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Architecture Portfolio by Nora Abuzarifah
Architecture Portfolio by Nora Abuzarifah
Architecture Portfolio by Nora Abuzarifah
Architecture Portfolio by Nora Abuzarifah
Architecture Portfolio by Nora Abuzarifah
Architecture Portfolio by Nora Abuzarifah
Architecture Portfolio by Nora Abuzarifah
Architecture Portfolio by Nora Abuzarifah
Architecture Portfolio by Nora Abuzarifah
Architecture Portfolio by Nora Abuzarifah
Architecture
Projects
Boston
LOCATION
Seaport District, Boston,
MA, U.S.A.
The Roof Gathers
Rainwater
Roof Design Rules
The Site’s Response to
Changing Weather Condition
Triangular Waffle Slab
60’ -70’ Span
Tilted Triangular Waffle
Slab
DESIGN PRINCIPLES
Wood Fins for Shade
Rain Gardens on Site
This Boston water front project is based off of a larger research
scheme that explored the structural extent, limits, and advantages of a
Waffle slab system. The design transformed itself from a basic waffle slab
into folded roof plates. The unique structure consists of multiple triangular
waffle slabs that tilt and mirror their shape into various angles. The roofs
boundaries extend beyond the buildings glass façade, as it cantilevers
and connects itself to the landscape. Where the tilted edges connect,
rainwater gathers and flows into on site rain gardens. It is important to note
here that the roof is a shading device as well, when the weather changes
throughout the year. The roof also mimics the appearance of a floating
object, as it sits on columns and a large glass façade.
The building will grow over time, and change its program according to
current living conditions and site needs. In 100 years Boston’s seaport
district will become a six foot flood zone and the surrounding population’s
growth will increase drastically. This building will sustain itself from the
future flood, by raising its solid walls from the ground up seven feet while
wrapping itself with a wooden dock.
The interior spaces also accommodate for site changing conditions.
As the population grows the building’s program does as well. The build-
ing’s waffle slab floors are built based on only an eight inch waffle slab
grid. The extra four inches of solid flooring can be added or removed
flexibly when needed in the future. The waffle slab spans large distances
with minimal column use. This allows for large open spaces to develop
and partition walls to be added or removed over time, pushing all
columns toward the facade.
This building will adapt itself to different programs, while also keeping
its aesthetic value. It also has the ability to change internally with minimal
effort and construction. As the exterior stays the same and maintains its
visual significance with little maintenance, the building will successfully
sustain any changes headed its way within the near and far future.
COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN
Deeper wood fins are located on the Southeast,
Northwest, and Western facade to provide more
shading.
Wood fins span 45’ from the roof line to expose interior
spaces on the ground floor.
There are three points of entry to the dock; Seaport
Boulevard, the stairs facing the Harborwalk, and the
ramp facing the Harborwalk.
A green wall is placed between the parking lot and the
adjacent exterior seating area.
The roof extends even further as it cantilevers over the
dock to shade it from sun and rain.
A triangular waffle slab provides a repetitive modular
form. Square columns span 60’-70’ and can be
aggregated to the site boundaries for structural support.
Site Context
Seaport Boulevard
(Busy Street)
Fort Point
Channel
Sleeper Street
(Narrow Street)
Harborwalk
Boston Children’s
Museum
Parking Lot
Thin wood fins are located on the North facade and the
shaded South facade to provide minimum shading.
It does this by rotating and mirroring its shape creating a
folded plate.
Column
A large glass facade faces the channel, creating the
appearance of a floating roof.
The roof cantilever is supported by steel columns. The tilted roof and cantilevers direct rain into the rain
gardens.
A skylight facing east is located directly above the
entrance atrium to provide natural light from above.
An elevated walkway is created and raised 7’ above
ground to accommodate for a 100-year storm surge.
The dock also provides a direct pathway from Seaport
Boulevard to the Harborwalk and the Children’s
Museum.
Zoning Restriction
(50’ Offset)
Loading Area
The site acts as an active part of Seaport District.
Programs such as vertical circulation and services are
pushed to the back of the building facing Sleeper Street.
The waffle slabs on the perimeter divide in half to
accommodate for site boundaries.
Structural Columns
Structure + Vertical Circulation
Service
Cellular
Open Plan
Program Diagram
Removable Flooring
On the second and third floor two atrium
spaces are developed. The waffle slabs on
the perimeter of the atrium spaces are
hollow, exposing natural sun light and air to
circulate through the floors. Removable
wood flooring can be placed to cover the
exposed waffle slab, for future development
and changes if needed.
Removable Walls
The site’s open space will develop
changes over time. For this reason room
walls are removable. However, the waffle
slab ceiling is an off shape and requires
angled walls, that create interesting
shaped rooms.
Scenario Planning
The site and building prepares for future
scenarios such as environmental and
programmatic changes. This site will not
only flood over time due to global warm-
ing, but will also adjust itself to change its
programmatic use from a library to a dry
tech lab. As technology begins to bloom
around us the building program does as
well. The interior spaces accommodate
for this change by using removable walls
and floors to do so. However, certain
amenities such as services and vertical
circulation are not removable and will not
change over time.
Sleeper Street
Seaport Boulevard
Second Floor
Library Plan Library Safety Plan
Dry Lab Plan
Dry Lab Life Safety Plan
Scenario Planning
Auditorium
Rare Book Library
Offices
Labs
Egress Stairs
Corten Steel Cladding
Concrete Triangular
Waffle Slab
Reinforcement Bars
Vapor Retarder
Base Plate and
Holding Bolts
1” Wood Cladding
8x8” Steel Column
Curtain Wall Connection
Double Glazed
Window
Pressure Plate, Clamping
Screw, and Gasket.
Timber Fin
Mullion Beam
Roof Connection
Foundation Base + Wall Framework + Rebar +
Soil Fill + Basement Floor
Caisson Foundation
Construction Process
Concrete Slab
Fin Clip
Aluminum Rail
T Mullion Anchor
Rebar
Embedded Unistrut Anchor
Third FloorSecond Floor
Column + Core
Access Floor Detail
Air Supply Vent
Gridded Wood Flooring
12” Concrete Waffle Slab
12” Access Floor Pedestal
Electrical Cables
VAV Vents
Basement
Ground Floor
and Site
Second and
Third Floor
Glazed
Facade
Tent Roof
and Shading
Secondary Internal Stair
Exterior Dock
Perimeter Columns
Rain Garden
Exposed Waffle Structure
Main Stair
Egress Stair
Glazing
Filtering Light
Shade Control
Rain Control
Mechanical Room
10
10
10
55
60
50
40
40
45
40
40
60
50
40
30
35
Rain Paths
Roof Heights
Cantilevered Roof
Measurements in Feet.
Integrated Building Systems
Section Cut
East Boston, Boston,
MA, U.S.A
LOCATION
DESIGN STRATEGIES
Boston
This East Boston water front project will flood in 100 years, thus
development of the urban block scheme will need to accommodate for
this issue by elevating parts of the site. The elevated site houses large
amounts of above ground parking under it, while taking site connections
and program placement into consideration. The block development is a
modular understanding of the fundamental dimensions that inter-relate
buildings and infrastructure, by+ choreographing and composing an
urban interrelationship between architecture, infrastructure, and
landscape.
The site sits between old housing, an interstate highway, two bodies of
water, and a small amount of mixed use program. The developed site
consists of residential units, commercial spaces, office spaces, outdoor
recreational areas, and parking. All commercial and recreational
entrances are accessed above ground level. Parking on the other hand
is placed on street level, under these entrances. This part of the site is
placed north closer to larger existing commercial buildings. It is accessed
by foot through a large ramped threshold entrance that directs
pedestrians from one body of water to the other. Multiple other ramps are
also placed on site in-between side streets.
The other half of the site mostly consists of residential units that inform
a slightly larger and slender shape similar to the existing housing units
surrounding the site. There are two large developed streets available for
use on site as well, that accommodate for two way street access, street
parking, and bike lanes. The first makes connections between the two
bodies of water. The second however, connects adjacent side streets
together and makes onsite parking accessible.
MASTER PLANNING
Waterfront
Connections
Program’s Placed
in Layers
Ramp
Under Ground
Parking
Recreational
Activities Placed
Along Site Pathway
Outdoor
Gathering Spaces
Lane Organization
Level 2
Elevated 15 ft:
A wooden dock that
houses outdoor
recreational facilities
and entrances to
commercial buildings.
Level 1
Elevated 12 ft:
A second floor
parking lot area and
basketball court.
Ground Level
Street level:
Residential building
and wood dock
entrance.
Program
Residential and
Retail Spaces
Retail Spaces
Office, Residential,
and Retail Spaces
Office and
Retail Spaces
B.
6 ft - ( 1st F L O O R P A R K I N G )
A.
Architecture Portfolio by Nora Abuzarifah
Architecture Portfolio by Nora Abuzarifah
G.
H.
Core
Courtyards
Old Naledi, Gaborone,
Botswana, Africa.
Site Rules Set As a Class
Site Rules Set Individually
Gathering Space
Markets on Street Edge
Grid
LOCATION
DESIGN PRINCIPLES
This project provides affordable housing for the Old Naledi labor force
in Africa, using traditional and vernacular building methods and materials,
in order to create a unique window system that allows for semi indoor and
outdoor community gathering spaces. The homes are built with local
resources such as thatch, sand, and dirt. Each housing unit has a stan-
dard design strategy consisting of ventilation, thermal mass, electricity,
and piping. Moreover this project is a community based project that
grounds itself off of participatory architecture as well.
Currently the community is extremely spread out and separated from
one another and essentially must come together again. The site was
once a social community and gathering space for events and everyday
activities, when it was a colony. The Kgotla settlement represents Botswa-
na's historical background, as they previously worked well together.
Different sized gathering spaces were used for different undertakings such
as, grand events for large spaces and everyday activities for smaller
spaces around homes. The gathering spaces promoted the importance
of a social community that is now implemented into this project’s site
using unique prototype windows as a gathering space tool.
The community is well skilled in manual and physical labor work,
providing themselves with the skills and ability to build their own housing
units. The community now has the opportunity to build their own homes
using a few guidelines and rules of thumb from the architect. The architect
produced a master plan for the housing units to potentially populate over
time while not losing the built community gathering spaces on site. The
master plan is a base plan for the local community to build upon, while
creating easy tools for the community to use.
HOUSING SOLUTION
Old Naledi’s ground consists of
mostly sand and dirt. The
material can be used to build
vernacular rammed earth walls,
just as the kgotla settlement once
did before.
Community
Home
Family
Old Site Spaces
OLDER
IN BETWEEN
SPACES
Before the 1970’s Botswana
was a tribal space for the Kgotla
settlement. A tribe that used
court yards as public gathering
spaces for everyday activities
and events.
Community
Home
Family
Home
Family
Trees are an important
symbol in Old Naledi
and they are used for
outdoor shading.
It is really hot in
Gaborone, the
average daylight is 12
hours.
MODIFIED
IN BETWEEN
SPACES
New Site Spaces
Shading
Home
Community
SITE IMPLEMENTATION AND HISTORY
Community
Home
Block
Neighbors
+
Selected Prototype Materials
Man Made
Materials
Neo Vernacular
Materials
Modular
Unit
Component
Pre-Fabricated
Panels
Pre-Fabricated
Panels
Pre-Fabricated
Panels
Community Gathering
Spaces
Block
Gathering Spaces
Semi Private
Outdoor Family Space
Private
Bedroom Space
Semi Private
Indoor Family Space
Semi Private
Kitchen Space
Space Divisions
Nature
Seating
Housing
Community
MODIFIED
IN BETWEEN
SPACES
CURRENT
IN BETWEEN
SPACES
The flipped roof lays flat
for a semi public gathering
space.
Flipping the thatch roof allows for a
different use in materiality. It allows for
a semi indoor/outdoor gathering
space. The top half of the roof is used
for shading while the bottom half is
used as a boundary between public
and private spaces.
Outdoor gathering spaces appear on
every corner in Old Naledi and the
Kgotla settlement.
50 M
100 M
10 M
30 M
2.18 M
5 M
4 M
7 M
P O V E R T Y
( South of Botswana)
W E A L T H
( North of Botswana)
Architecture Portfolio by Nora Abuzarifah
2.5000
Wood beams used for
structural support.
Thatch and wood beams
used for the semi indoor
outside window facade.
Rope is used to close
and open the shutters.
Shared Style Home Plan
Single Family Style Home Plan
Three Beds
Two Beds
One Bed
1.68
3.00
3.00
7.08
Six Beds
Two Beds
Four Beds
0.36
17.1600
3.00
8.08
5.83
1.00
Brick used for ventila-
tion, utility support, and
protection.
Wood columns used for
structural support.
Wood sticks used for
window’s facade.
A
Block Plan
Second level
Wood Dock
Community Gathering
Space
Common Core
B.
D.
Pedestrian Pathway
Semi Indoor/
Outdoor Window
Facade
Community
Garden
Street Level
D.
A.
C.
B.
D.
C.
Shared Stair
Up
Up
7
Up
Up
DESIGN PRINCIPLES
Challenge
Site Design Rules
LOCATION
Back Bay, Boston,
MA, U.S.A.
Three Pools in
One Building
Views
Cantilever
Ceiling Dip
Boston
Twist
This project is a public recreational hub for swimmers and gym
enthusiasts. The design is a creative take on indoor and outdoor swim-
ming pool programs. It places three pools into three separate spaces
within constrained site boundaries. Each space is a unique scheme
through its special site connections in one of Boston’s busiest downtown
districts.
The sports pool sits on the first floor and connects to outdoor spaces
using a large glass sliding door. The Multipurpose pool makes site
connections through a large glass window allowing swimmers to view
cityscape movements while swimming at the same time. The pool sits on
the second floor and can also be viewed on the third floor through large
glass panels around the gymnasium equipment area. The diving pool
sits on the second floor as well and is the most interesting pool on site.
The pool’s deep form is exposed through the ceiling below, creating not
only a pool but a moving piece of art.
The building has multiple ceiling punctures for skylights within these
large pool spaces. In order to achieve this design technique the build-
ing’s second and third floor has to shift slightly cantilevering over the Mass
Ave turn pike. The cantilever not only allows for natural light to enter the
building, but also allows for outdoor shading. This project looks at the site
analysis and its application as an architectural design tool, spatial and
tectonic composition, and building typology analysis.
GYMNASIUM (POOLS)
Up
1
3
4
2
5
3
Up
pU
First Floor
1. Sport pool
2. Lobby
3. Members restroom
4. Food kiosk
5. Small cafe
6. Outside seating
7. Public restroom
8. Multipurpose room
Down Up
Up
Down
1
5
4
3
2
6
7
Down
UP
1
2
3
6
6
7
8
5
4
8
8
8
8
5
Down
Down
Down
Up
8
5
7
6
Turnpike’s interaction
with the building.
Mass Ave’s interaction
with the building.
UP
Down
Down
The second and third
floor twist and cantilever
on top of the Turnpike.
Second Floor
1. Diving pool
2. Multipurpose pool
3. Locker room 1
4. Locker room 2
5. Waiting area 1
6. Waiting area 2
7. Outside seating
Third Floor
1. Large cafe
2. Kitchen
3. Restroom 3
4. Restroom 4
5. Fitness area
6. Training room
7. Offices
Landscape
Project
Architecture Portfolio by Nora Abuzarifah
LOCATION
DESIGN PRINCIPLES
“These huge workings of the earth are a cultural and ideological Coloniza-
tion of the first nature, making out a space of second nature by which
early civilizations could accommodate themselves to their environment...
with pole, stone, or tree.” - Dixon Hunt
This landscape development is a Restoration Park project, which sits in
the heart of Waltham’s downtown train station and the ambient Charles
River. It analyzes and incorporates the different stages of the natural
landscape that surrounds the site. It is intended to be an interactive gath-
ering space that encourages the act of human interaction with nature.
The surrounding site has the three stages of nature based on the
research and understandings of John Dixon Hunt. A human’s touch is
what breaks down nature into these three stages. The first stage of nature
is an untouched space. It is a space humans have not colonized or
changed. The second stage of nature is this gradual change in space,
humans add certain elements to this nature’s original form. The third stage
of nature is when a human’s touch dominates nature’s original form. This
transition of space happens gradually through time. The site itself however
is neither a first, second, nor a third nature, it is a fourth phase.
The site is a nature that permits wild life into a city space. The site
develops a second sense of nature by placing community gardens
throughout the site. It also places three wooden pavilions along the site
that gradually get larger. The material aesthetically matches the type of
material used across the river at the old factory. Between each pavilion,
natural wild life still lives as greenery surrounds the walk way path and the
river.
The site along the Charles River has a pedestrian pathway and bike
trail that follows along the river side. Adjacent to the site is a factory built in
1814 that has kept its sentimental value and unique character. This site
sits behind a train track as well.
1st Nature
Urban Wild
2nd Nature
Programed Nature
3rd Nature
Shaped Nature
4th Nature
City + Nature
High Density Area
Buildings Interacting
With River Edge
Waltham, MA,
U.S.A.
URBAN ECOLOGY
Site Research
Design Elements
Pavillions
Community and
Phytoremediation
Garden
Farmers
Market
Pavilion
C
Dock
Flower Shop
Commercial
Building
Community
Garden
Phytoremediation
Garden
Green
Wall
Cafe
Entrance
Pavilion A
Pavilion B
Water Hyssop:
lead, mercury,
and chromium.
Hydrangeas:
aluminum.
Water Hyacinth:
cadmium, chromium,
mercury, and lead.
Sun Flower:
aluminum.
Kale:
lead.
The community garden, phytore-
mediation garden, farmers market,
and flower shop are all linked to one
another. They are all run by local
community members that care for the
space themselves and shape the site
into a gathering space that links
nature’s growth to the community.
Phytoremediation
Garden
An Abstract Video
The three phases of nature.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLhcKMNiCfo
Form
Out Door Rooms
Spatial Extrusion
Multimedia
Projects
Architecture Projects  Comprehensive Design Page 5-18  Master Planning Page 19-26  Up  Up  7  Up  Up  Housing Solution Pag...
Architecture Projects  Comprehensive Design Page 5-18  Master Planning Page 19-26  Up  Up  7  Up  Up  Housing Solution Pag...
Architecture Portfolio by Nora Abuzarifah
Architecture Portfolio by Nora Abuzarifah
Architecture Portfolio by Nora Abuzarifah