simplebooklet thumbnail

of 0
NAPTIME
BY: KASSANDRA KOZIEL
KNKOZIEL@MAIL.MCCNEB.EDU
0678168
CHILDREN WITH EXCEPTIONALITIES ECED 2050
KATIE SICHENEDER
MCC
OCTOBER 16, 2017
PREFACE
This book is called Naptime and is intended for ages 2 through preschool. It talks about the
behaviors appropriate during naptime so as not to disturb the other children trying to rest, and
talks about how their actions may cause a child to feel. Some children have a hard time
winding down and respecting others who are trying to sleep in the middle of the day. This
book gives examples of other activities the child can do such as reading a book to stay quiet.
The skills learned in this story include: listening skills, quiet skills, and social skills. To read
this book you must go in order starting from page one. Pictures are included for visual
representation of what is expected.
AT NAPTIME WE FIND GET OUR BLANKETS FROM
OUR CUBBIES, FIND OUR COT, LAY DOWN, AND
ARE QUIET.
I WILL LAY THERE QUIETLY. IF I DO NOT WANT TO
SLEEP I MAY READ A BOOK OR DRAW A PICTURE.
I MAY ASK MS. KASSANDRA TO PAT/RUB MY BACK
TO HELP ME FALL ASLEEP IF I WOULD LIKE.
WHEN I AM LOUD, THE OTHER CHILDREN AND MS.
KASSANDRA GET UPSET. THE OTHER CHILDREN
WILL NOT BE ABLE TO SLEEP.
WHEN WE ARE QUIET AND ALLOW FOR EVERYONE
TO REST, WE MAKE EVERYONE HAPPY FOR THE
ACTIVITIES TO COME.
EXTENSIONS
As a teacher, it can be difficult to get children to listen especially during naptime. It is
important to be consistent and reiterate what is expected of children during certain times of the
day. Repetition is the key. Ask questions to make sure the child understands what is expected
and let you know that they understand what you are saying. If these solutions in this book do
not help, perhaps you could sit down with that child and come up with a plan, routine, or
activity together to get the child to stay quiet and respect their peers who are trying to sleep.
REFERENCES
Sleeping Expectations [Personal interview]. (2017, October 14).