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FunCation Kindergarten Lesson Plan Sampler
Thank you for trying our Lesson Plan Sampler! Here are a few
quick tips before you begin.
1. This Lesson Plan Sampler contains five (5) Kindergarten lessons, Reading, Writing, Math, Science, and
Social Studies.
2. Please read through the complete lesson before you begin teaching. (Some lessons require a little prep work
before you can teach).
3. Each lesson includes additional resources, such as an instructional/introduction video, worksheets, and
activities and/or games to enhance the lesson.
Disclaimer
FunCation Academy is not the original author of any lesson plans. We compiled and modified free online lesson
plans and free additional third-party resources to create homeschool friendly easy-to-use lesson plans. You do
not have to become a member to use our lesson plans, we share 3 lesson plans every month via our newsletter.
Subject
Reading
Title
Letter Name Recognition – Aa
Lesson Objective
The student will be able to identify, name, and write the capital and lowercase letters Aa.
Background Information for Teacher
Display the mnemonic card for Aa for reference throughout the lesson. All words in bold will be said aloud by the teacher.
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Aa mnemonic card or complete mnemonic alphabet poster
Student Page 1 (Step 3)
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Take a look at this letter. It is the letter A. Say it with me this time: A. Point to the capital letter A and say: This is the capital
letter A. Capital letters are tall letters. Look at the capital letter A (point to the capital A mnemonic). Does it have straight lines
or curved lines? Remind the student of the difference between straight and curved lines if necessary, and confirm that the capital A
contains only straight lines.
That’s right. The capital A has straight lines. I see two tall lines that make a point at the top, like an anthill. I can picture the
ants coming out of the top of the anthill to help me remember. Notice that there is a short straight line across the middle of
the capital A. Point to this.
Point to the lowercase letter a
and say: This is the lowercase letter a. This lowercase letter is a short letter. The lowercase a
looks very different from the capital A, but they are the same letter. Let’s talk about how the lowercase a looks different from the
capital A. Can you tell me a way that the capital A and lowercase a look different? Pause for the student to response. (The
lowercase a is shorter; the lowercase a is round; the capital A has only straight lines, while the lowercase a has a mix of straight and
curved lines.) Affirm correct student response.
Since the lowercase a is round, it reminds me of an apple. That helps me remember what the lowercase a looks like when I
write it. Now I will show you how to write the letter a. Let’s start with the capital A. Watch me first. Demonstrate how to write
capital A on the board or on paper while indicating start points and directionality. Then lead the student in tactile/kinesthetic ways to
write the A, such as air writing or on the palm of their hands. It is suggested that you have lines already on a board or piece of paper
to indicate the baseline, midline, and top line.
1. To write capital A, I start at the top line. I pull my pencil diagonally down left and stop at the baseline.
2. I pick up my pencil and go all the way back to where I started at the top. Now I pull my pencil diagonally down
right and stop at the baseline.
3. I pick up my pencil and put it on the first line I wrote at the midline. You may need to explicitly point this area out
to the student. This is the little line that goes across the capital A. I just push my pencil straight across on the
midline until it touches the other side of the A.
4. Remember, we always read what we write: A. Touch under the letter to demonstrate one-to-one.
5. Now I have written capital A!
This time, you will practice writing a capital A with me, but we will write it in the air. Remember to look at the A I wrote if you
need help. Turn your back to the student to air-write the letter, or write it backward if you face the student.
1. If you model air-writing the letter facing the student and do not start on the left, then students may learn to form the
letter with the wrong directionality.
2. As you are modeling the air-written letter, narrate the movements clearly as you are doing them. Use the same
language each time so the student can create an internal monologue of the letter formation.
The student may hold the pencil to air-write.
1. Get your pencils ready to air-write capital A! Model how to hold the pencil in the air.
2. Where should we start when we write capital A? Do we start at the top or the bottom? (top) Get your pencil
ready at the top of your air-paper.
3. Pull diagonally down left and stop at the baseline. Pick up your pencil and go back to where you started.
4. Pull diagonally down right and stop at the baseline.
5. Go to the midline and across.
6. Let’s read the letter we wrote: A. Touch under the letter when reading it.
7. You’ve written a capital A!
Repeat this process a couple of times. Repeat the process with the student “writing” with their pointer finger on the palm of their
other hand while iterating the steps to engage tactile modality.
Repeat the modeling, air-writing, and palm-writing with lowercase a.
1. To write lowercase a, I don’t need to start at the top line because lowercase a is a short letter. It is also a
curvy letter, so watch carefully while I model how to write it.
2. I start on the midline. Then I pull left and around like a circle back up to where I started and stop.
3. I pick up my pencil and put it at the midline on the right side of the circle.
4. Pull straight down to the baseline and stop.
5. Now I need to read the letter I wrote: a. Touch under the letter to demonstrate one-to-one.
6. Now I have written a lowercase a!
Have the student complete the Student Practice Page
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets needed to complete the lesson
Step 4: Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can
demonstrate understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Noodle and Yarn Writing: Provide the student with uncooked straight noodles that have been broken to the appropriate lengths. The
student will use glue to glue the straight noodles onto paper to make a capital A. The student will glue shorter straight noodles and
yarn onto the paper to make a lowercase a
. Once the letters are dry, students can trace the letters with their finger.

Subject
Writing
Title
Dots and Spots
Lesson Objective
In this writing prompt, students will demonstrate comprehension and through writing and illustration. Students will also develop their
rhyming skills.
Background Information for Teacher
Words in bold are said by the teacher.
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Paper
Pencil
Dots and Spots book (Step 1)
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Read Story
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)

Click Read Story for the online book to appear.

 

Step 2: Teach Lesson
Writing Prompt 1
After reading Dots and Spots, compare and contrast spots and dots. Write or illustrate how spots and dots are alike and
different.
Writing Prompt 2
In Dots and Spots, the spots were caused by dripping ice cream. Have you ever had spots on your clothes? Write or illustrate
how you got spots on your clothes and what you did to get the spots off of your clothes.
Writing Prompt 3
Using spots and dots, draw a picture and then describe it. Tell about the colors and the sizes of the spots and dots you used to
create this picture.
Editing Checklist
Did you remember to. . .
Write your uppercase and lowercase letters so that they can be easily read by a classmate or teacher?
Use complete sentences?
End each sentence with a punctuation mark?
Begin each sentence with a capital letter?
Discuss the following questions:
What was your favorite part?
What part was confusing?
How could it be improved?
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Rhyming worksheet for extra practice
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
What rhymes with Bell? (offline) worksheet

Subject
Math
Title
Counting Backwards (20-0)
Lesson Objective
Students will be able to (1) orally count backwards from 20-0 and (2) write numbers backwards from 20-0 in order.
Background Information for Teacher
N/A
Student Prior Knowledge
Student should be able to recognize numbers 0-20.
Materials:
Pencil
Marker
Ten stickers
21 pieces of large construction paper with a number (from 0-20) written in large print on each
index cards
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
The student can be seated on the rug close to the teacher. The teacher will begin by showing the student a sheet of stickers. There
should be 10 stickers on the sheet (stickers can be substituted with many other items). Together, the student and teacher will count
the stickers starting from 1 up to 10.
One by one, teacher will give a sticker to the student. After each sticker is removed, teacher will ask “How many stickers to do we
have left”?
By the time all stickers are passed out, the student would have counted down from 10-0.
Refer to a number line (or something similar) in the room. Notice how numbers get “bigger/greater” when counting forward and
“smaller/less” when counting backwards. Use hand/body gestures to refer to forward and backward.
Write the words “less”, “take-away” and “backwards” on the board or display the words on a pocket chart. Ask the student to tell you
what they know about those words. Together, chorally practice counting backwards from 20-0 as teachers points to each number on
the number line. Teacher can physically move backwards as the student count to show the relation.
Teacher should place pieces of large construction paper with one number (in order from 20-0) written in large print on each. The
student will pull small index card with a “mystery number” (0-20) written on it. The student will find their number on the construction
paper number line on the floor. They will then begin hopping/counting backwards from their mystery number.
Repeat until the student has pulled all the cards.
Recall sticker activity from the lesson's opening. Review the lesson with students. Ask students, "what did we learn about numbers
today"? Count backwards with students. Ask for questions.
Have the student complete the worksheet is Step 3.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets needed to complete the lesson
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
I Spy Number Counting (online game)

Subject
Science
Title
Animal Classification
Lesson Objective
Students sort pictures or small plastic animals into groups and classify animals as to where they live; whether they have scales,
feathers, or hair; and whether they have hands, wings, flippers, or fins.
Background Information for Teacher
Classification is an important science skill. In kindergarten, students will begin to learn to classify animals by sorting them into groups.
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
This lab can be completed as stations in which one set of each supply is needed or you can make multiple sets of all three activities.
Animal sorting pages pdf.
For activity 1: If you have a supply of small plastic animals they can be used here. If not, you can find pictures. Find at least 5
animals for each environment.
For activity 2: Pictures work best because the students can observe the animal’s outer covering more easily. Find at least 5
pictures for each outer covering. A great source of pictures is old copies of Ranger Rick, Backyard Barn, or National
Geographic.
For activity 3: Pictures again work best. Find at least 4 pictures for each type of appendage.
Animal Classification Sheet pdf.
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Show the student the sorting pages. Have the student give examples of animals with hair/fur, scales, and feathers. Discuss different
types of animal appendages and ask for examples of animals with hands, fins, flippers, and wings. Finally, show the student the three
environments and ask for animals that would live in each of them.
1. Animals that live on land, in the water, or both. The student will use an assortment of small plastic animals and place them on
their proper environment page. Have the student decide where they think the animal lives; then, verify if the animal was
placed appropriately.
2. Animals that have scales, feathers or hair/fur. The student will use an assortment of pictures of animals and place them on
either a scale, feather, or fur page. Have the student decide what type of covering they think the animal pictured has; then,
verify if the picture was placed appropriately.
3. Animals that have hands, wings, flippers, or fins. The student will use an assortment of pictures of animals and place them on
either a hand, wing, flipper, or fin page. Have the student decide what type of appendage they think the animal pictured has;
then, verify if the picture was placed appropriately.
4. Have the student complete the Animal Classification Sheet.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets needed to complete the lesson
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Animal Trading Cards Art Activity
(The student can draw or cut out pictures of the animals learned on the previous lesson)

Subject
Social Studies
Title
We Are All Different in Many Ways!
Lesson Objective
This activity focuses on being an individual and reminds students that it is okay to be different.
Background Information for Teacher
N/A
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
The Black Crayon flannel board story (pdf)
The Crayon Box That Talked
, written by Shane Derolf and Michael Letzig
Crayons (separate blacks from the rest of the colors)
Paper (two sheets per student)
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Place empty crayon boxes on the tables with only the black crayons left for the student to draw.
1. Have the student draw a colorful picture with only the black crayon.
2. Talk about how our world would be if we only had a black crayon.
3. How would our world be if we all looked alike?
4. Invite the student to the reading area and read The Black Crayon flannel board story (Step 3)
.
5. Talk about how even the black crayon is important and so are we in different ways.
6. Read The Crayon Box That Talked
.
7. Talk about how each crayon is important even though they look different.
8. Invite the student back to his/her seat and have him/her draw another picture with all the crayons.

Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets needed to complete the lesson
All about me worksheets
Step 4: Review- Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Extension: Take your crayons and draw the people outside your family that help you. You can also cut from a magazine as shown
below.
Help your child illustrate a picture of people outside of your family helping them (such as a
teacher, grocery seller, doctor, neighbor, or grandparent). Give them language they can use
to ask for help and express their gratitude for this help (“Will you help please?” and “Thank
you”). Discuss how humans are all part of one big family, and we should treat each other as
such.
If you look at the people in your community, you will see everyone looks different. Eyes,
noses, skin color, even clothes make people unique. Everyone is beautiful in their own way
and together we are like a garden of many different flowers. Draw unity in diversity and find
beauty in the variety of differences. It may be a natural time to also discuss the various
countries your friends come from as well.
Submit your final completed activity and *earn $5 FunBucks!
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