. www. theshiredelhi.com 607-746-8758 THURDAY’S; 8:30PM: KARAOKE Every Thursday! Late Nite Happy Hour- 9-11pm. DJ Pat Del Rosario. O’Neill’s Shire Pub 123 Main Street  Delhi, NY 607-746-8758 Through December 2016; 5:30pm: Family Fun Nights. Event will take place first Friday of each month. Pool games and activities, and each Fun Night will be different. Fee. Catskill Recreation Center, Arkville. www.catskillrecreationcenter.org 845 586-6250. Courtney Funeral Home 25 Townsend St. Walton NY 13856 607-865-4383 www.courtneyfh.com OCT 15, Nov 19, Dec 17, Jan 21, Feb 18, March 18, April 15, May 20; 7pm: JAM SESSION. Live music, table games and refreshments. Bring instrument or games or come for fun. Free. St. John’s Episcopal Church, 134 ½ Main St. Delhi. OCT 17, NOV 21, DEC 19, JAN 16, FEB 20, MARCH 20, APRIL 17, MAY 15; 7pm: WRITERS EVENINGS. Community members invited to come and listen to local writes read their new works and participate in moderated Q&A period following each reading. Stamford Village Library, 117 Main St., Stamford. 607-326-7908 OCT 18, NOV 15, DEC 20, JAN 17, FEB 21, MARCH 21, APRIL 18, MAY 16; 2pm: BOOK AND FILM CHAT. William B. Ogden Library, 42 Gardiner Place, Walton 607-865-5929 OCTOBER 21, APRIL 21,MAY 9; 6:30pm: COMMUNITY DINNER. Bring dishto pass. Followed by entertainment. Weather permitting. North Harpersfield Community Hall, 4289 County Hwy 29, Jefferson. 607-278-5564 or 607-278-6750 OCTOBER 8; 7pm: Night of Entertainment 2016, free variety show, at the Walton Theatre Entertainment: Catskill Valley Wind Ensemble, Roundhouse Rockers, Betwixt Bothered and Bewildered, After Midnight. Doors open at 6PM. Annual Raffle: win up to $1,000! Raffle Tickets available at: Breakey Liquors, Breakey Motors, C&C Feeds, D&D of Walton, Little Dipper, Appliance Plus, Feather & Stone Restaurant, West End Supplies. Walton Theatre, Gardner Place, Walton. OCTOBER 8; 11am - 5pm: PLATTEPALOOZA. Mountain biking and Geocaching, s’more roasting, seasonal microbrews on tap and tastings, BBQ, Ski shop sale, vendors, scenic fall foliage, live music, kid activities and more. Free. 469 Plattekill Mountain, Plattekill Mountain Road, Roxbury. http://plattekill.com/events/plattepalooza. OCTOBER 8,9; TASTE OF THE CATSKILLS. Showcases food, beer, crafts and more. Fee. All Day. Maple Shade Farm, 2066 Cty. Hwy 18, Delhi. http:// tasteofthecatskills.com October 9; 12-7pm: Fiddlers! 23. Fiddlin’, dancin’, good eats and more. Fee. Roxbury Arts Center, 5025 Vega Mountain Road, Roxbury. 607-326-7908 October 9; 10am-3pm: Museum Site Closes for Season. Last day to tour historic 1797 Gideon Frisbee House and other buildings. Exhibit galleries, gift/bookshop and library remain open year round. Delaware County Historical Association, Rt. 10, 3 miles northeast of Delhi. (607) 746-3849 dcha@delhi. net http://www.heartofthecatskills.org OCTOBER 13; 7pm: DOWN AND OUT AT THE COUNTY POORHOUSE. Widows or women abandoned by husbands were sent to poor house. Cemetery, near golf course, is evidence of sad lives of people who lived there. Sponsored by Meredith Historical Society. Former Charlotte Valley Presbyterian Church, East Meredith. Free. Refreshments served. Info (607) 746-8083. OCTOBER13; 7pm: ANSWER THE MUSE. Indie Rock with Yogic Soul. Deposi Community Theatre & PAC, 148 Front St, Deposit. 607-467-2727 OCTOBER 15; 2pm: HARVEST – a WSKG documentary film By award winning filmmaker Brian Frey. Attendees are invited to linger and meet the filmmaker, and sample produce and cheeses from our Delaware County farmers. The film, traces the history and evolution of farming and agriculture in upstate New York over six generations. It is the story of the lives and stories of farming families and the communities they built. Above all, Harvest is an oral history chronicling the life, struggles, and achievements, and most importantly, the lasting legacy of the upstate New York farming community. Walton Theatre 30 Gardiner Place, Walton , NY 13856. (607) 865-6688 October 15; 10am-5pm: Woodsmen’s Festival. Logging, sawing and woodworking history; new activities and perennial favorites. Woodsmen’s Club from SUNY Cobleskill demonstrates cross-cut sawing, overhand and underhand chop, ax throwing and other lumberjack skills. Fee. Hanford Mills Museum, 51 County Highway 12, East Meredith. http://www.hanfordmills. org/ October 15- January 6; 2-4pm: Utilitarian Art. Catskill Center, 43355 New York 28, Arkville. OCTOBER 15; 2pm: DIANE GALUSA TALK, LIQUID ASSETS. Author Diane Galush talk about new, expanded ediion of Luquid Assest: History of New York City’s Wate System. Refreshments, Free. Delaware County Historical Association, 46549 St. Hwy 10, Delhi. 607-746-3849 OCTOBER 16; 9am: BULLDOG RUN. Benefits Delaware Academy Varsity Club. Registration and sign in 9am. Race 10am. Course established Sherwood loop. Parking behind school. Delaware Academy High School, 2 Sheldon Drive, Delhi. OCTOBER 16; 11am: MEMBERSHIP MEETING. Congregation B’nai Israel, 347 Wagner Ave, Flesichmanns. Info 845-254-9945 OCTOBER 16; 10am: MUSHROOM WALK. Learn identifying and finding mushrooms in woods with Catskill Fungi’s John Michelottil Limi 20 participants. Register: 845-588-3054. Catskill Forest Association, 43469 St. Hwy 28, Arkville. October 16: Tessa Lark, Violin & Renana Gutman, Piano. Friends of Music of Stamford NY, Inc. Stamford United Methodist Church, 88 Main St, Stamford. www.friendsmusic.org OCTOBER 19; 7:30pm: CARDIFF GIANT HOAX. John Darrwo, noted impersonator, will speak. Deposit Historical Museum, 145 Second St., Deposit 607-467-4422 October 22; 7-9pm: Bombay Rickey. With their deliciously quirky blend of cowboy music, exotic dance rhythms, coloratura soprano, surf guitar, Indian, Latin, funk, and rock, Bombay Rickey might be the soundtrack to a Bollywood noir film from 1960s, or perhaps to a spaghetti western that never existed. Fee. West Kortright Centre, 49 West Kortright Church Road, East Meredith. 607-278-5454 http://westkc.org OCTOBER 22; noon: ANNUAL MEETING, LUNCHEON AND PROGRAM. “Dwon andOut at Delaware County Poorhouse” with County Historian Gabrielle Pierce. Reservations required. Mtownhistory.org. HSM Hall, 778 Cemetery Rd, Margaretville. OCTOBER 22; 7pm: BOMBAY RICKEY has unique sound evocatvie of 60’s movie soundscapes, band plays both covers and original music. West Kortright Centre, 49 West Kortright Church Road, East Meredith. 607-278-5454 OCTOBER 22;7:30am; GAME OF LOGGING LEVEL 3 focuses on techniques for handling difficult trees. Bring own chainsaw, helmet, leather boots, chaps, safety glasses or face screen, ear muffs or plugs and dress for weather. Limited to 10. Catskill Forest Association, 43469 St. Hwy 28, Arkville. 845586-3054. OCTOBER 22; 4:30pm: TURKEY & TRIMMINGS HARVEST DINNER. Serving trukey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, squash, cabbage salad, beverages and homemade pie. Take outs available. Hamden Community Hall, behind Hamden Presbyterian Church, Rte. 10 Hamdne. October 22-November 18; 2-4pm: Exhibit Opening The Wild Ones: Creatures of the Catskills. Interdisciplinary Exhibit by Bertha Rogers. Poet-Artist Bertha Rogers will be reading some of her poems and running Miniature Artist Book Workshop. Gallery open Mon - Fri 10am-4pm. Delaware County Historical Association, Rt. 10, 3 miles northeast of Delhi. (607) 746-3849 dcha@delhi. net http://www.heartofthecatskills.org OCTOBER 24; noon - 8pm: JACK-O-LANTERN JAMBOREE. Pumpkin carving, halloween party and games, twilight hayride, Dracula dance party, Jack-O-Lantern lighting and more. Maple Shade Farm, 2066 Cty. Hwy 18, Delhi. 607-746-8866 OCTOBER 28, 29; TWILIGHT LANTERN GUIDED TOUR OF 1797 GIDEON FRISBEE HOUSE. Experience guided lantern tour of historic 1797 Gideon Frisbee House. More eerie elements of the house will be highlighted, including “coffin door,” “break neck” rear stairway, and the narrow room in
5 1 2 Main Street, Delhi, NY 13753 Voice  607-746-2281 Fax  607-746-3571 www.greatwesterncatskills.com info greatwesternca...
Ray’s Fine wines & Spirits 70 Main Street, Delhi, New York 607-746-3775 which a “presence” is said to lurk. Tours leave promptly 5, 5:45 and 6:30pm. Refreshments. RSVP by Oct. 27. Delaware County Historical Association, 46549 St. Hwy 10, Delhi. 607-746-3849 OCTOBER 29; 1pm: 6TH ANNUAL HALLOWEEN PARTY. Ghoulish gathering kids party. Admission includes pizza, chili, hot dogs, popcorn, chocolate fountain, kool aid, and hay ride. Kids up to sixth grade. Masonic Hall, Front St., Deposit. OCTOBER 29; 7-11pm: 6TH ANNUAL HALLOWEEN PARTY. Monster Mash Teen Party – grades 7 and up. Admission includes pizza, chili, hot dogs, popcorn, chocolate fountain, punch an DJ DeRue. 10:30 – 11pm Halloween Mayhem. Bring own shave cream, toilet paper, flour sacks, or silly string and we will have are where you can use them. Masonic Hall, Front St., Deposit. November 4 - December 18: Community Art Show. A Celebration of Local Art and Artists. Opening Reception: Saturday, November 5th, 2-4 pm. MURAL on Main, 631 Main Street, Hobart. (607)538-3002 muralonmain@ gmail.com November 5; 3-4pm: Harmony singing workshop with the Bumper Jacksons. Introduction to Harmony Singing workshop with the founders of Bumper Jacksons! West Kortright Centre, 49 West Kortright Church Road, East Meredith. 607-278-5454 http://westkc.org November 5; 7-9pm: Bumper Jacksons. Fee. West Kortright Centre, 49 West Kortright Church Road, East Meredith. 607-278-5454 http:// westkc.org November 6; 1pm: Annual Meeting at DCHA. Annual Meeting, Pot Luck Lunch and Award of Merit presentation. To attend Pot Luck Lunch, please bring side dish or dessert to pass. Ham and turkey provided. Presentation to be announced. Open to general public. Free admission. Delaware County Historical Association, Rt. 10, 3 miles northeast of Delhi. (607) 746-3849 dcha@ delhi.net http://www.heartofthecatskills.org November 12; 2pm: Gustafar Yellowgold. Fee. Roxbury Arts Center, 5025 Vega Mountain Road, Roxbury. 607-326-7908 NOVEMBER 12; 7pm: I WAS THERE IN ’67. Play about Vietnam performed by Presentarts in honor of Veterans Day. Deposit Community Theatre & PAC, 148 Front St., Deposit 607-467-2727 NOVEMBER 12, 13; CRAFTSKILLS. Live music while shopping for local crafts, food and spirits. Bovina Town Hall, 1866 County Highway 6, Bovina Center. 607-832-4302 NOVEMBER 18; 2pm: HIGH END AUCTION begins with a tour of Bundy House at noon followed by refreshments in museum. Auction 2pm. Sponsored by Deposit Historical Society. Deposit Historical Museum, 145 Second St., Deposit. 607-467-4422. November 19-January 7: Small Works. Opening Reception November 19; 4-6pm. Roxbury Arts Center, 5025 Vega Mountain Road, Roxbury. 607-326-7908 November 20: Amphion String Quartet. Friends of Music of Stamford NY, Inc. Stamford United Methodist Church, 88 Main St, Stamford. www.friendsmusic.org NOVEMBER 26; 6pm: CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTING. After lighting go across street in State Theatre for hot chocolate, cookies and puppet show. Enjoy sounds of Christmas Music and watch tree sparkle with lights. Memorial Field & State Theatre, 148 Front St., Deposit. DCEMBER 3; 11am: O’CONNOR HOSPITAL HOLIDAY PARADE. Open house a hospital following. Main St., Delhi. December 3; 10am-4pm: Holiday Shopping at DCHA. Monday Friday’s. Features extensive offering of books on local history and, numerous locally produced craft items, including blown glass ornaments, and knitted items. Delaware County Historical Association, Rt. 10, 3 miles northeast of Delhi. (607) 746-3849 dcha@delhi.net http://www.heartofthecatskills.org December 3; 11am-3pm: Holiday for the Heart. Fundraising Christmas Tree Decorating. Come see decorated trees and take chance to win one. Relax and listen to live entertainment. Fee. Delaware County Historical Association, Rt. 10, 3 miles northeast of Delhi. (607) 746-3849 dcha@delhi. net http://www.heartofthecatskills.org December 3; 11am-5pm: Local Arts Market. Shop local arts this holiday season. Roxbury Arts Center, 5025 Vega Mountain Road, Roxbury. 607-326-7908 December 4: Annual Holiday Concert. Friends of Music of Stamford NY, Inc. Stamford United Methodist Church, 88 Main St, Stamford. www.friendsmusic.org DECEMBER 10; 7pm: CHRISTMAS VARIETY SHOW. Four of Hearts, Stewarts Dept. Store 85 Main Street Delhi, NY 13753 607-746-2254 Father Dan and accompanist with audience participation. Deposit Community Theatre & PAC, 148 Front St, Deposit. 607-467-2727 DECEMBER 10; 10am: DEER CUTTING DEMONSTRATION. Learn how to properly process deer. Pre-registrations required. Catskill Forest Association, 43469 St. Hwy 28, Arkville. 845-586-3054 museums and other attractions Covered Bridges are reminders of life in the 19th century. Rte 10, Delhi; Rte 10, Hamden; Rte 206, Downsville Catskill Center for Conservation and Development, Inc. Arkville 845-586-2611 catskill community players Hobart 607-652-7514 Colchester Historical Society Downsville 607-363-2212 community chorale of catskills Roxbury 607-326-4692 delaware county historical society Delhi 607-746-3849 Delaware & Ulster Rail Ride Arkville 1-800-225-4132 delhi art group Walton. 607-829-8787 deposit community theatre Deposit 607-467-2269 deposit historical society Deposit 607-467-4422 erpf cultural institute Arkville 845-586-2611 franklin stock company Franklin 607-829-3700 hanford mills museum East Meredith 607-278-5744 Hancock Library & Historical Museum 607-637-2519 honest brook music festival Delhi 607-746-3770 hunting tavern Andes 845-676-3238 John Burroughs Memorial State Historic Site Rte 30 Roxbury. little victory players Downsville 607-363-2819 Meredith Historical Society www.meredithhistory.org 607-746-8083 OPEN EYE THEATRE Margaretville 845-586-1660 Maple Shade Farm, 2066 County Highway 18, Delhi, NY 607-746-8866 mapleshadefarmny.com mt. utsayantha regional arts Stamford 607-652-7927 Round Barn Historic Site Rt. 30 Halcottsville roxbury arts group Roxbury 607-326-7908 State University of Technology at Delhi Delhi 607-746-4540 the open eye theatre Roxbury 607-326-4986 tri-town theatre 607-639-8200 walton little theatre Walton 607-865-5274 west kortright centre West Kortright 607-278-5454 WOODCHUCK LODGE Burroughs Memorial Road, Roxbury roxburyny.com word thursday & New bright hill center Treadwell 607746-7306 For more information on events, contact: Greene County Visitor Center Department, 700 Rte. 23B, Leeds, NY 12451 or call 518-943-3223 or 1-800-355-2287 www.greatnortherncatskills.com SEPTEMBER 24 thru OCTOBER 16; HUNTER MOUNTAIN OKTOBERFEST. Every Saturday and Sunday. Featuring the Gestalt BMW Automobile Rally, colors in the Catskills Motorcycle Rally, Daus Lufwerk Eurocar Rally, Farmers Market and Wine Tasting and more. Rte. 23A,m Hunter. 800-4888376 OCTOBER 8, Nov. 12, Dec 10, Jan 14, Feb 11, March 11, April 8, May 13; 5pm: 2ND SATURDAY STROLL. Shops, galleries and restaurants host special events and entertainment on second Saturdya of each month. Sponsored by HOCA. 518-943-0989. Main St. Catskill. OCTOBER 15, Nov. 19, Dec 17, Jan 21, Feb 18, March 18, April 15, May 20; 6pm: SATURDAY STUDIOS. Network, look at art, have good
Ray   s Fine wines   Spirits 70 Main Street, Delhi, New York 607-746-3775 which a    presence    is said to lurk. Tours le...
convesation. Mingle with an artist or friend, listen to discussion, and expand your collection of art. Many galleries, shops and restaurants open. Main Street Galleries, Catskill 518-943-0380 THROUGH OCTOBER 30; THOMAS COLE: The Artist as Architect. Exhibition focuses on Thomas Cole’s architectural interests through archtectural elements in his paintings and drawings as well as in both his realized and visionary projecs. Housed in Cole’s self-designed Italianate studio. Galley Hours: Tues – Sun 9:30am – 5pm. Thomas Cole National Historic Site, 218 Spring St., Catskill. 518-943-7465 Through November 6: Guided group landscape tours. Along Olana’s carriage roads via open-air electric vehicle and on foot, and self-guided version available through downloadable app. Integrated work of art, architecture, conservation, agriculture and landscape design and take visitor to key locations in Olana’s landscape. The Olana Partnership, 5720 State Route 9G, Hudson. 518-828-1872 www.olana.org OCTOBER 8; 6-8PM: Great Pumpkin Walk & Lighting. Bring your best carved pumpkin and candle to Go Greene Car Wash/Sunoco 6360 Rt. 23 A, Tannersville and enter in our Pumpkin Walk & Lighting. OCTOBER 8; HIKEFEST KAATERSKILL RAIL TRAIL and the Falls. Exciting things happening since we explored Rail Trail and falls last year. MTHS does not require membership for hike participations, but require everyone register by calling 518-589-6657.Mountain Top Historical Society, Rte. 23A, Haines Falls. OCTOBER 8; HUDSON ATHENS LIGHTHOUSE TOURS. Short boat ride brings visitors to exploe two story family dwelling with many points of interest. Spiral staircases and a working fog bell with clock work mechanism are quite experience. Tours 11:30am, 12:30 pm, 1:30 pm & 22:30pm. Hudson Athens Lighthouse, Water Street, Athens. OCTOBER 8; 10 - 5PM: LEYLA MCCALLA TRIO. Deeply influenced by traditional Creole, Cajun and Haitian music, as well as by American jazz and folk, her music is at once earthy, elegant, soulful and witty it vibrates with three centuries of history, yet also feels strikingly fresh, distinctive and contemporary. Doctorow Center For The Arts Hunter, NY OCTOBER 8; 10 - 5PM: Windham’s 22nd Annual Autumn Affair. Townwide fall festival celebrating all things fall. Food, vendors, kids activities, and more. Windham. October 8; 2&5pm: Hudson Valley Dance Festival. Worldclass dancers, dance companies and choreographers. Attend matinee or early evening performance. Produced by and benefits Dancers Responding to AIDS, a program of Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS. Fee. The Historic Catskill Point, 1 Main Street, Catskill. 212-840-0770 dradance.org OCTOBER 8,9; 10am: APPLE HARVEST FESTIVAL. Craft and food vendors, apples, pumpkin painting and other children’s activities, live music and bake sale. Angelo Canna Town Park, Mountain Ave., Cairo OCTOBER 8, 9; 11AM - 6:15PM: DAS LAUFWERK EUROCAR RALLY. All European cars are welcome! Bands, Family Fun, Food & beverages, uncrowded roads, Automotive vendors, Artists/crafts vendors. Skyride and Zip line will be open. Free admission! Hunter Mountain, Hunter, New York 12442 www.huntermtn.com OCTOBER 8 - 10; SWAP SALE Gather your lightly used clothing and equipment* for the annual Swap Sale! Drop off items that you’d like to swap at the Retail Shop (starting Saturday, October 1st). If your items are sold during the sale, you will receive credit that can be used in the Retail Shop, Board Room, or Repair Shop. Your items will be available to the public until October 18th. After that, you can either pick them up or they will be dontated. Hunter Mountain, Hunter, New York 12442 www.huntermtn.com OCTOBER 8 -16; EXPRESSIVE VISIONS An Exhibition of new paintings by Jonathan Wilner and Laura Leigh. Opening reception Saturday October 8 at 11 AM to 6PM William P. Duffy Fine Art 5981 Main Street, Tannersville, N. Y OCTOBER 9,10; DIAMONDBACK MOTOCROSS at Weldon House. Diamondback uphill triple, high speed sections, fast-sweeping start, table tops, doubles and more. All day. 2119 Rte. 145, East Durham. 634-2541 October 12-16, 20-23; 7:30pm: FRANKENSTEIN: THE MODERN PROMETHEUS. Mary Shelley’s tale of terror gets tour-de-force treatment in Jim Helsinger’s stunning adaptation for a single performer. Fee. bridgest.org Bridge Street Theater, 44 West Bridge Street, Catskill. 518-943-3818 October 13; 8pm: Jazz Masters from the Piano Performance Museum. Fee. Piano Performance Center, Doctorow Center for the Arts, 7971 Main Street, Hunter. 518-263-2063 www.catskillmtn.org OCTOBER 13, 22, 23; 7:30pm-9:30pm: FRANKENSTEIN: THE MODERN PROMETHEUS. A heart-stopping Halloween treat! Bridge St. Theatre, Catskill, NY OCTOBER 15; 4PM: MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION OF COLUMBIA AND GREENE COUNTIES 10TH ANNUAL PUMPKIN WALK Family Entertainment and more will begin at 4:00 PM, followed at 6:00 PM by the popular Pumpkin Walk. Take a stroll along a magical path of lit jack-olanterns artistically carved by children and artists from our community – a great family activity. For more info go to our website: www.mhacg.org To purchase tickets in advance call 828-4619 ext. 302 or at Mental Health Assoc 713 Union CHEESE BARREL & GOURMET SHOP 800 Main Street, Margaretville, NY 845-586-4666 www.cheesebarrel.com Street, Hudson NY between 9-5 Monday-Thursday or 9-4 on Friday and pick up tickets at the front desk. Columbia-Greene Community College 4400 State Route 23 Hudson, OCTOBER 15; 11am: GOLF TOURNAMENT. Athens Fire Dept will hold four person scramble golf tournament. 518-634-2035 to register. Thunderhart Golf Course, 2740 Cty Rte. 67 Freehold. OCTOBER 15, 5:30pm: ZADOCK PRATT MUSEUM GALA. Hors d’oeuvres 5:30pm, dinner 6:30pm. Eight county residents whose work has contributed significantly to interpreting and preserving Greene County history will be honored. Club at Windham Mountain, 19 Resort Drive, Windham. 518-299-3258 OCT. 15-16: WINE TASTING & FARMER’S MARKET - Local wineries, farms, and artisans come to the mountain to celebrate the last weekend of Oktoberfest. Hunter Mountain, Hunter, New York 12442 www.huntermtn.com OCT. 15-16: FMX AERIAL STUNT SHOWS - Keith Sayers will bring his incredibly talented team of aerial riders to perform a series of high-flying aerial stunt shows at the base of Hunter Mountain, powered by Monster Energy. Hunter Mountain, Hunter, New York 12442 www.huntermtn.com OCTOBER 21, 23; SPIRITUAL SIDE OF DUKE. Percussionist John Lumkin will lead a school visit in which he teaches elementary students the essential qualities of jazz standards. Following educational work, Lumpkin and his group will leand an evening lecture for general audiences, concert at deer Mountain Inn and free performance at KUMC. 6094 Main St., Tannersville. 845-489-4857 OCTOBER 22; 3:30PM: THE PUPPET PEOPLE: The Wizard of Oz. Join The Puppet People as they follow the yellow brick road to The Emerald City and beyond in the magical Land of Oz and bring to life this literary classic! Doctorow Center For The Arts Hunter, NY OCTOBER 22; noon: THE HAUNTING. 1963 film. This book to film presentation will be introduced by Carolyn Bennett. Free. Mountain Cinema, 7971 Main St., Hunter OCTOBER 22; 7PM: GALA ART EXHIBITION AND LIVE AUCTION. Featuring Art in All Media & Price Range. Wine & Cheese, Hors D’ oeuvres, Cake & Coffee, 50/50 Raffle, Door Prize. Preview 6PM. For Tickets and Information Call:Delores Mazzola 518 966-0320 St. John the Baptist’s Church Hall 4987 State Rt. 81 Greenville, NY 12083 OCOBER 29; 10am: 5K RUN/WALK. Sponsored by Cairo-Durham Teachers’ Association to benefit scholarship fund. Register send name, email, phone number and whether you plan to run or walk to VHNelson@gmail.com Angelo Canna Town Park, Mountain Ave., Cairo OCTOBER 29; A GREAT SORROW. Early American funeral. Tours begin 4:30pm and 5:30pm. Brock Museum, 90 County 42, Coxsackie, 518-7316490. OCTOBER 30; 2-4PM: HISTORICAL TOUR & RECEPTION. Begin with a guided tour of the house, followed by light refreshments and informal presentations and discussion with the current innkeepers, descendants of the original owners of the home, and local historians. There will be historic photographs and documents on display, and attendees with personal connections to the house are encouraged to bring any similar items they’d like to share. Attendees will also have the chance to stroll the five-acre wooded property and (weather depending) partake in horseshoes and other traditional lawn games, or simply enjoy the mountain views from the front porch. Direct descendants of the Ford and Jacobs families are specially invited to spend the night on Sunday at no charge, on a first come first served basis, while rooms are available, and others wishing to stay overnight can mention the event when booking to receive a 25% discount. Catskill Lodge 350 State Route 296 Windham, NY 12496 518-261-7150 NOVEMBER 4; THANKSGIVING DINNER. Hope Restoration Chuch, 117 Rte. 296, Windham. NOVEMBER 5,6; THIRD ANNUAL THOMAS COLE ART SHOW. Religious Art in Hudson River Style, original artwork in traditional and contemporary syle and photography. St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 50 William St., Catskill. NOVEMBER 4, 5, 6; AHIMSA Yoga & Music Festival promotes traditional and emerging yoga styles, provides beautiful music in a green setting and educates consumers by spotlighting innovations in yoga in New York City’s secluded backyard – the Catskills Mountains. The founders of AHIMSA Yoga and Music Festival have brought together two experiences, music and yoga, to create a single event that will last a lifetime. Buying power, conscious, curious and social: the wellness niche that gather at The AHIMSA Yoga and Music Festival, yogis and music enthusiasts alike, are ideal for your healthy living brand. Inspire an experience, connect live and encourage instant engagement. For information, http://ahimsayogafestival.com/ Route 23A Hunter, NY 12442. 518 263-4223 NOVEMBER 8; 11am: ELECTION DAY DINNER. Lexington/Westkill
convesation. Mingle with an artist or friend, listen to discussion, and expand your collection of art. Many galleries, sho...
United Methodist Church, 54 County Rte. 13A, Lexington. NOVEMBER 12; 7:30pm: CINDERELLA, New York Theatre Ballet. Orpheum Film & Performing Arts Center, 6050 Main St., Tannersville. www. catskillmtn.org NOVEMBER 12, 13; CHILLY WILLY WINTER’S EVE TOUR. Cold season tour with costumed guide. Tours at 11am, 1pm, 3pm each day. Bronck Museum, 90 County 42, Coxsackie. 518-731-6490 NOVEMBER 26; 8pm: WINDHAM FESTIVAL CHAMBER ORCHESTRA. Doctorow Center For The Arts Hunter, NY December 3; 4:30PM - 6PM: Holiday Celebration. Visit with Santa and his elves, toys, balloons and magic for all, enjoy a horse drawn carriage ride. Followed by our Annual Tree Lighting and Christmas Caroling at 6PM at Windham Civic Center 5379 St. Rte. 23, Windham. DECEMBER 4, 5; 7pm: SCROOGE & SON or THE LAST SPIRIT. Dec. 6, 2pm. Orpheum Film & Performing Arts Center, 6050 Main St., Tannersville. www.catskillmtn.org DECEMBER 9, 10, 11; THE NUTCRACKER. Catskill Mountain Foundation, in partnership with Valentina Kozlova, Victoria Rinaldi, and Margo Sappington, presents second annual production. Fee. Tickets available at www.catskillmtn. org. Orpheum Film & Performaning Arts Center 6050 Main St., Tannersville. DECEMBER 8,9,10,11,15,16,17,18; HOLIDAY MEMORIES During the depths of the Great Depression, a lonely 7-year-old boy and his elderly cousin forge an unbreakable friendship. Russell Vandenbroucke’s brilliant stage adaptation of stories by Truman Capote is an ode to the simple joys of love shared, a touching chronicle of growing up “different” in the Deep South, and a terrific alternative to more traditional seasonal fare. This Kaliyuga Arts production is directed by John Sowle. “Pay-What-You-Can” preview Dec 8. Runs ThursdaysSaturdays at 7:30pm and Sundays at 2:00pm until Dec 18. Tickets are $20, $10 for patrons 21 and under, and can be purchased at BrownPaperTickets.com or by calling 800-838-3006. For more information, visit BridgeSt.org or call 518943-3818. 44 Bridge St. Catskill NY DECEMBER 10; ATHENS ANNUAL VICTORIAN STROLL. Contemporary arts and performances galore, roving carolers dressed in Victorian garb, Victorian Santa, horse-drawn trolleys, annual holiday concert by CoxsackieAthens Community Band, live music performances, arts and crafts vendors, children’s holiday cottage contest, historic open houses, ice sculpture carving, cookies, hot chocolate, wine tasting, food specials at local restaurants, house decorating contest, caricaturist, face painting, chocolate fountain and more. Evening bonfire, caroling and tree lighting in Riverfront Park 5pm. 24 Second Street, Athens.945-2136 DECEMBER 10; noon: THE BISHOP’S WIFE. 1947 film. Book to film presentation. Free. Mountain Cinema, 7971 Main St. Windahm. DECEMBER 13; 7:30pm: CONCERT: THE CATSKILL GLEE CLUB winter concert. Variety of traditional, classical nad contemporary holiday favorites. First Reformed Church, Main St, Catksill. 518-755-9024. museums and other attractions ART GALLERY AT THE ATHENS CULTURAL CENTER. Main Street, Athens. www.athensculturalcenter.org Bear Creek Landing Family Sport Complex, Hunter. 518-263-3839. Bronck house Museum, Coxsackie 518-731-6490. Catskill Mountain Foundation, Hunter. 518-263-4908 Durham Center Museum, Route 145, East Durham. 518-239-8461 Greene Council on the Arts, P.O.B. 463, 398 Main St.,Catskill. 518-943-3400 www.greenearts.org. Mountain Top historical society Rt. 23A Haines Falls Horton By the Stream, Elka Park. 518-589-5383. Hudson-Athens Lighthouse Preservation Society, Athens 518- 828-5294. HUNTER FOUNDATION ASTER HOUSE, Tannersville. 518-5899500 IRISH CULTURAL CENTER, East Durham. 518-634-2286 Mahayana Buddhist Temple, South Cairo. 518-622-3619 RIVERSIDE FARMER’S & ARTISAN’S MARKET At historic Catskill Point. Every Sunday thru Oct 29. 9:30 - 1:30 PM. 518-943-3400 The Mountain Top Arboretum, Tannersville. 518-589-3093 Thomas Cole House, Catskill, NY 518-943-7465 Ukrainian Church, Rte. 23A, Hunter. 518-734-5330 Vedder Memorial Research Library, at the Bronck House, Coxsackie, NY. 518-731-1033 Zadock Pratt Museum/Pratt Rock, Prattsville. 518-299-3395. ZOOM FLUME Shady Glen Rd., Durham 518-239-4559 www.zoomflume.com Otsego County Tourism 242 Main Street, Oneonta, NY www.thisiscooperstown.com THRU OCTOBER 21; FACULTY ART EXHIBIT. Mon – Fri 11am – 5pm. Martin Mullen Art Gallery, SUNY Oneonta, Oneonta. Info 607-4363456 THRU OCTOBER 31; FARMING’S NEW ERA: FROM FIELD TO TABLE in NYS. Learn where, how, and why food is grown and how it makes it to stores and plates. NYS products and crops such as dairy, beef, apples, and hops used to follow food from farms to table. Tues. – Sun. 10am – 4pm. Closed Mon. Farmers’ Museum, 5775 S. Rte. 80, Cooperstown. 607547-1450 or 888-547-1450 THRU DECEMBER 31; HAMILTON’S FINAL ACT. View lettes between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr that led to the eventual confrontation in Weehawken, NJ. Museum possesses 34 original documents relating to the events. Hours thru Dec. 31 Tues – Sun 10am – 4pm. Closed Mondays, Thanksgiving and Christmas. Fenimore Art Museum, 5798 St. Hwy 80, Cooperstown. THRU OCTOBER 31; 10AM-4PM: HYDE HALL MANSION TOURS. Leave from Tin Top Visitor Center every hour throughout the day. Fee. 607547-5098 www.hydehall.org Hyde Hall, 267 Glimmerglass State Park Road, Springfield. SEPTEMBER 17 - NOVEMBER 5; 4-6pm: ONEONTA & AVIATION HISTORY RECEPTION The Greater Oneonta Historical Society will host a reception for its current exhibit, “Oneonta & Aviation History” The reception follows the day’s activities at the Oneonta Municipal Airport on the 50th anniversary of the opening of the airport. Admission is free and open to the public. The exhibit describes Oneonta’s storied aviation history from the hot air balloons at Oneonta’s Central New York Fair in the 19th century to the two NASA astronauts - David Low and Ron Garan -who learned to fly in Oneonta. Visitors will also learn about Oneonta’s early pilots, Sherman Fairchild’s national contributions to aviation, and, of course, the history of the Oneonta Municipal Airport. For more information, contact 607-432-0960 or info@OneontaHistory.org. Oneonta History Center, 183 Main Street. OCTOBER 8; 1PM: TRAIN ROBBERIES. Travel back in time to world of Outlaws and The Wild West! The train is carrying a strong box full to the brim with money and the local Outlaw Gang knows it. Fee. Food and Beverages sold on board. Reservations Encouraged but Not Required. (607) 432-2429 LRHS, Milford Depot, 136 East Main Street, Milford SEPTEMBER 24-OCTOBER 9, 10; 1PM: FALL FOLIAGE TRAINS. Sat and Sun. Through farm fields and forests with colorful foliage. Fee. Reservations Encouraged. Food and beverages for sale. LRHS, Milford Depot, 136 East Main Street, Milford OCTOBER 6, Nov3, Dec 1, jan 5, March 2, A;pril 6, May 4; 7:30pm: THE MERRYMAKERS LIVE FOLK MUSIC. Merrymakers perform Appalachain, Irish and Israeli Folk music. Free tea and sweet treats. Bring instrument if you like. Free to join. Yellow Deli, 134 Main St., Oneonta. 607-431-1155. OCTOBER 7-23; EXHIBITION DAVID ANDREE & THERESA DEVINE. Solo exhibition exploring conversations of artwork within the tradition of landscape, through the use of painting, drawing, sculpture, video nad sound. Gallery hours Thurs – Fri. 2-6pm, Sat, Sun, 11am-3pm. CANO, Wilber Mansion, 11 Ford Ave, Oneonta. 607-432-2070 OCTOBER 7 – NOV. 2; OAKROOM ARTISTS LUCK OF THE DRAW. Mon – Sat 11am –4pm. Sun 1-4pm. Cooperstown Art Association, 22 Main St, Cooperstown 607-547-9777 OCTOBER 7-29; 6-8:30PM: HYDE AND SHRIEK! Candlelight Ghost Tours. Fridays and Saturdays. Visit places in Mansion where ghostly manifestations reported over 150 years. Tricks and treats for Halloween! Fee. 607-547-5098. www.hydehall.org Hyde Hall, 267 Glimmerglass State Park Road, Springfield. OCTOBER 8; COOPTOBERFEST. Family friendly activities, games, ven-
United Methodist Church, 54 County Rte. 13A, Lexington. NOVEMBER 12  7 30pm  CINDERELLA, New York Theatre Ballet. Orpheum ...
dors, into evening with the inaugural Cooperstown on Tap featuring sampling of NY craft beers and ciders. All day. Main Street, Cooperstown. Info including list of beers and ciders, vendors and bands www.CooperstownOnTap.com OCTOBER 8,9; 10am -4pm: FLY CREEK CIDER FEST. observe cider making and samples. 288 Goose Street, Fly Creek. OCTOBER 8, 9; 10am - 5pm: TRACTOR FEST at the Farmers Museum. Learn about the world of tractors and activities they powered on NY farms. See classic tractors and new tractors, small engines and other machinery. 5775 St. Hwy 80, Cooperstown. OCTBOER 10; 9am: MIDDLEFIELD ANNUAL FALL FESTIVAL & Craft Show. Crafts, seasonal products, music, children’s activities and ghost stories. District #1 Schoolhouse will be open to unveil TMHA’s newest exhibits. Old Middlefield Schoolhouse, Co. Hwy 35, Middlefield. OCTOBER 13; 6:30pm: MUSIC ON THE MANSION. Half hour open mic session for solo and small ensemble vocalists and musicians followed by 15 minute intermission with refreshments available followed by guest performer. CANO, Wilber Mansion, 11 Ford Ave, Oneonta 607-432-2070. OCTOBER 15; 1PM: PUMPKIN PATCH TRAIN. Fun and games for family. One pumpkin per child included in ticket price. Fee. LRHS, Milford Depot, 136 East Main Street, Milford OCTOBER 20; 7:30pm: WRITERS SALON – MICHAEL BLAINE. Begins with open mic, encouraging guests to read personal works. Followed by presentation from featured author. Free. CANO, Wilber Mansion, 11 Ford Ave Oneonta. 607-432-2070 OCTOBER 21, 22, 28, 29; 5:30-8PM: THINGS THAT GO BUMP IN THE NIGHT. An Eerie Lantern-Lit Tour of the Museum. Experience Farmers’ Museum during most haunting time of year. Join museum guides through shadowy grounds and recount many mysteries and ghostly happenings that occurred in Museum’s historic village. Fee. Farmer’s Museum, 5775 NY-80, Cooperstown. (607) 547-1450 OCTOBER 22; MATT LORENZ one man band. First Presbyterian Church Cooperstown. For more info www.cooperstownconcertseries.org OCTOBER 22; 12:55pm: METROPOLITAN OPERA LIVE in HD SERIES. Don Giovanni shown. Tickets avail at door or 607-431-2080. Foothills Performing Arts & Civic Center Production Center, 24 Market St, Oneonta. OCTOBER 29; 11AM: COOP LOOP 5K RUN & WALK. Moderately difficult course travels roads. Run or walk in Halloween costume for chance to win prizes! Clark Sports Center, 124 County Highway 52, Cooperstown. 607-547-2800 OCTOBER 30; 6pm: PUMPKIN GLOW: JACK-O’-LANERN. Pumpkin drop off 1-4pm. Glow 6-7pm. Cooperstown Art Association, 22 Main St., Cooperstown. 607-547-9777 OCTOBER 30; 6pm. THE CAPITOL STEPS. No matter who or what is in the headlines, you can bet the Capitol Steps will tackle both sides of the political spectrum and all things equally foolish. Doors open 5:30pm, show 6pm. Foothills Performing Arts & Civic Center Production Center, 24 Market St., Oneonta OCTOBER 31; 3pm: HALLOWEEN CELEBRATION. Children in costume and parents/guardians will receive free admission on halloween and can experience a trick-or-treat adventure thru the Hall of Fame Plaque Gallery. National Baseball Hall of Fame, 25 Main St., Cooperstown. NOVEMBER 4; 7:30pm: NAREK ARUTYUNAN, Clarinet, and YUNCHIN ZHOU, Piano. Two first prize winners of the Young Concert Artists International auditions who have performed extensively here and abroad. First United Methodist Church, 66 Chestnut St, Oneonta NOVEMBER 4, Dec. 2, Feb 3, March 3, April 7, May 5; 8pm: CONTRADANCE BY OTSEGO DANCE SOCIETY. Traditional New England dance form tha is easy to learn. All ages welcome, no experience, since all dances are taught. Presbyterian Church, 25 Church St., Cooperstown. 607-95-8232 NOVEMBER 5; 9am - 5pm: CONFERENCE OF FOOD AND FARMING. Informs and inspires farmers and public, unifying and driving the agricultural economy in Central NY. Free. 5775 St. Hwy 80, Cooperstown. NOVEMBER 6; 5pm: COLLIN RAYE – A Tribute to the Veterans. With 24 top ten records, this performer remains one of the great voices of our time. Foothills Performing Arts & Civic Center Production Center, 24 Market St., Oneonta NOVEMBER 7 – Dec 20; SUE COE EXHIBIT. Mon – Fri 11am – 5pm. Martin Mullen Art Gallery. SUNY Oneonta, Oneonta. 607-436-3456 NOVEMBER 10-14; GLIMMEGLASS FILM DAYS. Narratvie films, feature documentaries, shorts, local food and drink, walks, filmmaker talks, art exhibits, restaurant specials and more. Program of Otsego 2000, an environmental and preservation advocacy non-profit in Cooperstown. Various locations, streets, Cooperstown. NOVEMBER 11, 12; 10am HOLIDAY BAZAAR. Lunch available. The Major’s Inn, 104 Marion Ave,. Gilbertsville. 607-783-2967 NOVEMBER 11-23; HOLIDAY SHOW & SALE. Opening reception Nov. 11 5-7-m. Mon. – Sat. 11am – 4pm, Sun 1-4pm. Cooperstown Art Association, 22 Main St., Cooperstown. 607-547-9777 Blue Bee Café 114 Main ~ Delhi ~ 607-746-8000 NOVEMBER 25 - 26; 10am - 4pm: THANKSGIVING AT THE FARM. Traditional Thanksgiving food prepared overthe open hearth at the rustic Lippitt Farmhouse; unusual 19th century digestive medicines created at Dr. Thrall’s Pharmacy; blacksmith-created kitechen utensils used in teh 1840’s and more. Fee. 5775 St. Hwy 80, Coopertown. NOVEMBER 25, 26, DECEMBER 3, 4, 10, 11, 17; 2PM: SANTA EXPRESSES. Celebrate Holiday Season with Santa and his helpers. Fee. Reservations and Prepayment Required. (607) 432-2429 LRHS, Milford Depot, 136 East Main Street, Milford NOVEMBER 26; FRONT COUNTRY. Started as a group of friends playing bluegrass in San Francisco’s Mission District has morphed into a touring powerhouse of song and sound, transcending their humble string band roots. Otesaga Resort Hotel, Cooperstown. For more info www.cooperstownconcertseries.org NOVEMBER 27; 10AM-4:30PM: ADORN-A-DOOR: WREATH FESTIVAL. Silent auction of holiday wreaths donated by local artists, artisans and businesses. Cooperstown Art Association, 22 Main Street, Cooperstown. 607-547-9777 www.cooperstownart.com DECEMBER 3; 3PM: ROCKIN’ AROUND COOPERSTOWN UGLY SWEATER RUN AND WALK. Venture through historic Cooperstown and encourage patrons to shop and eat local, while visiting Santa’s home. Register at www.clarksportscenter.com Main Street, Cooperstown DECEMBER 3, 10; 6:30PM: CHRISTMAS LIGHTS TRAINS. Fee. Reservations Required. (607) 432-2429 LRHS, Milford Depot, 136 East Main Street, Milford DECEMBER 10; 3-7pm: CANDLIGHT EVENING at the Farmers Museum. Museum decoratedin greenery and illuminated by hundreds of candles. Ride through the Museum’s grounds in wagons pulled by draft horses with jingle bells, children holdiay ars and crafts activities, visit with Saint Nicholas, ride teh Empire State Carousel, free rides courtesy of matt Sohns and family, complimentary wassail, warmed in kettles over open fires, bonfire on the Tavern Green, 5775 St. Hwy 80, Cooperstown. DECEMBER 10; noon: CUSTOMER APPRECIATION DAY. Over 30 spirit vendors. Best Wine & Spirits, Price Chopper Plaza, Rte 7, Oneonta. 607-432-4144 DECEMBER 10; 12:55p,m: L’AMOUR DE LOIN will be shown. Tickets at door or 607-431-2080. Foothills Performing Arts & Civic Center Production Center, 24 Market St., Oneonta DECEMBER 16-18; A CHRISTMAS CAROL. Classic tale of one loney man who learns the true meaning of Christmas. Produced in house by Glimmer Globe Theatre. Fee. Farmers Museum, 5775 St. Hwy 80, Cooperstown. DECEMBER 17; DARLING SIDE. Harmonies the critics compare them to Crosby, Stills & Nash. Darlingside has emerges as an indie fold band to be reckoned with. Otesaga Resort Hotel, Cooperstown. For more info www. cooperstownconcertseries.org JANUARY 7; 12:55pm. NABUCCO will be shown. Tickets at door or 607431-2080. Foothills Performing Arts & Civic Center Production Center, 24 Market St., Oneonta JANUARY 18- Feb 17; LOCAL HEROES EXHIBIT. Mon – Fri. 11am – 5pm. Project Space Gallery, SUNY Oneonta, Oneonta 607-432-3456. JANUARY 21; 12:55pm: ROMEO ET JULIETTE will be shown. Tickets at door or 607-431-2080. Foothills Performing Arts & Civic Center Production Center, 24 Market St., Oneonta JANUARY 21; THE YOUNG NOVELISTS. Through their rich but rustic sound, Toronto roots-rock outfit Teh Young Novelists deliver a dose of honesty in audible form. Ripe with raw but elegant instrumentation and stacked multi-layered harmonies, their pure take on folk-tinged rock translates equally well from the stereo or stage. Otesaga Resort Hotel, Cooperstown. For more info www.cooperstownconcertseries.org JANUARY 23- March 17; PARISI AND DAVIS EXHIBIT. Mon – Fri. 11am – 5pm. Project Space Gallery, SUNY Oneonta, Oneonta 607-432-3456. FEBRUARY 4; ANNIE & THE HEDONISTS. Covering an eclectic mix of acoustic blues, vintage jazz and swing, and folk roots Americana. Otesaga Resort Hotel, Cooperstown. For more info www.cooperstownconcertseries. org FEBRUARY 25; 12:55pm: RUSALKA will be shown. Tickets at door or 607-431-2080. Foothills Performing Arts & Civic Center Production Center, 24 Market St., Oneonta MARCH 3; 7:30pm: ROOP VERMA. Roop Verma (Sitar), with Naren Budhakar (Tabla), Arjun Verma (Sitar), and Tracy Verma (Tamboura) will perform Indian Classical music. Goodrich Theate, SUNY Oneonta, Fine Arts Building, Ravine Parkway, Oneonta MARCH 11; 12:55pm: LA TRAVIATA JULIETTE will be shown. Tickets at door or 607-431-2080. Foothills Performing Arts & Civic Center Produc-
dors, into evening with the inaugural Cooperstown on Tap featuring sampling of NY craft beers and ciders. All day. Main St...
Stitch Witch Embroidery - Printing - Transfers - Sublimation 1068 County Highway 2 DeLancey, NY 13752 607-746-7308 tion Center, 24 Market St., Oneonta MARCH 11; WILLIE NILE. From the Who to Bruce Springsteen, Nile’s rock fans are legion and why not? Nile has produced classic work since his 1980 debut. Otesaga Resort Hotel, Cooperstown. For more info www.cooperstownconcertseries.org MARCH 25; 12:55pm: IDOMENEO JULIETTE will be shown. Tickets at door or 607-431-2080. Foothills Performing Arts & Civic Center Production Center, 24 Market St., Oneonta APRIL 22; 12:55pm: EUGENE ONEGIN JULIETTE will be shown. Tickets at door or 607-431-2080. Foothills Performing Arts & Civic Center Production Center, 24 Market St., Oneonta MAY 13; 12:30pm: DER ROSENKAVALIER JULIETTE will be shown. Tickets at door or 607-431-2080. Foothills Performing Arts & Civic Center Production Center, 24 Market St., Oneonta Museums and Other AtTractions anonymous arts museum 606 Charlotte Valley Rd., Charlotteville 607-397-8606 BREWERY OMMEGANG Milford 1-800-656-1212 COOPERSTOWN Art Assn. Gallery Cooperstown 607-547-9777 COOPERSTOWN & CHARLOTTE VALLEY RAILROAD Milford 607-432-2429 Cooperstown Brewing Co., River St., Milford. 607-286-9330 Fenimore Art Museum & Farmer’s Museum, Cooperstown, 607-547-1400, 607-547-1450 fly creek cider mill, Fly Creek 607-547-9692 Foothills Performing Arts Center, 24 Market St, Oneonta.607-431-2080 info@foothillspac.org foothillspac.org GILBERT LAKE STATE PARK Laurens 607-432-2114 GLIMMERGLASS STATE PARK Lake Otsego 607-547-8662 GREATER ONEONTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY 183 Main St., Oneonta 607-432-0960 www.OneontaHistory.org Greater Milford Historical Association Milford Hilton Bloom Art Gallery P.O.B. R, Gilbertsville 607-783-2779 hyde hall, Glimmerglass State Park. Closed Winter. 607-547-5098 www.hydehall.org major’s inn and gallery, Gilbertsville, NY. 607-783-2780 Murdock Fine Art Galleries, East Main St., Milford 607286-9941 NATIONAL BASEBALL HALL OF FAME Cooperstown, 607-547-7200 NATIONAL SOCCER HALL OF FAME Cooperstown, 607-432-3351 Oneonta Theatre 47 Chestnut St, Oneonta. www.oneontatheatre.com OTESAGA HOTEL & LEATHERSTOCKING GOLF COURSE Cooperstown, 607-547-9931 SAYER HOUSE Milford Historical Society, Milford SHARON SPRINGS HISTORIC DISTRICT. Rts.10 & 20 Smithy-Pioneer Gallery, 55 Pioneer St., Cooperstown 607547-8671. Studio 925, 925 South America Rd., Worcester 607-397-9207. SUNY-Oneonta Fine Arts Gallery, Fine Arts Building, SUNY-Oneonta, Oneonta 607-436-3717. www.oneonta.edu Schoharie Chamber of Commerce 143 Caverns Road HoweCave, NY 12902 518-296-8991 OCTOBER 1, 28, 29;8PM: PUBLIC STAR PARTY. Variety of telescopes will treat you to views of nebulae, star cluster, galaxies, planets and otehr celextial sights. Registration suggested because canceled if cloudy. George Landis Arboretum, 174 Lape Rd., Esperance. 875-6935 October 9, 16, 23, & 30: Storytelling Sundays in the Museum’s historic 1850s log cabin with Mohawk storyteller, Amanda Tarbell. Iroquois Museum, 324 Caverns Road, Howes Cave. info@iroquoismuseum.org (518) 296-8949 www.iroquoismuseum.org OCTOBER 8; FALL FESTIVAL AND PARADE. Arts and crafts vendors, activities and specials throughout the day. Parade 11:30 am on Main Street, Middleburgh. OCTOBER 8; 2-3:30pm: BIRD FEEDER WORKSHOP. Make a variety of bird feeders from natural or re-purposed materials nad learn the basics of feeding birds in your back yard. The Meeting House, George Landis Arboretum, 174 Lape Road, Esperance. 875-6935 OCTOBER 8; 10am: LONG PATH - Fall Foliage Hike. Mine Kill State Park Office, 161 Mine Kill State Park, North Blenheim. 827-6111 October 8-November 27: A Soldier’s Heart, A Sister’s Hands: Haudenosaunee Women Veterans. Honor hundreds of Haudenosaunee women who served in American military from WWII to present. Heart/Hands raise awareness of pride, bonds, and challenges of military service through art pieces created by women alone or in collaboration with their families and friends. October 22 from 2 to 4 Exhibition Opening. Iroquois Museum, 324 Caverns Road, Howes Cave. info@iroquoismuseum.org (518) 296-8949 www. iroquoismuseum.org OCTOBER 9; 2-3:30pm: FALL BACK ON NUTS Workshop. Look for acorns, shagbark, hickory nuts, pine cones and other edibles on this forest woalk. Instructor Anita Sanchez. Fee. The Meeting House, George Landis Arboretum, 174 Lape Road, Esperance. 875-6935 OCTOBER 12; 7pm: CHEESE MAKING IN NYS. Milt Sernett will talk about cheese making and how it has evolved from the efforts of early settlers in NY. Has written a boon on the topic “Farmstead” cheese makers are encouraged to bring samples. Carlisle Town Hall, 541 Crommie Rd, Carlisle. OCTOBER 14; PARANORMAL INVESTIGATION. Explore the Best Museum with a paranormal team and their equipment. 7;30 – 9pm or 9:30-11pm. Tickets call 518-827-4963 or eamil drbesthoue@yahoo.com. Dr. Best Museum, 1568 Clauverwie Rd, Middleburgh. OCTOBER 15; FALL HIKE. New York Power Authority Visitors Center, 1378 St. Rte. 30, North Blenheim. 800-724-0309. OCTOBER 15; 5pm: ZOMBIE RUN. Dr. Best Museum, 1568 Clauverwie, Middleburgh. OCTOBER 15; 7pm: NIGHTMARE ON CLAUVERWIE. Following Zombie run. Food, vendors, music and othe items available. Festive family fun, and Haunted Scarriage House. Dr. Best Museum, 1568 Clauverwie Rd, Middleburgh. October 15 & 16: A Legacy of Excellence: The Living Traditions of Iroquois Basketry, Beadwork, and Antler Carving. 10–5 Saturday & 1–5 Sunday. Demonstrations and works in progress with gifted antler and bone carvers Hayden Haynes (Seneca from Allegany) and Trevor Brant (Mohawk from Tyendinaga Territory). The Legacy Series is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Iroquois Museum, 324 Caverns Road, Howes Cave. info@iroquoismuseum.org (518) 296-8949 www. iroquoismuseum.org OCTOBER 8 - NOVEMBER 27; A SOLDIER’S HEART, A Sister’s hands: Haudenosaunee Women Veterans October 22, exhibition opening. Exhibit honors the hundreds of Haudenosaunee women who have served in the American military form WWII to present. heart/hands will raise awareness of the pride, bonods and challenges of military service through art pieces created by the women alone or in collaboration with their families and friends. Iroquoise Indain Museum, 324 Caverns Road, Howes Cave. 296-8949 OCTOBER 19; 7pm: MICHAEL FLESICHMAN PRESENTATION. Michael will share photography of local places photographed with a unique eye along with stories about getting the best shots. GilboaTown Hall, Rte. 990v, Gilboa. 607-588-6894 OCTOBER 22; 8pm: HALLOWEEN OWL PROWL. Full moon night searching for owls. Learn about common owls that live in the Arboretum woods and hen head into woods to see if we might hear and see owls. Landis Arboretum 174 Lape Rd, Esperance 518-875-6935 OCTOBER 23; HAUNTED HISTORY TOUR. New York Power Authority Visitors Center, 1378 St. Rte. 30, North Blenheim. 800-724-0309. OCTOBER 28, Nov. 25, 26; 8-9:30pm: PUBLIC STAR PARTY Join Albany Area Amateur Astronomers and use their telescopes to view nebulae, sar clusters, galaxies, double stars, planets and other celestial objects. Cancelled if skies are mosttly cloudy. Free. Landis Arboretum, 174 Lape Road, Esperance. 518-875-6935 OCTOBER 31; 4pm: TRICK OR TREAT on Main St. Cobleskill. Stop at businesses on Main St. for a special treat. NOVEMBER 5; 11am: INVASIVE SPECIES AWARENESS WORKSHOP. New York Power Authority Visitors Center, 1378 St. Rte. 30, North Blenheim. 800-724-0309. NOVEMBE R5; 10am: HISTORY OF THE RADEZ FAMILY. Sally Radez Obeldobel will share the story of the Radez family in Richmondville. Richmondville Municipal Building, 340 Main St., Richomondville. NOVEMBER 5; noon: MAKE DECORATIVE BAGS FROM PICTURE CALENDARS. Turn calendars in gift bas, envelopes, packaging for small
Stitch Witch  Embroidery - Printing - Transfers - Sublimation  1068 County Highway 2 DeLancey, NY 13752 607-746-7308 tion ...
gifts, or greeting cards. Bring calendar pictures and preferred type white glue or decorative scissors or paper punches. Landis Arboretum, 174 Lape Road, Esperance. 518-875-6935 NOVEMBER 6, 13, 20, 27; SUNDAY MOVIE New York Power Authority Visitors Center, 1378 St. Rte. 30, North Blenheim. 800-724-0309. November 6; 2PM: Talk by Albert Fulton - “Native American Land-Use and Environmental History in Iroquoia: New Insights from Historical, Archaeological, and Geological Evidence” Iroquois Museum, 324 Caverns Road, Howes Cave. info@iroquoismuseum.org (518) 296-8949 www.iroquoismuseum.org NOVEMBER 9; 7:30pm: IT’S A HARD LIFE. IT’S A GOOD LIFE. Meta Watts will discuss her book about farmin life in Schoharie – inteview with twelve farming families around Schoharie County that discuss hardships and joys of farming. Calisle Town Hall, 541 Crommie Rd, Carlisle. NOVEMBER 11; 5:30-7:30pm: LANDSI ARBORETUM WINE TASTING. New York’s finest wines and hors d’oeuvres. Learn the craft of wine making from vintners. Fee. Grapevine Farms, 2373 Rte. 7, Cobleskill. 875-6935 or email info@landisarboretum.org NOVEMBER 12, 13; 10am - 4pm: HOLDIDAY MARKET AND CRAFT SHOW. Sunnycrest Orchards, 7869 St. Rte. 10, Sharon Springs. NOVEMBER 18-20; 40TH ANNUAL HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW. Two floors of holiday decorated rooms and a Country Kitchen. Fri 10am - 7pm, Sat 9am7pm, Sun 9am-4pm. Free. Depot Lane Museum Complex, Schoharie. NOVEMBER 26; 9am - noon: DECORATING WITH NATIVE GREENERY. Learn the secrets of creating holiday decorations using native greenery. Fee includes greenery, ribbon and decorations; birng any additional decorative elements your would like. The Farm House, George Landis Arboretum, 174 Lape Road, Esperance. 875-6935 DECEMBER 1 - 21; FESTIVAL OF TREES. New York Power Authority Visitors Center, 1378 St. Rte. 30, North Blenheim. 800-724-0309. DECEMBER 2; 3pm: CHRISTMAS TIME IN SCHOHARIE. Craft show elementary school, shops along Main St open late, visit with Santa at Lasell Hall, enjoy music at the library and more. Village of Schoharie, various streets, Schoharie. DECEMBER 3; 5pm: CHRISTMAS PARADE AND TREE LIGHTING. Businesses, organizations, families and friends parade to Centre Park for tree lighting festivities. Santa leads up main street to firehouse for activities. Downtown Cobleskill - Centre Park. DECEMBER 3-4; 7pm: DEPOT LANE SINGERS HOLIDAY CONCERT. Schoharie Central School. DECEMBER 3; 10am: HISTORY OF THE FRASIE FAMILY. Dandy Lory and Lance Frasier will speak about Frasier Gore of land betwene four Patents in Richmondville and the Frasier family past and present. Richmondville Municipal Building, 340 Main St., Richmondville. DECEMBER 9; 5:30 - 8:30pm MIRACLE ON MAIN STREET. Stroll through Middleburgh and enjoy the celebration of holiday season in a small country town. Middleburgh. DECEMBER 9-11; VICTORIAN HOLIDAY. Activities include kissing beneath the mistletoe, Santa Claus or St. Nick, exchanging gifts, caroling, all traditions embraced by the Victorian Era. Fri 6pm, All day Sat and Sun. Sharon Springs Central School and Main St., Sharon Springs. DECEMBER 10; noon - 2pm: PHOTOS WITH SANTA New York Power Authority Visitors Center, 1378 St. Rte. 30, North Blenheim. 800-724-0309. DECEMBER 17; HOLIDAY MOVIE New York Power Authority Visitors Center, 1378 St. Rte. 30, North Blenheim. 800-724-0309. MUSEUMS AND OTHER ATTRACTIONS CAVE HOUSE MUSEUM 136 Blowing Rock Road, Howes Cave NY 12092 518-296-8800 THE GILBOA MUSEUM AND FOSSILS Stryker Road (Off Route 990V) kwyckoff@dmcom.net 607-588-9413 Howe Caverns 255 Discovery Drive, Howes Cave , NY 12092. 518-296-8900 OPEN ALL YEAR! (9am-6pm daily w/extended hours of 8am to 8pm July 1-Labor Day). Iroquois Indian Museum Large collection contemporary Iroquois art & craftwork. PO Box 7, 324 Caverns Road, Howes Cave, NY 12092. 518-296-8949. Landis Arboretum Educational, nonprofit public gardens teaching natural history, botany and horticulture. PO Box 186, 174 Lape Road, Esperance, NY 12066. 518-875-6935 Lansing Manor Museum Part of the Blenheim Patent. 1819 Fedreal style manor house. 1378 State Rte 30, North Blenheim , NY 12131. 518-827-6121 New York Power Authority Public utility; operates visitor center and Lansing Manor Museum. PO Box 898, 1378 State Route 30, North Blenheim , NY 12131. 518-827-6121 OLD STONE FORT MUSEUM 145 Fort Road, Schoharie NY 12157 518-295-7192. Schoharie Colonial Heritage Assoc. Operates Depot Lane Center, Schoharie Valley Railroad Museum, and Palatine House. PO Box 554, 143 Depot Lane, Schoharie , NY 12157. 518-295-7505. Schoharie Valley Railroad Museum Depot Lane, Schoharie, NY 12157. 518-295-7505 . Secret Caverns PO Box 88, 671 Caverns Road, Howes Cave, NY 518-296-8558 Sullivan County Visitors Association 100 Sullivan Avenue • PO Box 248 Ferndale, NY 12734 845-747-4449 www.scva.net THRU OCTOBER 29; KIT JONES PHOTOGRAPHY. Sponsored and presented by Delaware Valley Arts Alliance. Free. Tues – Sat 10am – 5pm. Alliance Gallery, Delaware Arts Center, 37 Mian St., Narrowsburg. 845-252-7576 OCTOBER 8: 1 - 5PM: CRAFT BEER FESTIVAL. In addition to the wide variety of the region’s best locally made beer and wine, specialty food and unique craft vendors, set against a backdrop of live music and the beauty of the Sullivan County Catskills ablaze in the height of fall color. More than twenty-five regional wineries from around the Hudson Valley and Finger Lakes regions. The day will also feature performances by Dan Brother Band and Jenna Esposito. General admission includes unlimited sampling and a complimentary wine tasting glass. Designated driver tickets available and include admission to the festival and to The Museum at Bethel Woods. Bethel Woods, 200 Hurd Road, Bethel. 866781-2922 info@bethelwoodscenter.org www.bethelwoodscenter.org OCTOBER 8 & 9; CALLICOON ARTWALK 2016, showcasing vibrant local artists in the picturesque hamlet of Callicoon on the Delaware, will present their work throughout the town. Along with video projections and outdoor art installations, Main Street merchants will also stay open into the evening, with maps available highlighting all exhibits and events featured in local shops, restaurants, and galleries. Saturday only- Art in the park highlights, Thrown pottery demonstration and participation, Custom canoe artisans showcasing their craft, Henna body painting, Face painting for children of all ages, Plein Air (outdoor landscape) painting, Interactive Callicoon community collage for children. “What makes a Village” interactive build a village project Saturday/Sunday Art around town, Video and Art Installations throughout town, Student art show at community center, Art blocks created by local artists exhibited throughout town for silent auction to fund future ARTWALK art supplies, Exhibiting art is for sale. Saturday – 12:00 to 8:00 Sunday – 12:00 to 5:00. For details and more information e-mail: alexis@ sirocdesign.com or call Alexis Siroc at (845) 887-5147. OCTOBER 14; 6pm: JEFF BANK 2017 CALENDAR RECEPTION. Jeff Bank and Catskill Ar Society (CAS) held eighth annual photo contest, Four Seasons of Nature & Landscapes in Sullivan County. Photographes will beon hand for our debut receiption. Refreshments. Catskill Arts Society, 48 Main St, Livingston Manor 845-436-4227 OCTOBER 14, 15, 22, 23, 28 & 29; “HAUNTED THEATRE TOURS” Last year’s “Haunted Theatre Tours” were such a hit with all who experienced the scary fun of exploring the dark corners of the Rivoli during the Halloween season that we’ve decided to do it again! If you missed it last year, don’t make the same mistake again this October. We’ll be pulling out all the stops to frighten and delight you! You’ve never seen the Rivoli like this! RIVOLI THEATRE, 5243 Main St., South Fallsburg. (845) 436-5336 www.scdw.net OCTOBER 15; 8pm: JARROD SPECTOR & KELLI BARRETT: “FUNNY HOW IT HAPPENS” Tony nominated Jarrod Spector and wife Kelli Barett celebrate the iconic Broadway shows they’ve starred in. Concert features pop favorites and iconic songs from Broadway musicals. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Rd, Bethel. 866-781-2922 OCTOBER 15; 7pm: MUSIC NIGHT AT THE PPC. Spirit Depot and Tony Penn. Phillipsport Community Center, 657 Red Hill Rd, Phillipsport. 845-210-4764. OCTOBER 15; 6pm: ROAST BEEF DINNER. Jeffersonvill Firehouse, 4903
gifts, or greeting cards. Bring calendar pictures and preferred type white glue or decorative scissors or paper punches. L...
St. Rte. 52 Jeffersonville. OCTOBER 15 - - Nov 20; TAL GLUCK, sculpture, MELINDA WALLACH, Walls of Vietnam. Oct. 15 Artist talk 3pm. Opening reception 4-6pm. Free. Thurs – Sat, Mon 11am – 6pm, Sun 11am – 3pm. CAS Arts Center, 48 Main St. Livingston Manor. 845-436-4227 OCTOBER 16; 1pm: SHARING MEMORIES OF THE DELAWARE WATER SYSTEM. Hear stories of the Delaware Water System’s reservoirs and tunnels from those who built them. Explore exhib, view never before displayed photos and documents and talk with tunnl and reservoir workers. Time and the Valleys Museum, 332 main St Grahamsville. 845-985-7700 OCTOBER 21, Nov 18, Dec 16, Jan 20, Feb 17, March 17, April 21, May 19; 6pm: INTERGENERAIONAL TEXTILE PROJECT PUBLIC GROUP. Free monthly opportunity to learn or work on knitting or crochet skills. Bev Hells, 4-H volunteer instructs. Make one item for community service and one for themselves. Cornell Cooperative Extension Sullivan County, 64 Ferndale-Loomis Rd. Liberty. 845-557-0694 OCTOBER 22; 6pm: SHAKESPEARE’S WILL. Lecture, supper, and show celebrating 400t anniversary of Shakespeare’s death,acted by Tannis Kowalchuk, playwright Vern Thiessen, director Mimi McGurl, NACL Theatre, 110Highland Lake Rd, Highland Lake. 845-557-0694 OCTOBER 27, Dec 22, Jan 26, Feb 23, mach 23, April 27, May 25; PAGES & PINTS: A BREWTASTIC BOOK GROUP. Book discussion. Must be 21 and up to attend. Visit the library for copy of bood. Registration required. Programs without 5 people preregistered may be cancelled. WSPLonline.org. email wsplprograms@rcls.org 845-887-4040. Callicoon Brewing Co., 16 Upper Main S, Callicoon. OCTOBER 28; 6pm: FALL PENNY SOCIAL. St. Aloysius, Church Hall, 25 Chruch St., Livingston Manor OCTOBER 28; 6pm: MOONLIT MOVIE. Bring blanket and snack, buy popcorn, and take a journey under the stars while watching The Silence of the Lambs. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Rd, Bethel 866-781-2922 OCTOBER 28; 7:30pm: STAR WATCH. Watch stars and planets, observe deep sky objects, and learn how to locate the constellations. Bring binoculars and/or your own telescope, and folding chairs if you have them. Free. Registration required. 570-226-3164, 845-583-1010. Delaware Highlnads Conservancy NY Office, 120 Segar & Rosenberg Road, Swan Lake. OCTOBER 28, Nov 25, Dec 23, jan 27, Feb 24, march 24, April 28, may 26; 6pm: ARTISTS ASSEMBLY. Opportunity to rendezvous with fellow artists, share creative process and get feed back from like minded people in creative social setting. Refreshments. Catskill Arts Society, 48 Main St, Livingston Manor, 845-436-4227. OCTOBER 29; 8-11PM: HALLOWEEN DANCE. Annual benefit dance. Live band, prizes for best costumes. Bring your own refreshments. Age: 21+ Delaware Youth Center, 8 Creamery Rd, Callicoon. (845) 887-5634. OCTOBER 29; 1PM: ANNUAL HALLOWEEN EXTRAVAGANZA. Children’s costume parade down Main Street. Games and treats. All are welcome to participate. (845) 887-5155 Delaware Youth Center, 8 Creamery Rd, Callicoon OCTOBER 30; 2pm: GONE MISSING IN NEW YORK. Marianna Boncek talks about her book which highlights individual stories of the missing and their families, including the tragic local story of Frederick Holmes, a 22 month old baby who went missing from Denman Mountain in 1955. Time and the Valleys Museum, 332 Main S, Grahamsville. 845-985-7700. www.TannersvilleAntiques&Artisans.com 6045 Main St. Tannersville NY ~ 518-589-5600 OCTOBER 30; 7pm: MOONLIT MOVIE. Bring blanket, snacks, buy popcorn watch The Witches. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Rd, Bethel. 866-781-2922 OCTOBER 30; 4pm: HALLOWEEN PARADE and Hoos Truck Co Ladies Auxiliary bake sale and raffle. Livingston Manor Firehouse, 52 Main S, Livingston Manor. NOVEMBER 2; 9am: 3 DAY INTRO TO ARTISAN CHEESEMAKING TRAINING. Learn all aspects of cheesemaking. Topics: Milk properties, hands on cheesemaking, use of starter and ripenng cultures, brining, aging the cheeses, equipment, facilites for small scale commercial cheesemaking and more. Partial scholarships avail. for farming families. Registration required. Cornell Cooperative Extension Sullivan County, 64 Ferndale-Loomis Rd, Liberty 845-292-6180. NOVEMBER 5; 2pm: THE CATSKILLS: IT’S HISTORY AND HOW IT CHANGED AMERICA. Talk by Stephen M. Silverman about his book on history of the Catskills. From Henry Hudson to Washington Irving, James Fenimore Cooper, Hudson River School painters, generations of Utopians at Woodstock to Jennie Grossinger – all here and written about with elegance, depth and respect. Time and the Valleys Museum, 332 Main S, Grahamsville. 845-985-7700. NOVEMBER 5; 7pm: THE DRIFTERS Celebration of 50 year catalogue and in support of their new album, “The Drifters Salute the Great American Songbook Live.” Bethel woods Center for the Arts, 200 Hurd Rd, Bethel. 866-781-2922 NOVEMBER 5,6; RICHARD III. Brad’s classic tale of despotic ambition for power, perfectly timed for his year’s historic election, performance reading conceived as radio play, letting the story fuel the listener’s imagination. Sat 7:30pm, sun 3pm. Laundry King, 65 Main St., Livingston Manor. NOVEMBER 6; noon: ANNUAL GALA AND LIVE AUCTION. Theme of annual fundraiser for Cornell Coop Ext Sullivan county is “Denima and Diamonds”: Enjoy locally sourced cuisine, live music and auction. Registration nad payment required in advance. Bernie’s Holiday Restaurant, 277 Rock Hill D., Rock Hill. 845-292-6180 NOVEMBER 11;7:30pm: FILM AND TALK: THE BURMESE HARP. Special screenign of the classic Kurosawa film The Burmese Harp (1956), featurnig a talk back with Michiko and Steve Levine. Laundry King, 65 Main St., Livingston Manor 845-436-4227 NOVEMBER 12 – DEC 23; VALLEY ARTISTS HOLIDAY SALE. Exhibit and sale. Tues – Sat 10am – 5pm. Alliance Gallery, Delaware Arts Center, 37 Main St, Narrowsburg. 845-252-7576 NOVEMBER 19; 8pm: BRADSTAN CABARET SERIES: LIZ CALLAWAY a Tony nominee and Emmy Award winning actress, singer and recording artist. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts. 200 Hurd Rd Bethel. 866-781-2922 NOVEMBER 19; 7pm: MUSIC NIGHT AT THE PPC. Moon Dog and (2) Kevin McDaniel with end of season jam. Phillipsport Community Center, 657 Red Hill Rd, Phillipsport. 845-210-4303. NOVEMBER 19 – Dec 23; ART IN SIXES. Exhibit of mixed media small works. Opening reception Sat. Nov. 19 7pm. Open 10am – 5pm. Allinace Gallery, Delaware Arts Center, 37 Main St, Narrowsburg 845-252-7576 NOVEMBER 20; 2pm: D&H CANAL & SULLIVAN COU NTY. Bill Merchant will talk about the impact of the D&H Canal on Sullivan County. Time and the Valleys Museum, 332 Main St, Grahamsville 845-985-7700 NOVEMBER 25 7pm: JAMES DWORESTKY MEMORIAL HOLIDAY PARADE. Downtown, Main St., Jeffersonville. NOVEMBER 25, 26; 9AM-4PM: HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR. Unique assortment of merchandise for holiday shopping. (845) 887-5634. Delaware Community Center, 8 Creamery Rd, Callicoon NOVEMBER 26;12:30pm: SANTA & HIS ELVES visit Jeffersonville lobby of Jeff Bank. Visit and have photo taken with Santa. Cookies, hot chocolate and Christmas crafts to take home or give to Santa. Proceeds donated to local food bank. 845-482-5688. Horse & carriage rides weather permitting on corner of Maple Ave and St. Rte. 52. Various locations, Jeffersonville. NOVEMBER 26, 27; 11am: HANDMADE FOR THE HOLIDAYS. Artwork of more than 30 artists, crafters and local producers. Duke Pottery, 855 County Rd, 93, Roscoe. DECEMBER 3; CHILDRENS CHRISTMAS. Children’s party feauring arts and crafts projects, cupcake decorating and photos with Santa 1-3pm. Delaware Youth Center, 8 Creamery Rd, Callicoon 845-887-5155. DECEMBER3; 9am: EAGLE WATCH VOLUNTEER TRAINING. Delaware Highlands Conservancy for an overview of the voluntee program followed by visits to actual monitoring sites. Volunteers meet at visitor center 9am. Register email info@delawarehighlands.org 570-226-3164. Upper Delaware Visitor Center, 176 Scenic Drive, Lackawaxen Pa. DECEMBER 3; 10am: HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE. Catksill Fly Fishing Center & Museum, 1031 Old Rte. 17, Livingston Manor. 845-439-4810 DECEMBER 3; 1-3PM: CHRISTMAS IN CALLICOON. Children’s Christmas Party. Arts and crafts projects for holiday giving, cupcake decorating, photos with Santa for a nominal fee. (845) 887-5155. Delaware Community Center, 8 Creamery Rd, Callicoon DECEMBER 3; 5:45pm: TREE LIGHTING. Hot chocolate, cookies, caroling. River Road Cul-De-Sac, Barryville. DECEMBER 4; 3pm: LYRIC QUARTET. Grand Holiday Musical Feast with special guest artists, door prizes and bell ringing. Ticket price includes dinne. Dead End Café, 6 Main St., Parksville. 845-292-0400 DECEMBER 10; 12-7PM: DICKENS ON THE DELAWARE. Retailers, galleries and restaurants highlight their Holiday goods and dazzle town visitors with Holiday Spirit. Shopkeepers dressed in Victorian garb, with stores, restaurants and the surrounding environs decorated to create the days of yore. Callicoon, NY. museums and other attractions Amapro Family Fun Center Liberty 845-292-9022 Apple Pond Farming Center 845-482-4764. Audubon Society of NYS Delaware Valley Region, Eldred 845557-8025. BETHEL WOODS ARTS CENTER Bethel Woods, NY 845-454-3388 Bloomingburg Dutch Reformed Church Bloomingburg 845-733-4809. Callicoon Center 845-482-4764 CAS Arts Center, 48 Main St., Livingston Manor, NY 845-436-4227
St. Rte. 52 Jeffersonville. OCTOBER 15 - - Nov 20  TAL GLUCK, sculpture, MELINDA WALLACH, Walls of Vietnam. Oct. 15 Artist...
Catskill Fly Fishing Museum Livingston Manor 845-439-4810. Catskill Fun Land Fallsburg 845-436-5000. Catskill Morning Farm Livingston Manor 845-482-3984 Catskill Pheasantry and Sporting Clays Long Eddy 845-887-4487. Choo Choo Charlie’s Large Scale Trains Liberty 845-292-4826. Delaware Valley Arts Alliance and Gallery Narrowsburg 845-252-7576. DELAWARE VALLEY RAPTOR CENTER 416 Cummins Hill Rd., Milford, PA 570-296-6025 www.dvrconline.org Forestburgh Playhouse Forestburgh 845-794-1194 Fort delaware 6615 Route 97, Narrowsburg 845-794-3007 Frost Valley YMCA 845-985-2254 www.frostvalley.org. Liberty Paint Ball Games Ltd. Ferndale 845-292-7500. Nutshell Art Center Rt. 52 Lake Huntington 845-932-8708 or 718-740-5490 Neversink Valley Area Museum 26 Hoag Rd., Cuddebackville 845-754-8870 NeversinkValley Historical society Port Jervis 845856-2375 www.minisink.org Petting Zoo at Hadley Stables Monticello 845-434-9254. Roscoe Ontario & Western Railway Caboose Roscoe 845-439-4859. Sullivan County Museum and Historical Society Hurleyville 845-438-8044. Ten Mile River Scout Museum 1481County Road #26,Narrowsburg 845- 252-3911 Tomsco Falls Park Mountaindale 845-434-6065 Upper Delaware scenic parks and recreation National Park Service, 274 River Rd., Beach Lake, PA 570-729-7134 ULSTER COUNTY TOURISM 20 BROADWAY, KINGSTON, NY 12401 For more information on Ulster County events contact: www.UlsterCountyAlive.com 1-800-342-5826 OCTOBER 15,22,29, Nov 5,12, 19, 16; 9am: KINGSON FARMERS MARKET. Local produce, meats, dairy, wellness items, treats, baked goods, alcohol and more. Old Dutch Church, 272 Wall St. Kingston OCTOBER 15,22,29; 10am: SAUGERITES FARMERS MARKET. Local produce, meas and more. Children’s art corner, live music. Special events throughout season. Downtown 115 Main St., Saugerties. OCTOBER 9, 16, 23, 30; 10am: ELLENVILLE FARMERS MARKET. Locally grown fruits, vegetables, crafts, family entertainment and events. Downtown, market Street, Ellenville OCTOBER 9, 16, 23, 30, Nov 6, 13, 20; 10am: NEW PALTZ FARMERS MARKET. Town Court Parking Lot, 25 Plattekill Ave., New Paltz OCTOBER 7 – 23; THE NIGHT ALIVE Tommy’s down and out. Then one day, he comes to the rescue of Aimee, who’s just getting by herself. Together this unusual pairing will try to get beyond their pass and make something of their lives. Thurs – Sat 8pm, Sun 2pm. Shadowland Theatre, 157 Canal St., Ellenville. 845-647-5511 OCTOBER 8, 9; 10am to 5pm; ANNUAL FALL FESTIVAL. Fun-filled activities for the entire family, yummy food, live music, fall foliage sky rides, pumpkin decorating, craft, antique, yad sale vendors and more! It will be a great weekend and we hope to see you for a little pre-winter get together. Belleayre Ski Center, 181 Galli Curci Rd, Highmount, NY 12441 OCTOBER 9; 7PM: CATSKILL INTERPRETIVE CENTER FALL GALA. Catskill Interpretive Center, 5096 RTE 28 MT TREMPER, NY, 12457  845.688.3369 . www.catskillinterpretivecenter.org OCTOBER 10; 11am: ADAMS ANNUAL HARVEST FEST. Free fun for kids – pony rides, petting zoo, face painting and more. Adams Fairacre Farm, 1560 Ulster Ave., Lake Katrine. 845-336-6300 OCTOBER 12, 19; 3:30pm: WOODSTOCK FARM FESTIVAL. Celebrate our farmers and community with fresh local produce, outdoor dining, kids activities, special events and peace, love and music. Downtown, 6 Maple Lane, Woodstock OCTOBER 13 – 16; WOODSTOCK FILM FESTIVAL. Roster of over 150 films, concerts, panels and the Maverick Awards Ceremony. Various locations in Woodstock, Rosendale, Kingston and Saugerties. 845-6794265 OCTOBER 14, 15; 8pm: BELFAST BLUES. Geraldine Hughes performs her one woman play, about Huges’ perspective as a little girl coming of age in the war-torn Belfast of 1980’s. McKenna Theatre, SUNY New Paltz, 1 Hawk Dr., New Paltz. 845-257-3880. OCTOBER 14, Nov. 11, Dec. 9, Jan 13, Feb 10, march 10, April 14, May 12; 6pm: CATKSILL MOUNTAIN ACCOUSTIC SLOW JAM. All accoustic musicians welcome, advanced beginners to professional. Local musicians meet to play Bluegrass, Irish, Old Time, Western Swing in low-key, relaxed atmosphere. Free. Pine Hill Community Center, 287 Main St., Pine Hill. 845-254-5469 OCTOBER 15; 10am: ENDURANCE RUN CAR SHOW. Celebrating the 1903 run of the automobile to see how much they could endure with a station stop in Pine Hill. First 50 cars receive dash plaque. 1929 and older free entry, 1930 to present entry. DJ, 50/50, food, pumpkins, fresh veggies. Trophies to top 20 and special trophies. Wear period clothing and win a prize. OCTOBER 15; HALLOWEEN CARNIVAL & HAUNTED TRAILS. Fall activities 9am – 4:45pm. Haunted Trails & Carnival games 7-10pm. Costume parades, pumpkin painting, mask making, and apple cidering. Win prizes in Halloween games. Please register in advance. Frost Valley YMCA, 2000 Frost Valley Rd, Claryville. 845-985-2291. OCTOBER 15; 2pm: PRESENTATION: MARISA SCHEINFELD. Photographer presents slide talk detailing a brief history of the rise and fall of Borscht Belt, and her photographs of old hotels. Book launch event. Student Union Building, SUNY New Paltz, 1 Hawk Dr., New Paltz. OCTOBER 15; 6pm: WALKWAY MEMBER MOONWALK. Walkway over the Hudson State Historic park, 87 Haviland Rd., Highland. OCTOBER 16, Nov. 20, Dec. 18; 5pm: SLOW JAM. People who are new playing an accoustic instrument practice with friendly, local musicians at slower pace. Gardiner Library, 133 Farmer’s Turnpike, Gardiner. 845-255-1255 OCTOBER 18; INNISFREE – BEETHOVEN TO BARBER. Innisfree, violinist Carole Cowan, cellist Susan Seligman, and pianist Sylvia Buccelli perform trios and sonatas by Ludwig van Beethoven and Samuel Barber. Studley Theatre, SUNY New Paltz, 1 Hawk Dr., New Paltz. 845257-2700 October 18; 10:30am: BROWN BEAR, BROWN BEAR AND OTHER TREASURED STORIES. UPAC, 601 Broadway, Kingston, 845.331.1613 www.upac.org OCTOBER 19; 7:30pm: SHOWCASE CONCERT. Performing ensembles of SUNY Ulster – Wind Ensemble, Community Band, Jazz Ensemble, String Ensemble and Choral Ensembles. Quimby Theater, SUNY Ulster 491 Cottekill Rd., Stone Ridge, 845-687-5000 OCTOBER 20; 4pm: HUDSON VALLEY FOOD TRUCK FESTIVAL. Delicious food, live music, playground for the kids. Rain or shine. Cantine Field, Kiwanis Ice Arena, Saugerties. OCTOBER 21, Nov 18, Dec 16, Jan 20, Feb 17, March 17, April 21, May 19; 8pm: ASK FOR MUSIC. Third Fridays feature three lineups of some of the Hudson Valley’s acoustic performers. Arts Society of Kingson (ASK) 79 Broadway, Kingston. 845-338-0331 OCTOBER 21; 6PM: WALKTOBERFEST on the Walkway Over The Hudson. During select weekends in October, Walkway State Historic Park (which normally closes at 6:00 pm during October) will stay open past sunset for visitors to enjoy. The park will close at 7:30 pm. Walkway Over The Hudson 87 Haviland Road, Highland OCTOBER 22; 2pm: GALLERY TALK AND TOUR of SUNY New Paltz metal program led by Myra Mimlitsch-Gray and Akiko Busch. In conjunction with In/Animate: Recent work by Myra Mimlitsch-Gray. Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, SUNY New Paltz, 1 Hawk Dr., New Paltz. 845-257-3844. OCTOBER 23; 11am: GUIDED WALKING TOUR OF MAIN STREET. Starts at Hurley Heritage Museum. Rain or shine. Colonel Jonathan Elmendorf House, 52 Main St., Hurley. 845-331-8852 OCTOBER 23; 11am: FALL FAMILY FUN FESTIVAL. Apple cidering, nature hikes, hay rides, face painting, pumpking painting, blacksmithing, broom making, music, food and crafts, and more. Music by Jay & Molly and Annie and the Hedonists. Ashokan Center, 477 Beaverkill Rd., Olivebridge. 845-657-8333 OCTOBER 23; 3pm: SPEAKERS SERIES, A.J. SCHENKMAN author will discuss the book “Wicked Ulster” tales of gangs, desperados ad more. Free. Saugerties Historical Society, 119 Main St., Saugerties.
Catskill Fly Fishing Museum Livingston Manor 845-439-4810. Catskill Fun Land Fallsburg 845-436-5000. Catskill Morning Farm...
845-246-9529 OCTOBER 25; 8pm: GYPSY SONGS: THE ROMANI DIASPORA. Assistant Professor of Music Alex Peh, piano joined by Samantha Malk, mezzo soprano, performance around theme of Gypsy songs. The Romani Diaspora. Studley Theatre, SUNY New Paltz, 1 Hawk Dr., New Paltz 845-257-2700 OCTOBER 27; 6PM: Talk with Author Stephen Long, “Thirty-Eight”. Catskill Interpretive Center, 5096 Rte 28 MT TREMPER, NY, 12457 845.688.3369. www.catskillinterpretivecenter.org OCTOBER 28; 6:30pm: GHOST WALK OF MAIN ST. HURLEY AND CEMETERY. Reservations recommended. 845-228-7686. Colonel Jonathan Elmendorf House, 52 Main St., Hurley. OCTOBER 28; 7pm: LOST RONDOUT STORY OF URBAN REMOVAL. Lynn Woods/Stephen Blauweiss (Film, Q&A). History of Rondout. The D&H Canal Historical Society and Museum, 23 Mohonk Rd, High Falls. 845-687-2000 OCTOBER 29; 10AM: MAKE A DIFFERENCE DAY at The Walkway Over The Hudson. Millions of volunteers unite with a common mission – to improve the lives of others. In its 24th year, Make A Difference Day is a USA TODAY initiative, backed by the Gannett Company and TEGNA Inc. In collaboration with Points of Light it is the largest national day of community service. http://makeadifferenceday.com/ Walkway Over The Hudson 87 Haviland Road, Highland https://walkway.org/-/make-a-difference-d-2 OCTOBER 29; 10AM: 7TH ANNUAL ULSTERCORPS ZOMBIE ESCAPE (raindate October 30th, 2016) Register at http://www.active. com/kingston-ny/running/distance-running-races/7th-annual-ulstercorpszombie-escape-2016 Enjoy fall foliage and trails, while dodging zombies and other spooky surprises hiding in the woods, tunnels and caves – a perfect family friendly way to start your Halloween. Options for all levels competitors: Free 1K Fun Run for kids, 5K timed race and Zombie Escape, 1K walk/hike. Top finishers will receive awards in gender and age group categories. Runners can opt to avoid being attacked by zombies and compete in the timed race without wearing flags. Bonfire, refreshments, hot chocolate and s’mores. Williams Lake 434 Williams Lake Rd, off Binnewater Road, Rosendale OCTOBER 29; 6-11PM: VAMPIRE BALL HALLOWEEN PARTY. The HealthAlliance Foundation & Tonner Doll Co. present the 4th Vampire Ball Halloween Party.  A frightfully good time awaits at Diamond Mills in Saugerties. Dinner, dancing, and silent auction.  Tables feature limited edition designer dolls, for sale at night’s end.  And costume contest!  While costumes are not required, strongly encouraged  Awards given for Scariest, Funniest, Best Group, Most original, Most glamorous, and other surprise categories. All proceeds benefit HealthAlliance. For info and registration, call HealthAlliance Foundation office 845-334-2760 or visit our website. Diamond Mills 25 S. Partition St., Saugerties www.diamondmillshotel. com/ OCTOBER 29; 3pm: SCHUBERT MASS IN G: CAPPELLA FESTIVA AND THE MOUNT BRUDEHOF CHOIR join together to sing Franz Schubert’s mass in G (D 167) in soaring chapel at the Mount. Seating is limited and reservations essential. Mount Community Chapel, 1001 Braodway Esposus. 845-384-8090. OCTOBER 29; 6pm: VAMPIRE BALL HALLOWEEN PARTY presented by Health Alliance Foundation & Tonner Doll Co. Dinner, dancing and silent auction. Diamond Mills, 25 South Partition St., Saugerties. Bavarian Manor PurlinG/Cairo, NY 518-622-3261 www.BavarianManor.com OCTOBER 30; 10-4PM: KINGSTON MODEL TRAIN AND RAILROAD HOBBY SHOW. 11,000 square feet of operating layouts, dealer and vendor tables, large-scale garden railroad train display, model train exhibits, modular layouts, toy train raffles, LEGO trains and tasty food and refreshments. Admission: Adults $6, Children (under 12) $1. For additional information, including becoming a vendor, contact 845-616-0931. This event occurs annually in March and October. Murphy Midtown Center 467 Broadway, Kingston www.kingstontrainshow.com OCTOBER 31; 4pm: TRICK OR TREAT ON HUGUENOT STREET. Historic Huguenot Street, 81 Huguenot St., New Paltz. NOVEMBER 1; 8pm: VOCAL CHAMBER JAZZ, SINGER and CONCERT CHOIR. Small jazz and classical vocal ensembles. Studley Theatre, SUNY New Paltz, 1 Hawk Dr., New Paltz. 845-257-2700 NOVEMBER 4, Dec 2, Jan 6, Feb 3, March 3, April 7, May 5; 6pm: FIRST FRIDAYS IN SAUGERTIES. Village businesses stay open lae and offer special activities and discouns. Facebook.com/SaugertiesFirstFriday Various locations,partition, Market and Main St, Saugerties. 845-387-3112 NOVEMBER 4, Dec 2, Jan 6, Feb 3, March 3, April 7, May 5; 7pm: STAR NATION SACRED CIRCLE. Positive not for skeptics, discussion group for experiencers of the paranoral. Open to all dreames, contactees, abductees, ET Ambassadors & those interested in acknowledgin extraterrestrial presence on earth. Bring drink, snack to share, chair. Center for Symoblic Studies, 475 River Rd, Ext., Tillson. NOVEMBER 4; 6pm: TRIVIA NIGHT WITH CLIFF ROCKMULLER. Not only for historians, questions cove music, pop culture, history, language, geography, almost anything. Light dinner served. Bevier House Museum, 2682 Rte. 209, Marbletown. 845-338-5614 NOVEMBER 5; 2pm: ART WORKSHOP. Repurposing objects into art with Hudson Valley Artist: Meg Lipke. Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, SUNY New Paltz, 1 Hawk Dr., New Paltz. 845-257-3844 NOVEMBER 5; 1-5PM: BAD SEED CIDER FALL BACK FESTIVAL. Unique small batch Craft hard ciders made using apples grown in the Hudson River valley exclusively for this event to Sample along with great local beers totaling 15 taps of options all included in your Ticket. Hudson valley Sausage company great barbecue items for purchase, and classic fall foods, apple cider doughnuts, homemade pies by slice. Great ciders, food and live music. Tickets can be purchased in advance on website. Bad Seed Cider Co. 43 Baileys Gap Rd, Highland (845) 236-0956 www. badseedhardcider.com/ NOVEMBER 5; 1-4pm: JOB FAIR. Belleayre Mountain is accepting applications for full time and part time winter positions in several departments. Some positions require full time employment, minimum of 18 years of age, shift work available, able to work outdoors and able to perform the physical functions of the job. Applicants must be dependable, hard- working, customer service friendly and willing to work weekends and holidays, some positions require prior experiences or certifications. Belleayre Mountain is an EOE. For info or have packet mailed contact Human Resource Department at 845-254-5600. Belleayre Ski Center, 181 Galli Curci Rd, Highmount, NY 12441 NOVEMBER 5, Dec 3, Jan 7, Feb 4, March 4, April 1, May 6; 5pm: FIRST SATURDAY CELEBRATIONS. Live music, open studio tours, theatrical performances, historical re-enactments, arts and culural activities and more. Askforart.org 845-338-0331 NOVEMBER 5, 6, 12, 13, 19, 20, 26, 27, Dec 3, 4; noon: KINGSTON MODEL RAILROAD CLUB ANNUAL OPEN HOUSE. O scale 2 rail model railroad layout. See everything from turn of he century steam power, to most moden freight train, huge circus train, Thomas the Tank Engine model and Santa Claus own train. Kingston Model Railroad Club, Susan St., Kingston. NOVEMBER 5, Dec 3, Jan 7, Feb 4, March 4, April 1, May 6; 10:30am: UKULELE AT LIBRARY. Monthly lesson and jam sessions. Ukuleles available for check out with library card. Phoenicia Library, 9 Ava Maria, Phoenicia. NOVEMBER 6, Dec 4, Feb 5, March 5, April 2, May 7; 2pm: FIRST SUNDAY FREE GALLERY TOUR with guest educator Kevin Cook. Dorsky Museum, SUNY New Paltz, 1 Hawk Dr., New Paltz. NOVEMBER 8; 8pm: EIGHT HANDS PLAYING SYMPHONIES. Paino students join SUNY New Paltz Music faculty for performances. Nadia & Max Shepard recial Hall, SUNY New Paltz, 1 Hawk Dr., New Paltz. NOVEMBER 10 – 20; OKLAHOMA. Rodgers and Hammersteins musical. Thurs – Sat. 8pm, Sun 2pm. McKenna Theatre, SUNY New Paltz, 1 Hawk Dr., New Paltz. NOVEMBER 12; 10am: LIPPMAN PARK CYCLOCROSS. Course features open park and small portion of mountain bike trails. Expect a Leman’s start, run ups, barriers an more. Contact Bill 845-300-8361. Lippman Park ,Rte. 209 Wawarsing. NOVEMBER 12; 6pm: WALKWAY MEMBER MOONWALK. Enjoy walking under the full moon. Walkway Ove the Hudson State Historic Park, 87 Haviland Rd., Highland NOVEMBER 13; 8:30am: THIRD ANNUAL DAY OF JEWISH LEARNING AT SUNY ULSTER. Stimulating lecurres, discussion, participatory activities, kosher food and book exchange. SUNY Ulster, Vanderlyn Hall, 491 Cottekill Rd., Stone Ridge, 845-338-8131 NOVEMBER 15; 8pm: SYMPHONIC BAND. Evening of new and classic works for wind band with student preformers. Studley Theatre, SUNY New Paltz, 1 Hawk Dr., New Paltz. NOVEMBER 17; 7;30PM: EMERGING ARTIST CLASSICAL MUSIC SERIES: William Beecher showcases his talent on the bassoon - a large, double reed instrument that is often not given the opportunity to
845-246-9529 OCTOBER 25  8pm  GYPSY SONGS  THE ROMANI DIASPORA. Assistant Professor of Music Alex Peh, piano joined by Sam...
shine as a solo instrument. Come hear some wonderful music and have a drink. ARTBAR Gallery 674 Broadway Kingston 845-338-2789 artbargallery.com NOVEMBER 19; noon: SAUGERTIES FARMERS HOLIDAY MARKET. Food and handmade gifts. Sr. Citizen’s Multipurpose Bldg., 207 Market St., Saugerties. 845-750-0626 NOVEMBER 20; 10AM: ROSENDALE INTERNATIONAL PICKLE FESTIVAL Cultures of many countries are represented with food and music. Vendors offer a variety of wares. Contests, prizes and plenty of pickles, Accessible. ATM available. Always Sunday before Thanksgiving. Trailways bus stops directly across the street from the festival.  Rosendale Recreation Center 1055 Route 32 Rosendale 845-204-8827 http://rosendalechamber.org/pickle-festival NOVEMBER 24; 9AM: FAMILY OF NEW PALTZ ANNUAL TURKEY TROT Details can be found on website. Online registration to participate in the 5K walk/run or free kids 1/2 mile fun run: http://newpaltzturkeytrot.itsyourrace.com/event.aspx?id=5941 Water Street Market Water Street New Paltz www.newpaltzturkeytrot.com NOVEMBER 25; 1-3PM: SANTA ON THE WALKWAY. Santa will make a surprise visit on the Walkway’s West (Highland) approach. Walkway Over The Hudson 87 Haviland Road, Highland NOVEMBER 26; 8AM:SIXTH ANNUAL PHOENICIA TURKEY TROT. 2.4-mile fun run, ramble, trot, walk or wobble to benefit the Morton Memorial Library in Pine Hill. Open to all. Tot Trot (under age 5) 9:30 a.m. See website for pre-registration fees and info. Registration day-of 8 a.m.-9:45 a.m. Parish Hall. Main race 10 a.m., rain or shine. No dogs. For info, Heather Roberts 845-688-7064 / hrobertspt@gmail.com or Patti Rudge 845-254-4126 / rudgepatricia@gmail.com Parish Hall 109 Main St. Phoenicia 845-688-7064 or 845-254-4126 http://www.phoeniciaturkeytrot. com/index.html NOVEMBER 29; 7:30pm: COLLEGE WIND AND PERCUSSION ENSEMBLES. Quimby Theatre, SUNY Ulster, 491 Cottekill Rd., Stone Ridge. 845-687-5000 DECEMBER 2; 7pm: COMMUNITY TREE LIGHTING. Historic Huguenot St., Deyo House, 81 Huguenot St., New Paltz. 845-255-1660 DECEMBER 2; 3pm. HONORS RECITAL. Quimby Theatre, SUNY Ulster, 491 Cottekill Rd., Stone Ridge. 845-687-5000 DECEMBER 2-18. EVERY CHRISTMAS STORY EVER TOLD. Three actors perform every Christmas story ever told- plus holiday traditions from around the world. Thurs – Sat 8pm, Sun 2pm. Shadowland Theatre, 157 Canal St., Ellenville. 845-647-5511. DECEMER 3; 9am: FESTIVAL OF HOLIDAYS COMMUNITY DAY. Around the fireplace for hot cocoa and holiday centered games and crafts, or camp favorites archery, hikes, climbing and more. Free. Frost Valley YMCA, 2000 Frost Valley Rd., Claryville 845-985-2291. DECEMBER 3; 11am: ST. NICK CELEBRATION. Colonel Jonathan Elmendorf House, 52 Main St., Hurley. DECEMBER 3; HOLIDAY IN VILLAGE SAUGERTIES. Events throughout village, toy raffle, horse and wagon rides, Holiday Market, Santa and petting zoo at Kiersted House. Various locations. Saugerties. DECEMBER 3; 5PM: 35TH ANNUAL WOODSTOCK HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE Christmas tree lighting, live music, pictures with Santa, face painting with Mrs. Claus, the Grinch, Victorian Carolers, Ice Sculpting, the Kingston Catholic School Chorus and more. Refreshments in participating stores and businesses in and around the hamlet of Woodstock. 5 p.m.–9 p.m. Free. Tinker Street Woodstock 845-679-6234 http://woodstockchamber.com/ DECEMBER 9-11; HISTORIC ULSTER COUNTY IN GINGERBREAD EXHIBITION. Ginger bread houses and structures built to represent many of our treasured historical sites in Ulster County. Dec. 9 6pm, Dec 10 dn 11 noon. Bevier House Museum, 2682 Rte. 209, Marbletown. 845-338-5614 DECEMBER 15; 7:30PM: ELYSIA ROMAN DELIVERS AN HOMAGE to one of the most prolific composers for harp, Carlos Salzedo. Román’s recital will feature several of Salzedo’s original compositions, as well as arrangements written by the likes of Debussy, Handel, and Haydn. ARTBAR Gallery 674 Broadway Kingston 845-338-2789 http:// artbargallery.com/ DECEMBER 17; 3pm: TUBA CHRISTMAS. Tuba and euphonium platers of all ages perform traditional Christmas music from around the world. Clinton Hall, Ulster Savings Bank Community Conference Center, SUNY Ulster. 491 Cottekill Rd., Stone Ridge. 845-687-5000 DECEMBER 17; 2PM: HUDSON VALLEY PHILHARMONIC: Handel’s Messiah. UPAC, 601 Broadway, Kingston, 845.331.1613 www. upac.org JANUARY 27 – 30; 19th ANNUAL CATSKILL ICE FESTIVAL. Multiple clinics on all skills & techniques for ice climbing, baskic skills, slide shows, demo gear and more. Slide show free. Reservations required. Schedule and register alpineendeavors.com/reference/catskill-ice-festival2017 877-486-5769 FEBRUARY 3-5 WINTER HOOT. Benefit for Ashokan Center. Local food, beer, wine, music, dancing, film, art, nature activities for all ages. Ashokan Center, 477 Beaverkill Rd., Olivebridge. 845-657-8333 museums and other attractions Bearsville Theater Rte. 212, Bearsville, 845-679-4406. Belleayre, Highmount 1-800-942-6904, www.belleayre.com BRADFORD GRAVES SCULPTURE PARK, Kerhonkson. 845 626 4038 www.bradfordgravessculpturepark.com Bruderhof Museum Rifton, NY. 845-658-7754. bruderhofmuseum.com Canal Forge working Blacksmith Shop, Rte. 6 and Towpath Rd., High Falls, 845-687-7130. Catskill Mountain Railroad Phoenicia, 845-688-7400. catskillmtrailroad.com Center for Photography 59A Tinker Street, Woodstock, 845-679-9957 D & H Canal Museum Mohonk Road, High Falls, 845-687-9311. Ellenville Public Library Museum 40 Center Street, Ellenville, 845-647-5530. Empire State Railway Museum Station Rd., Phoenicia, 845688-7501. Forsyth Nature Center Kingston, 845-331-1682, forsythnaturecenter.org Greenfield Park Museum. Off Rte. 52 West, Greenfield Park, 845-647-6570. HITS 319 Main St, Saugerties, 845-246-8833 www.hitshows.com Hudson River Cruises Rondout Landing, Kingston, 800-8437472 Hudson River Maritime Museum 50 Rondout Landing, Kingston, 845-338-0071. www.hrmm.org historic Huguenot Street New Paltz, 845-255-1660. www.huguenotstreet.org Hudson Valley Philharmonic 601 Broadway, Kingston, 845454-1222. Hudson Valley LGBTQ Community Center, 300 Wall Street, Kingston. 845.331.5300 www.lgbtqcenter.org Hurley Heritage Society 52 Main Street, Hurley, 845-338 1661. www.hurleyheritagesociety.org. Kleinert/James Art Center Woodstock, 845-679-2079 Kingston Heritage Area Visitors Center, Rondout Visitor Center 20 Broadway, Kingston, N.Y. 800-331-1518 www.kingston-ny.gov Klyne-Esopus Historical Society Museum Rte, 9W, Ulster Park, 845-338-8109. Kripplebush Museum Stone Ridge, 845-687-0510/9229. Mohonk Preserve New Paltz, 845-255-0919 www.mohonkpreserve.org New York Conservatory for the Arts 120 Schildknecht Rd., Kingston, 845-339-4340. www.nyca.org OLIVE FREE LIBRARY, 4033 Rt. 28A, West Shokan, 845-657-2482 www.olivefreelibrary.org Opus 40 & Quarryman’s Museum 50 Fite Road, Saugerties, 845-246-3400. Rondout II Lighthouse Rondout Creek, Kingston, 845-3380071. Saugerties Lighthouse Conservancy Saugerties, 845246-4380. Senate House Museum 312 Fair Street, Kingston, 845-3382786. Shadowland Theater 157 Canal Street, Ellenville, 845-6475511. Samuel dorsky museum of art New Paltz, 845-257-3844. www.newpaltz.edu/museum Town of Shandaken Historical Museum Academy Street, Pine Hill, 845-254-4460. Trolley Museum 89 East Strand, Kingston, 845-331-3399. www. tmny.org
shine as a solo instrument. Come hear some wonderful music and have a drink. ARTBAR Gallery 674 Broadway Kingston 845-338-...
Ulster County Historical Society Museum Rte. 209, Marbletown, 845-338-5614. Ulster Performing Arts Center, The Broadway theatre at UPAC 601 Broadway, Kingston, 845-331-1613. Unison Arts and Learning Center 68 Mountain Rest Road, New Paltz, 845-255-1559. Volunteer Firemen’s Hall and Museum 265 Fair Street, Kingston, 845-331-0866. Women’s Studio Workshop 722 Binnewater Rd. Rosendale, 845-658-9133. Woodstock Artists Assn. 28 Tinker Street, Woodstock, 845-679-2940. www.woodstockart.org LRHS 2016 Train Schedule Regular Fares Adults: $16, Seniors (62up): $15, Children (3-12): $13, Under 3 FREE. Schedules subject to change. Regular Trains Thursdays, June 9-September 1, 10AM Special Trains Sept 24 – Oct 9, and Columbus Day Oct 10: Fall Foliage Trains Saturdays and Sundays. 1PM Reservations Not Required. Oct15: Pumpkin Patch Train 1PM Nov 25, 26, Dec 3, 4, 10, 11 & 17: Santa Expresses 2PM December 3 & 10: Christmas Lights Trains 6:30PM Special Trains Fare: Adults $20, Seniors $19, Children (3-12) $17, Under 3 FREE Reservations and Prepayment Required. For Reservations Call: (607) 432-2429 Milford Depot, 136 East Main St., Milford 607-432-2429 www.lrhs.com PLEASE NOTE Organizations interested in having their activities listed FREE please note the following schedule. SPRING ISSUE covers March 25 through July 10. SUMMER ISSUE covers June 25 through October 10 FALL ISSUE covers September 25 through December 10 WINTER ISSUE covers December 10 through April 10 E-mail is acceptable. Send calendar listings to: Kaatskill Life Calendar 56 Main Street, Delhi, NY 13753 OR e mail: info@kaatslife.com OR fax at 607-746 3135 For more information call 607-746-2176 Delaware & Ulster Railroad Arkville, NY 800-225-4132 Open Saturdays and Sundays July 2 - October 30 and Columbus Day 2016 Boarding Pass Options Round-Trip Scenic Train Rides Depart From Arkville and Roxbury: Adult — $18 Senior Citizens— $15 Children (3-12 years)— $12 Train Robbery Special — $35 FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT www.DUrr.org Catskill Mountain Railroad Kingston Pumpkin Patch Trains Oct. 22-23, 29-30 11:00am, 12:30pm, 2:00pm, 3:30pm All trains depart from Westbrook Lane station at Kingston Plaza. Fall Foliage Oct. 28-30 Weekend DEPARTURE TIMES: 11:00 A.M., 1:00 P.M., 3:00 P.M. Fridays Only Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28 DEPARTURE TIMES: 11:00 A.M., 1:00 P.M., 3:00 P.M. All trains depart from Mt. Tremper station on Route 28. Oct. 8-9, 15-16, 22-23 Includes Monday, October, 10, Columbus Day DEPARTURE TIMES: 10:00 A.M., 11:45 A.M., 1:30 P.M., 3:15 P.M. All trains depart from Mt. Tremper station on Route 28. Polar Express returns to Kingston! November 18 through December 26 Hudson Valley children and their families will discover the magic of Christmas aboard The Polar Express™ when it arrives in Kingston, New York, later this year! The officially licensed train rides inspired by the hit Warner Bros. film The Polar Express and book by Chris Van Allsburg, will be run by the Catskill Mountain Railroad from. Set to the sounds of the motion picture soundtrack, pajama-clad passengers will relive the magic of the story and see their favorite characters come to life as they are whisked away aboard The Polar Express on a magical round trip to the North Pole. During the journey, the conductor will punch tickets and chefs will serve hot chocolate, just like in the film. Passengers will also enjoy a sing along and a special reading of the Van Allsburg classic. At the North Pole, Santa will board the train to greet the children and will give a special sleigh bell to all those who believe. Create great family memories aboard The Polar Express! The round trip to the North Pole takes about an hour and a half, so plan accordingly. www.cmmrevents.com
Ulster County Historical Society Museum Rte. 209, Marbletown, 845-338-5614. Ulster Performing Arts Center, The Broadway th...