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Proteins

Fats

Nutrition Book

Minerals

Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates are the sugars, starches, and fibers found in fruits, grains, vegetables and milk products. Carbohydrates are your body's main source of energy they help fuel your brain, kidneys, heart, muscles and central nervous system. Your body breaks down all carbohydrates into sugar. The outcome is glucose, and this is what gives your body energy. Food with complex, good carbohydrates, such as quinoa and oatmeal, contain a lot of fiber so your body breaks them down slowly. This keeps you feeling full and stabilizes your blood sugar levels. The dietary guidelines recommend that carbs provide 45 to 65 percent of your daily calorie intake. So if you eat a 2000-calorie diet, you should aim for about 225 to 325 grams of carbs per day. But if you need to lose weight, you will get much faster results eating around 50 to 150 grams of carbs. Interesting fact: A carbohydrate has 4 calories per gram.

Carbohydrates

A natural oily or greasy substance occurring in animal bodies, especially when deposited as a layer under the skin or around certain organs. Dietary fats are essential to give your body energy and to support cell growth. They also help protect your organs and help keep your body warm. Fats help your body absorb some nutrients and produce important hormones, too. Eating foods rich in trans fats increases the amount of harmful LDL cholesterol in the bloodstream and reduces the amount of beneficial HDL cholesterol. Trans fats create inflammation, which is linked to heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and other chronic conditions. The latest Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends keeping saturated fat to less than 10 percent of calories a day. Interesting Fact: saturated fat is also found in tropical oils, like palm kernel or coconut oil. Unsaturated fats are usually liquid at room temperature and are found in vegetable oils. There are two main types of unsaturated fats, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats.

Fats

Any of a class of nitrogenous organic compounds that consist of large molecules composed of one or more long chains of amino acids and are an essential part of all living organisms, especially as structural components of body tissues such as muscle, hair, collagen, etc., and as enzymes and antibodies. Your body uses protein to build and repair tissues. You also use protein to make enzymes, hormones, and other body chemicals. Protein is an important building block of bones, muscles, cartilage, skin, and blood. When you down a steak, chicken breast, or any other source of the muscle builder, you also take in nitrogen, which is naturally occurring in the amino acids that make up proteins. When you're consuming a normal amount of protein, you excrete the nitrogen—no harm, no foul. But when you eat a ton of the stuff, your kidneys have to go into overdrive to get rid of all the extra nitrogen. You should consume about 0.45 grams of protein per pound for men and 0.35 grams of protein per pound for women. Interesting Fact: protein is a long chain-like molecule that is made up of small units known as amino acids, joined together by peptide bonds.

Protein

A group of organic compounds that are essential for normal growth and nutrition and are required in small quantities in the diet because they cannot be synthesized by the body. 

Vitamins

A solid inorganic substance of natural occurrence. 

Minerals

A colorless, transparent, odorless, tasteless liquid that forms the seas, lakes, rivers, and rain and is the basis of the fluids of living organisms. 

Water