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Grade 4
Grammar
PRACTICE BOOK
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© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Contents
Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Types of Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Test: Types of Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Review: Sentences and Punctuation Marks . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Sentence Subjects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Sentence Predicates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Test: Subjects and Predicates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Review: Subjects and Predicates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Combining Sentences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Combining Subjects and Predicates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Test: Combining Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Review: Combining Sentences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Complex Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Complex Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
Test: Complex Sentences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Review: Complex Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Run-on Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
Run-on Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Test: Run-on Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Review: Run-on Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31, 32
Mysteries
The Mystery of the
Missing Lunch
Adapting to Survive
A Walk in the Desert
Our National Parks
Time For Kids:
Our National Parks
Astronauts
The Astronaut
and the Onion
Wildlife Watchers
The Raft
Unit Review
Unit 1 • Lets Explore
iii
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Baseball
Mighty Jackie
New Places, New Faces
My Diary from Here
to There
Focus on China
Time For Kids:
Stealing Beauty
Bright Ideas
How Ben Franklin Stole
the Lightning
Snakes
Dear Mr. Winston
Unit Review
Common Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
Proper Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
Test: Common and Proper Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
Review: Common and Proper Nouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
Singular and Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Forming Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42
Test: Singular and Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Review: Singular and Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
Irregular Plural Nouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
Irregular Plural Nouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Test: Irregular Plural Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
Review: Irregular Plural Nouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Possessive Nouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Plural Possessive Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Test: Singular and Plural Possessive Nouns . . . . . . . . . .55
Review: Singular and Plural Possessive Nouns . . . . . . .56
Plural and Possessive Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Plural and Possessive Nouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Test: Plurals and Possessives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Review: Plural and Possessive Nouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63, 64
Unit 2 • Take A Stand
iv
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Unit 3 • Making A Difference
Friend or Foe?
Roadrunner’s Dance
People Who Made
a Difference
My Brother Martin
Kids Get It Done
Time For Kids:
Kid Reporters at Work
Great Plains Indians
Mystic Horse
Precipitation
Snowfl ake Bentley
Unit Review
Action Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65
Action Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
Test: Action Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Review: Action Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Past-Tense Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Future-Tense Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Test: Verb Tenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Review: Verb Tenses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Main and Helping Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77
Main and Helping Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
Test: Main and Helping Verbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Review: Main and Helping Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Linking Verbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Linking Verbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Test: Linking Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Review: Linking Verbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
Irregular Verbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Irregular Verbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Test: Irregular Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93
Review: Irregular Verbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95, 96
v
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Unit 4 • Viewpoints
Mans Best Friend
Dear Mrs. LaRue
Creative Solutions
The Blind Hunter
Energy: Power Sources
Time For Kids:
The Power of Oil: What
Makes Oil So Valuable
and Also So Challenging
Whales
Adelina’s Whales
The Sea
At Home in the Coral Reef
Unit Review
Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97
Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Test: Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Review: Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Subject and Object Pronouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Refl exive Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Test: Subject and Object Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Review: Subject and Object Pronouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Pronoun-Verb Agreement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
Pronoun-Verb Agreement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Test: Pronoun-Verb Agreement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Review: Pronoun-Verb Agreement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Possessive Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Possessive Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118
Test: Possessive Pronouns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Review: Possessive Pronouns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
Pronouns and Homophones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Pronouns and Contraction Homophones. . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
Test: Pronouns and Homophones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Review: Pronouns and Homophones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127, 128
vi
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Unit 5 • Relationships
Going to the Library
Because of Winn-Dixie
Putting on a Play
Ranita, the Frog Princess
Explorations
Time For Kids: Exploring
the Undersea Territory
Artists at Work
Me and Uncle Romie
Wild Horses
Wild Horses
Unit Review
Adjectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Proper Adjectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Test: Common and Proper Adjectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
Review: Common and Proper Adjectives . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Articles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Articles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Test: Articles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Review: Articles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Adjectives that Compare. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
Adjectives that Compare. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Test: Adjectives that Compare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Review: Adjectives that Compare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Comparing with More and Most . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Comparing with More and Most . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Test: Comparing with More and Most . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Review: More Comparing with More and Most . . . . . . . 152
Comparing with Good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Comparing with Bad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
Test: Comparing with Good and Bad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Review: Comparing with Good and Bad . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159, 160
vii
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Unit 6 • Discovery
The Gold Rush
The Gold Rush Game
Wild Visitors
The Cricket
in Times Square
Discovering Nature’s
Secret
Time For Kids: Meet a
Bone-ifi ed Explorer
Airplanes
My Brothers’
Flying Machine
Ants
The Life and Times
of the Ant
Unit Review
Adjectives vs. Adverbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Adverbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Test: Adverbs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
Review: Adverbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Adverbs That Compare. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Adverbs That Compare. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
Test: Adverbs That Compare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Review: Adverbs That Compare. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Negatives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
Negatives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Test: Negatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
Review: Negatives. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
Prepositions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
Prepositional Phrases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Test: Prepositions and Prepositional Phrases . . . . . . . . 183
Review: Prepositions and Prepositional Phrases . . . . . 184
Combining Sentences with Prepositional Phrases . . . . 185
Combining Sentences with Prepositional Phrases . . . . 186
Mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Proofreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
Test: Combining Sentences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Review: Combining Sentences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191, 192
viii
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Write sentence, question, or fragment for each group of words. Write
each group of words as a sentence with the correct punctuation.
1. the cat feeds her kittens
2. is very hungry today
3. his lunch bag is missing
4. did you bring your lunch
5. he ate a tuna  sh sandwich
6. because he likes tuna  sh
7. what else do you think he likes
8. the cat ate a worm
• A sentence is a group of words that express a complete thought.
A sentence fragment is a group of words that does not
express a complete thought.
• A statement is a sentence that tells something.
• A question is a sentence that asks something.
All sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a period
or question mark.
Sentences
Name
The Mystery of the Missing Lunch
Grade 4/ Unit 1
1
At Home: Have your child write sentences and questions
about mysteries.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
A statement is a sentence that tells something. It ends with
a period. .
A question is a sentence that asks something. It ends with a
question mark. ?
A command tells or asks someone to do something. It ends
with a period. .
An exclamation shows strong feeling. It ends with an
exclamation mark. !
Write each sentence with the correct punctuation.
1. Are you sure you brought your lunch
2. Maybe Jack took it
3. Class, stay in your seats
4. Don’t you dare say I stole it
5. Have you seen a stray cat in the building
6. Cats like eating sh
7. I can’t believe the cat took the sandwich
8. Do you think we should feed the cat each day
Types of Sentences
The Mystery of the Missing Lunch
Grade 4/ Unit 1
2
At Home: Have your child think of his or her favorite animal
and write a statement, a question, a command, and an
exclamation about it.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Every sentence begins with a capital letter.
A question ends with a question mark.
A statement or a command ends with a period.
An exclamation ends with an exclamation mark.
Read each sentence. Rewrite it with the correct capital letters
and punctuation.
1. I’m starving
2. are you allergic to cats
3. mother cats protect their kittens
4. let me know if you  nd out who did it
5. he was glad the mystery was solved
6. don’t jump to conclusions
7. who brought the peanut butter and jelly
8. wow, this is a great cat
Mechanics
The Mystery of the Missing Lunch
Grade 4/ Unit 1
3
At Home: Read different kinds of sentences aloud. Ask your
child how to punctuate each sentence.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Read the passage. Think about what type of sentence each one
is. Then rewrite the passage using the correct punctuation.
when our cat had her kitten, we did not know
what we would do a grown-up cat can be left by
itself a baby kitten needs someone to watch her
who could we get to care for her all day long I
go to school all day mom and Dad go to work all
day could Grandpa take the kitten grandpa said
he could now the kitten lives with Grandpa We
visit them every weekend It’s wonderful
• A sentence is a group of words that express a complete thought.
A sentence fragment is a group of words that does not
express a complete thought.
• A statement is a sentence that tells something.
• A question is a sentence that asks something.
All sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a period
or question mark.
Proofreading
The Mystery of the Missing Lunch
Grade 4/ Unit 1
4
At Home: Watch TV with your child. Repeat a line a
character speaks and determine how the line would be
punctuated in writing.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
A. Decide if each sentence is a statement, a question, a command, or
an exclamation. Write what type of sentence each is.
1. His favorite sandwich is salami.
2. Can you lend me a dollar?
3. Don’t forget your lunch.
4. The kittens are hiding.
5. What a funny story!
6. That stain looks like mustard.
B. Write each sentence with the correct punctuation.
7. I thought Jack took my lunch
8. Did you ever make a mistake like that
9. Cats are my favorite pets
10. I don’t have any money
11. Wow, I can’t believe the cat ate my lunch
12. Bring the kittens to my of ce
Test: Types
of Sentences
The Mystery of the Missing Lunch
Grade 4/ Unit 1
5
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Write each sentence with the correct capital letters and punctuation.
1. where is the mother cat
2. give me the sandwich, please
3. hey, you solved the mystery
4. I like peanut butter and jelly
5. what’s going on here
6. My cat stole one of my socks
7. Where do you think I found it
8. It was in my cat’s bed
A statement is a sentence that tells something. It ends with
a period. .
A question is a sentence that asks something. It ends with a
question mark. ?
A command tells or asks someone to do something. It ends
with a period. .
An exclamation shows strong feeling. It ends with an
exclamation mark. !
Review: Sentences and
Punctuation Marks
The Mystery of the Missing Lunch
Grade 4/ Unit 1
6
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
The subject of a sentence is the person, place, or thing the
sentence tells about.
The complete subject includes all the words in the subject.
The simple subject is usually a noun or a pronoun—the
main word or words in the complete subject.
A compound subject has two or more nouns that make up
the subject.
Turn these sentence fragments into complete sentences by
adding a subject. Write each complete sentence on the line.
1. are very dry.
2. live for 200 years!
3. come out at night.
4. come out during the day.
5. are reading about deserts.
6. caught the lizard.
7. are eaten by coyotes.
8. is dangerous.
Sentence Subjects
A Walk in the Desert • Grade 4/ Unit 1
7
At Home: Together, read sentences from books, magazines,
or newspapers. Help your child identify the subject of each.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
The predicate tells what the subject does or did.
The complete predicate includes all the words in the
predicate.
The simple predicate is the verb—the action word or words
or linking verb in the complete predicate.
A compound predicate has two or more verbs.
Turn these fragments into complete sentences by adding a
predicate. Write each complete sentence on the line.
1. Plants in the deserts
2. Most spiders
3. Dangerous scorpions
4. A quick coyote
5. Hungry lizards
6. The spines of a cactus
7. On their  eld trip, the students
8. Animals that come out at night
Sentence Predicates
A Walk in the Desert • Grade 4/ Unit 1
8
At Home: Together, read sentences from books, magazines,
or newspapers. Help your child identify the predicate of each.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
The subject of a sentence tells whom or what the sentence is
about.
The predicate of a sentence tells what the subject does or is.
You can sometimes correct a sentence fragment by adding a
subject or a predicate.
Read these sentence fragments and turn them into complete
sentences by adding a subject or predicate.
1. This desert
2. Walked a long way
3. Heard the wind in the distance
4. The coyote on the hill
5. Was very thirsty
6. A scorpion
7. The kids and their parents
8. Looked for water
Mechanics
A Walk in the Desert • Grade 4/ Unit 1
9
At Home: With your child, write sentence fragments on
a piece of paper. Exchange papers and add a subject or
predicate to each fragment.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
A complete sentence contains both a subject and a
predicate.
You can sometimes correct a sentence fragment by adding a
subject or a predicate.
Rewrite the advertisement. Correct the
sentence fragments, punctuation, and
capitalization.
A brand new video “Desert Adventure”
must find water in the desert. Scorpions
and coyotes will be after you. is there
water behind the mesquite trees. Watch out
for A rattlesnake can you escape them
all? Enjoy the excitement of This game
Proofreading
A Walk in the Desert • Grade 4/ Unit 1
10
At Home: Read your child’s rewrite of the above
advertisement. Ask your child which sentences have simple
or compound subjects or predicates.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
A. Draw a line separating the complete subject from the complete
predicate in each sentence. Then write the simple subject and the
simple predicate on the line.
example: A cactus | stores water. cactus, stores
1. Desert weather is very dry.
2. Wood rats in the desert build huge nests.
3. The skin of a lizard seals water inside it.
4. The mother carried her babies.
5. Deserts get cooler at night.
B. Write the subject and predicate in each sentence below.
6. John packed some snacks and drank lots of water.
Simple Subject:
Compound Predicate:
7. Roadrunners and scorpions live in the desert.
Compound Subject:
Simple Predicate:
8. The spider spun a web and caught the insect.
Simple Subject:
Compound Predicate:
9. Rabbits and coyotes run very fast.
Compound Subject:
Simple Predicate:
10. The darkness and cool air refresh me at night.
Compound Subject:
Simple Predicate:
Test: Subjects
and Predicates
A Walk in the Desert • Grade 4/ Unit 1
11
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Look at the picture below. Add a subject or a predicate to each
sentence describing the picture.
1.
gives some shade.
2. Prickly cacti
3. The
was ready to strike.
4. A bird called a roadrunner
5.
are in the desert.
Review: Subjects
and Predicates
The subject is the person, place, or thing a sentence tells
about.
The simple subject is a noun—the main word or words in the
complete subject.
The predicate tells what the subject does or did.
The simple predicate is the verb—the action word or words in
the complete predicate.
A Walk in the Desert • Grade 4/ Unit 1
12
Name
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
A simple sentence contains one subject and one predicate.
It contains one complete thought.
Two simple sentences may be joined to form a compound
sentence, which contains two subjects and two predicates.
It contains two complete thoughts.
A conjunction is used to combine the two sentences. And,
but, and or are conjunctions.
Add a comma followed by and, but, or or to combine each pair of
simple sentences into one compound sentence.
1. Elks have come back to the park. Wolves have returned, too.
2. I would like to visit the park often. I live far too away.
3. Visitors like the  owers in the park. They should not pick them.
4. You can look at the geysers in the park. You can enjoy the waterfalls
instead.
5. I love Yellowstone Park. My brother prefers the beach.
6. My aunt came with me to the park. She said it was beautiful.
Combining Sentences
Our National Parks • Grade 4/ Unit 1
13
At Home: Talk about the kind of park your child would like
to see.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
A compound subject contains two or more simple subjects
that have the same predicate.
My mother and my sister looked at the map.
A compound predicate contains two or more simple
predicates that have the same subject.
The leaves fall and cover the ground.
You can join two sentences that have two subjects or two
predicates with the word and or or.
Combine each pair of sentences to form one sentence.
1. Some logs are 100 feet long. They are very colorful.
2. Rainwater boils. It turns to steam.
3. Old Faithful is a geyser. So is the Giantess.
4. Water shoots up in geysers. It bubbles in ponds.
5. The elks made a long journey. The elks traveled 2,500 miles.
6. Elks live in the park. Bears live in the park.
7. Forest  res burn in the park. They affect millions of acres.
8. My dad likes camping. So does my sister.
Combining Subjects
and Predicates
Our National Parks • Grade 4/ Unit 1
14
At Home: Talk about national parks or another subject. As
you talk, ask your child to create compound sentences.
Name
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Use a comma before and, but, or or when you join two
sentences to form a compound sentence.
Do not use a comma before and when you combine two
subjects or two predicates.
Use and, or, or but to combine two sentences into a compound
sentence. Or, use and or or to combine subjects or predicates.
1. My family loves camping. I prefer reading indoors.
2. A volcano steams. A volcano erupts.
3. Mom likes to hike. I come with her.
4. A moose might walk by. A wolf might walk by.
5. Fire burned some of the park. Other parts were untouched.
6. Karen went hiking. I’m going with her next time.
7. The Lower Falls are well known. Others don’t even have a name.
8. Serena is camping. Maria is camping.
Mechanics
Our National Parks • Grade 4/ Unit 1
15
At Home: With your child, look for examples of compound
sentences. Ask your child to tell you what simple sentences
were combined.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
You can combine two sentences by using and, but, or or.
You can combine two sentences by joining two subjects or
two predicates with and or or.
Read the passage. Think about how two sentences are joined.
Then rewrite the passage using the correct punctuation.
I enjoyed reading about Yellowstone National Park and I learned a lot
from the book. at Yellowstone, you can see wolves or you might notice
elks. I have been camping many times but I never saw those animals.
the book describes geysers and forests. my family has never been to
Yellowstone but this book made me want to go. maybe my family will
visit Yellowstone someday!
Proofreading
Our National Parks • Grade 4/ Unit 1
16
At Home: Write or copy a brief passage making mistakes in
punctuation and capitalization. Have your child proofread it.
Name
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
A. Combine each pair of simple sentences with and, but, or or.
1. The volcano erupts. Molten rock  ows out.
2. Yellowstone is a great place. I like other parks too.
3. We’ll go camping together. We might go to the beach.
4. Kyle forgot to pack a tootbrush. Susan forgot to bring soap.
5. Mom likes to hike. Dad likes to  sh.
B. Combine each pair of sentences by joining their subjects or
predicates with and.
6. Ava cooked hot dogs. Trey cooked hot dogs.
7. Koala bears live in Australia. Kangaroos live in Australia.
8. Fish swim in the lake. Fish  nd food in the lake.
9. Dad packed the knapsack. He put it over his shoulder.
10. Sarah gathered wood for the  re. James gathered wood for the  re.
Test: Combining
Sentences
Our National Parks • Grade 4/ Unit 1
17
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
A compound sentence contains two sentences joined by
and, but, or or.
A compound subject contains two or more simple subjects
that have the same predicate.
A compound predicate contains two or more simple
predicates that have the same subject.
Write a short passage about the picture.
Use two compound sentences and several
simple sentences in your passage.
Review: Combining
Sentences
Our National Parks • Grade 4/ Unit 1
18
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Combine each pair of sentences using the given conjunction.
1. The night became very dark. A cloud hid the moon. (when)
2. Gracie reads books about the moon. She comes home. (as soon as)
3. People weigh less on the moon. Gravity is weaker there. (because)
4. I’ve studied stars and planets. I was eight years old. (since)
5. I always put on my spacesuit. I leave the ship. (before)
6. You can’t breathe on the moon. You bring an oxygen tank. (unless)
7. Earth looks like a big blue marble. You see it from outer space. (if)
8. Astronauts visited the moon. The moon is over 250,000 miles away.
(although)
A conjunction joins words, groups of words, or sentences.
And, but, or or combine sentences.
Some conjunctions tell where, when, why, how, or under
what condition.
where when why how although
as before because as if if
as soon as after since as though unless
Complex Sentences
The Astronaut and the Onion
Grade 4/ Unit 1
19
At Home: With your child, read the sentences above. Ask
your child if the conjuctions could be used in a different place
in the sentence.
Name
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
A sentence that contains two related ideas joined by a
conjunction other than and, but, or or is called a complex
sentence.
To form a complex sentence, combine these ideas using the
given conjunction. Be sure that the new sentence makes sense.
1. The astronaut eats his meal. He  oats around in the rocket. (as)
2. Light leaves a star. It takes thousands of years to reach Earth. (after)
3. Eat some freeze-dried snacks. You work at the computer. (while)
4. He goes to the library. He reads books about space. (where)
5. Mom doesn’t want me to come along. It is dangerous. (since)
6. Fasten your seatbelts. The ship takes off. (before)
7. He brought a chunk of moon rock. He came home for the holidays. (when)
8. They watched. The rocket blasted off into space. (as)
Complex Sentences
The Astronaut and the Onion
Grade 4/ Unit 1
20
At Home: Work with your child to write complex sentences
using each of these conjunctions: where, before, and because.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
A complex sentence features an independent clause and one
or more dependent clauses.
It does not always need a comma.
Rewrite this paragraph using complex sentences.
I was a little girl I have wanted to be an astronaut. I would read books
about space. I felt like getting right into a rocket ship. I want to see
the Red Planet, Mars, most of all. It represents action and energy.
Red is my favorite color. I want to try to make my dream come true I
grow up. I plan to go to college and I can major in astronomy. I can
train in a space program.
Mechanics
The Astronaut and the Onion
Grade 4/ Unit 1
21
At Home: Help your child add more complex sentences to
this paragraph. Watch for run-ons.
Name
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Rewrite the letter below. Fix any spelling, punctuation, and grammar
mistakes.
678 Saturn Road
Baltimore, MD 21204
July 11, 2007
Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes
39 Sunshine Drive
Baltimore, MD 21286
Dear Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes,
I would like to be an astronaut. Because it would be exciting. You were the first
people to travel to Mars. I bet you know a lot about space travel. I would like to
learn more about outer space? I want to travel to mars someday. I also plan to
visit Jupiter and Venus. Do you know which schools I could go to!
Sincerely,
Diana Smith
Remember that some conjuctions tell where, when, why,
how, or under what condition.
Proofreading
The Astronaut and the Onion
Grade 4/ Unit 1
22
At Home: Write a short, silly paragraph with mistakes in
complex sentences. Ask your child to point out the errors.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Choose the best conjunction to combine each pair of sentences.
1. It was the year 1969 __________ the  rst person walked on the moon.
a until
b as if
c when
d since
2. A month will pass __________ we see a full moon again.
e before
f unless
g as
h as soon as
3. You need to wear a space suit __________ the temperatures are
extreme.
a although
b because
c after
d why
4. He jumped high off the ground _________ his body were weightless.
e how
f before
g as if
h until
5. I would not move to the moon __________ it is a beautiful place.
a if
b after
c as though
d although
Test: Complex
Sentences
The Astronaut and the Onion
Grade 4/ Unit 1
23
Name
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
A sentence that contains two related ideas joined by a
conjunction other than and, but, or or is called a complex
sentence.
where when why how although
as before because as if if
as soon as after since as though unless
Combine each pair of sentences to form a complex sentence. Choose
conjunctions from the box above to connect them. Be sure that the
new sentence makes sense.
1. I want to be an astronaut. Astronauts explore outer space.
2. Sunlight travels 93 million miles. It reaches Earth.
3. Pluto was discovered. Scientists discovered the other planets.
4. Bring a spacesuit. You visit the moon.
5. We can’t live on Pluto. It is too cold.
Review: Complex
Sentences
The Astronaut and the Onion
Grade 4/ Unit 1
24
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Correct the run-on sentences by separating them into two sentences.
Each sentence should have a subject and a verb.
1. I’m bored at Grandma’s house she doesn’t have a TV.
2. We’re going bird watching you can bring your friend along.
3. The raft  oated by he wondered where it came from.
4. The animals are fascinating I will try drawing them.
5. I played with the otters they let me feed them.
6. Grandma found a pearl inside the clam she kept it for years.
7. He draws a picture on the raft he draws well.
8. Grandma loves the river she uses the raft to  oat on it.
A run-on sentence joins together two or more
sentences that should be written separately.
The boy found the raft the raft floated down the river.
You can correct a run-on sentence by separating two
complete ideas into two sentences. Each sentence
should have a subject and a verb.
The boy found the raft. The raft floated down the river.
Run-on Sentences
The Raft • Grade 4/ Unit 1
25
At Home: Take turns writing run-on sentences and
correcting them.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
You can correct a run-on sentence by rewriting it as a
compound or a complex sentence.
Correct these run-on sentences by rewriting them as compound or
complex sentences. Be sure that the new sentence makes sense.
1. I thought the visit would be boring I had a fun time.
2. I woke up the birds started chirping.
3. She looked at the drawings wondered who drew them.
4. He’s never been on a boat he’s afraid he’ll get seasick.
5. Grandma is an artist is carving a bear.
6. You can go on the raft you must wear a life jacket.
7. The fawn was trapped I set her free.
8. We have to be careful the water is deep.
Run-on Sentences
The Raft • Grade 4/ Unit 1
26
At Home: With your child, write a few run-on sentences.
Practice rewriting them as compound or complex sentences.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
You can correct a run-on sentence by separating two
complete ideas into two sentences. Make sure each
sentence starts with a capital letter and ends with a period.
You can correct a run-on sentence by rewriting it as a
compound or complex sentence. Be sure to use a comma
before and, but, or or.
Correct the following run-on
sentences. Separate the
parts into two sentences,
or join the parts into one
compound or complex
sentence.
1. The workroom is messy there are books, sketches, and  shing poles
everywhere.
2. We want to camp out it is too cold outdoors.
3. It is dif cult to photograph the buck it gets frightened and runs away.
4. Hal likes his raft Hal  shes off it.
5. I travel on the raft I push it along with a pole.
6. The deer came right up to me it was not scared at all.
Mechanics
The Raft • Grade 4/ Unit 1
27
At Home: With your child, read the fragments above and
nd other ways to correct them.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Rewrite the journal entry below, correcting any punctuation and
grammar mistakes. Be sure to fix any run-on sentences.
April 10 2005
Mom, Dad, Dave, and I went rafting on Foamy river today we had so
much fun! We were worried about the water being cold it is only April.
We brought extra sweaters. Of course, we also brought our lifejackets?
Dave and I wanted to steer the raft we were too little. The current was
very strong. The raft went up and down we got splashed a few times. We
passed the woods my brother saw a deer. At the end of the day we were
tired we want to go again soon.
A run-on sentence joins together two or more sentences.
You can correct a run-on sentence by separating two
complete ideas into two sentences.
You can correct a run-on sentence by rewriting it as a
compound or complex sentence.
Proofreading
The Raft • Grade 4/ Unit 1
28
At Home: With your child, take turns writing passages with
grammar and punctuation mistakes. Exchange passages and
correct them.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
A. Correct these run-on sentences by separating them into two
sentences.
1. Have you ever been on a raft it’s lots of fun.
2. My grandfather is a painter he paints animals.
3. I woke up a huge buck was standing there.
4. Beavers are so funny-looking have you ever seen one?
5. I drew the fawn I showed it to Grandma.
B. Rewrite the following run-on sentences as compound or complex
sentences. Be sure that the new sentences make sense.
6. You should bring your life jacket the water is deep.
7. He had to walk quietly the deer would run away.
8. I invited Bob to visit he likes the outdoors.
9. Kerry watched sadly the otters swam away.
10. I was sad to leave the river I was glad to be going home.
Test: Run-on
Sentences
The Raft • Grade 4/ Unit 1
29
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
A run-on sentence joins together two or more sentences
that should be written separately.
You can correct a run-on sentence by separating two
complete ideas into two sentences.
You can correct a run-on sentence by rewriting it as a
compound or complex sentence.
1. we love the lake so many animals live there
2. it’s hard to catch rabbits they run away so fast
3. deer get frightened they see or hear you
4. the raccoon’s eyes are black he’s wearing a mask
5. most birds can  y some cannot
Add capital letters, conjunctions, and punctuation marks to turn each
group of words into one or two sentences that tell about the picture.
Review: Run-on
Sentences
The Raft • Grade 4/ Unit 1
30
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Unit Review
Read each passage and look at the underlined parts. What kind
of sentences are they? Circle your answers.
Ramon felt so frustrated. (1) Who could have stolen his lunch? “I need to
tell you something,” he said to Jack. (2) “Don’t go anywhere.
1. A. Statement
B. Question
C. Command
D. Exclamation
Some desert animals come out only at nighttime. (3) It is cooler then. The
kangaroo rat is nocturnal. (4) Have you ever seen one?
3. A. Statement
B. Question
C. Command
D. Exclamation
(5) What fun it is to go to the park! I’ve been to Yellowstone National
Park three times. Carol has never been there. (6) Ask her to come along.
5. A. Statement
B. Question
C. Command
D. Exclamation
2. E. Statement
F. Question
G. Command
H. Exclamation
4. E. Statement
F. Question
G. Command
H. Exclamation
6. E. Statement
F. Question
G. Command
H. Exclamation
Unit Review • Grade 4/ Unit 1
31
Grammar
Name
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Unit Review
Read each passage and look at the underlined sentences.
Is there a mistake? If there is, how do you correct it? Circle your
answers.
We all feel so much lighter on the moon. (7) The force of gravity. I can
jump two feet into the air. (8) It’s easy. You should try it!
7. A. Add a subject.
B. Add a predicate.
C. Join two sentences with and.
D. No mistake.
I took the raft out on the lake. (9) Came with me. (10) It was cold we
didn’t stay long.
9. A. Add a subject.
B. Add a predicate.
C. Join two sentences with and.
D. No mistake.
(11) I love to sketch animals. (12) My grandfather an experienced painter.
I visit him and sketch the animals on his farm.
11. A. Add a subject.
B. Add a predicate.
C. Join two sentences with and.
D. No mistake.
8. E. Add a subject.
F. Add a predicate.
G. Join two sentences with and.
H. No mistake.
10. E. Add a subject.
F. Add a predicate.
G. Join two sentences with and.
H. No mistake.
12. E. Add a subject.
F. Add a predicate.
G. Join two sentences with and.
H. No mistake.
32
Unit Review • Grade 4/ Unit 1
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Common Nouns
• A noun names a person, place, or thing.
A common noun names any person, place, or thing.
Examples: teacher city dog
• A common noun does not begin with a capital letter.
A common noun does not name a particular person, place,
or thing. These words are not common nouns: Mr. Smith,
Chicago, Spot.
Underline the common nouns in each sentence.
1. Baseball is my favorite sport.
2. The pitcher is named Jackie.
3. My father says the New York Yankees are a great team.
4. Listen to the noise of the crowd sitting in the bleachers.
5. Alissa said the umpire was wrong.
6. Alex and Daniel play baseball in the backyard.
7. My sister uses a wooden bat.
8. Don’t throw the ball in the house!
9. The batter has two strikes.
10. John lost his mitt.
11. Your foot has to touch the base.
12. Let’s keep track of the game.
13. That ball is a foul.
14. Did you bring your cleats?
Mighty Jackie Grade 4/Unit 2
33
At Home: Ask your child to write two sentences about the
story and underline the common nouns.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
COMMON PROPER
A proper noun names a particular person, place, or thing.
Examples: Ms. Brown San Francisco Atlantic Ocean.
• A proper noun begins with a capital letter.
Some proper nouns contain more than one word. Each
important word begins with a capital letter.
Examples: Statue of Liberty Boston Red Sox
The name of a day, month, or holiday begins with a capital
letter.
Read the list of nouns below. Decide whether each noun is
common or proper and write it in the correct column. Capitalize
the nouns in the Proper column.
Proper Nouns
independence day summer uniform new york
hank aaron stadium ebbets field july
home plate jackie robinson coach world series
diamond game shortstop ohio
Mighty Jackie Grade 4/Unit 2
34
At Home: Have your child list two common nouns and two
proper nouns.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
Some proper nouns contain more than one word. Each
important word begins with a capital letter.
The name of a day, month, or holiday begins with a capital
letter.
Capitalize the proper nouns found in each sentence.
1. I like to play baseball with my brother matt and his friends.
2. Last saturday, we played all afternoon.
3. I am also part of the dallas little league.
4. My cousin karen is the best pitcher I know.
5. We play ball together when I visit her in  orida.
6. I haven’t seen her since thanksgiving.
7. She has a baseball card with a picture of mickey mantle.
8. My uncle went to a game at yankee stadium.
Mighty Jackie Grade 4/Unit 2
35
At Home: Ask your child to write two sentences about the
story. Then have your child underline the proper nouns.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Some proper nouns contain more than one word. Each
important word begins with a capital letter.
The name of a day, month, or holiday begins with a capital
letter.
Rewrite the invitation below. Fix any spelling, punctuation, and
grammar mistakes. Remember to capitalize each important word
in a proper noun. Use a separate page if you need more space.
westfield little league invites you to attend
our 2005 most valuable player awards ceremony
at five o’clock on sunday, january 30
westfield town hall
501 central avenue, westfield, virginia
Please contact sally and jim smith at 555-1212 if you plan to attend.
We hope you will join us!
Proofreading
Mighty Jackie Grade 4/Unit 2
36
At Home: Have your child write a line from the corrected
invitation on an index card. Discuss why it should be
capitalized.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Common and
Proper Nouns
Find the two nouns in each sentence and write them on the
lines.
1. Yogi Berra is a famous coach.
2. My uniform is in the dryer.
3. The ball landed in Lake Superior.
4. Dr. Zed talked to my mom.
5. This bat is made of aluminum.
6. I pitched the ball to the batter.
7. Stretch your legs while in your sweatpants.
8. Write down the score of the game.
Use the nouns in the box to complete each sentence in a way
that makes sense. Don’t forget to capitalize any proper nouns.
jill dog february idaho
autograph bleachers mitt
9. We drove from Nebraska to
.
10. My
plays catch with me.
11. I asked for the pitcher’s
.
12. I’ve been practicing since
.
13. Ask
to play with us.
14. We sat in the
.
15. Where is my
?
37
Mighty Jackie Grade 4/Unit 2
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Review: Common
and Proper Nouns
• A common noun names any person, place, or thing.
• A proper noun names a particular person, place, or thing.
Mechanics
Begin each important word in a proper noun with a capital
letter.
Begin the name of a day, holiday, or month with a capital
letter.
Read each sentence. Write the underlined noun correctly on the line.
1. Jackie struck out lou gehrig.
2. This historic event took place in tennessee.
3. The team played against the chattanooga lookouts.
4. Babe Ruth didn’t want to play against a girl.
5. My teacher, ms. potter, told me about the game.
Mighty Jackie Grade 4/Unit 2
38
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
A singular noun names one person, place, or thing.
Examples: teacher, city, dog.
A plural noun names more than one person, place, or thing.
Examples: teachers, cities, dogs.
• Add -s to form the plural of most singular nouns.
Decide whether each underlined word is a singular or plural
noun. Then write singular or plural on the line.
1. There are no jobs here.
2. My family is leaving the country.
3. We’re going to stay with my grandparents for now.
4. Papa sent us a letter.
5. He is meeting us at the bus station.
6. We’re waiting to get our green cards.
7. This trip is taking forever!
8. It’s been weeks since I’ve seen you.
9. The pages of my diary are  lling up.
10. I miss the park I used to go to.
11. I had to sell my bike.
12. The apartment is crowded.
13. I kept my two parrots.
14. We bought some new clothes.
15. She received several letters.
Singular and Plural
Nouns
My Diary from Here to There
Grade 4/ Unit 2
39
At Home: Have your child think of three singular nouns and
three plural nouns naming items he or she would bring on a
journey.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Forming Plural Nouns
• Add -s to form the plural of most singular nouns.
Add -es to form the plural of singular nouns that end in s, sh,
ch, or x.
To form the plural of nouns ending in a consonant and y,
change y to i and add -es.
To form the plural of nouns ending in a vowel and y, add -s.
Write the correct plural form of each noun in parentheses.
1. We saw (foxs)
running across the prairie.
2. Many people from other (countrys)
have come to
the United States.
3. (Massies)
of people traveled to the west in the 1800s.
4. Some travelers keep (diarys)
.
5. Gather a few (branchs)
so we can build a  re.
6. She caught a rabbit that was hiding in the (bushs)
.
7. I asked the neighbor’s two (boyes)
to help me milk
the cow.
8. Some people used the old trail, but a few found new (pathway)
.
9. That chest has many (scratchs)
.
10. Please feed the (babys)
.
11. We need more (boxs)
than that!
12. I will write two more (pagies)
today.
My Diary from Here to There
Grade 4/ Unit 2
40
At Home: Write down ten singular nouns. Have your child
write the plural form.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
A comma tells the reader to pause between the words that it separates.
Use commas to separate three or more words in a series.
Example: We enjoyed the mountains, the trees, and the clouds in
the park.
Do not use a comma after the last word in a series.
Rewrite the sentences below by adding commas where they belong.
1. He fed milked and groomed the cows.
2. Go to the store and get  our eggs and sugar.
3. Mexico Ireland and China are three countries I have visited.
4. Bring wood nails and a hammer.
5. We have mules horses and pigs on our ranch.
6. This city feels dirty strange and lonely.
7. Mosquitoes spiders and ants annoyed us.
8. I brought my diary my pencil and an eraser.
9. My mother father and brother are coming along.
10. I miss the house my dog and our friends.
My Diary from Here to There
Grade 4/ Unit 2
41
At Home: Write three sentences without commas. Then,
have your child rewrite them correctly using commas.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Proofreading
• Add -s to form the plural of most singular nouns.
Add -es to form the plural of singular nouns that end in s, sh,
ch, or x.
To form the plural of nouns ending in a consonant and y,
change y to i and add -es.
To form the plural of nouns ending in a vowel and y, add -s.
Rewrite the radio advertisement below. Fix any spelling,
punctuation, and grammar mistakes. Use a separate page if you
need more space.
Looking for quick  xs for bath and shower time? Dr. Minty’s Amazing
3-in-1 Gel is the answer! Use it to clean minor cuts and scratchs. It also
works to soothe any itchs rashs or irritations of the skin. Lastly, it’s a gentle
cleansing alternative to harsh soaps and body washs. It’s safe for adultes kids
and even babys. The 3-in-1 Gel is available in boxs containing eight twelve
or sixteen ounces. It’s one of our best buyes—each box lasts for monthies!
My Diary from Here to There
Grade 4/ Unit 2
42
At Home: Have your child write a line from the corrected
advertisement.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Singular
and Plural Nouns
A. Read each sentence. Find the noun that is singular. Circle
your answer.
1. Many families rode in covered wagons across the state.
a. families b. rode c. wagons d. state
2. My mother, sisters, and grandparents packed their clothes.
a. mother b. sisters c. grandparents d. clothes
3. I watched many sunsets over the beautiful lake.
a. watched b. sunsets c. beautiful d. lake
4. The hens, the old rooster, and the cows came with us.
a. hens b. rooster c. cows d. with
B. Read each sentence. Find the correct plural form for the
nouns in parentheses. Circle your answer.
5. The blue (sky) over the prairies seem so vast and clear.
a. skys b. skyes c. skies d. skyies
6. We spent many (day) on our journey.
a. days b. dayes c. daies d. dayies
7. Be sure to avoid the swamps and (marsh).
a. marshs b. marshes c. marshies d. marshys
8. I’ve lived in several (city), but I prefer the country.
a. citys b. cityes c. cities d. cityies
43
My Diary from Here to There
Grade 4/ Unit 2
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Review: Singular
and Plural Nouns
• Add -s to form the plural of most singular nouns.
Add -es to form the plural of singular nouns that end in s, sh,
ch, or x.
To form the plural of nouns ending in a consonant and y,
change y to i and add -es.
To form the plural of nouns ending in a vowel and y, add -s.
Mechanics
A comma tells the reader to pause between the words that it
separates.
Use commas to separate three or more words in a series.
Do not use a comma after the last word in a series.
Correct each sentence below by changing the underlined
singular noun to a plural, and by adding the missing commas.
With a partner, take turns reading the corrected sentences
aloud, pausing when you reach each comma.
1. We saved our penny nickels and dimes.
2. They traveled on bus trains and planes.
3. Fox dogs and squirrels were seen in the  eld.
4. Fly ants and spiders lived near the swamp.
5. I counted the day weeks and months.
My Diary from Here to There
Grade 4/ Unit 2
44
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Irregular Plural Nouns
Some nouns have special plural forms.
1. man
2. child
3. woman
4. life
5. calf
6. thief
7. potato
8. goose
9. ox
10. wife
11. foot
12. hero
13. tooth
14. gentleman
15. knife
16. tomato
17. mouse
18. louse
19. leaf
20. half
calves lice children feet geese
gentlemen leaves potatoes knives halves
mice wives thieves heroes tomatoes
lives men women oxen teeth
Look in the above box for the plural form of each singular noun.
Write it on the line provided.
Focus on China • Grade 4/Unit 2
45
At Home: Take turns with your child using the singular and
plural nouns on this page in oral sentences.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Irregular Plural Nouns
A few nouns have the same plural and singular form.
To determine whether the noun is singular or plural, look at
the rest of the sentence.
Read the sentences below. Then decide whether the underlined
noun is singular or plural. Write your answer on the line.
1. There was not one sheep on Papa’s farm.
2. A herd of buffalo trampled across the land.
3. Moose live in cold places, like Canada.
4. This species of insect only lives for two days.
5. I ate clams and shrimp at dinner.
6. Be quiet or you might scare that deer away.
7. We caught  ve  sh today.
8. We saw a moose at the zoo.
9. He dipped each shrimp into the cocktail sauce.
10. Sheep produce wool for sweaters.
11. We raked the leaves today.
12. I am not afraid of the mouse.
13. She is getting her teeth cleaned.
14. Several oxen passed the ranch.
15. He wanted a baked potato.
46
Focus on China • Grade 4/Unit 2
At Home: Have your child write three sentences using the
nouns above, stating if they are singular or plural.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
Some nouns have special plural forms.
A few nouns have the same singular and plural forms.
Read each sentence. Draw a line under the word in parentheses
that is the correct plural form.
1. Chinese (factoryes, factories) produced lots of paper.
2.
Wheelbarrows, invented in China, were compared to wooden (oxes, oxen)
.
3. Chinese inventors experimented with magnetism by placing iron ( sh,
shes) in water.
4. The  rst kites  oated through the air like (leafs, leaves).
5. I wonder who  rst realized it’s a good idea to brush your (tooths,
teeth)?
6. Magicians placed pieces of lodestone into the (bellys, bellies) of
wooden turtles.
7. A member of the Chinese court invented a machine to predict
(earthquakes, earthquaks).
8. I didn’t know the Chinese had made (compassies, compasses).
9. I think of inventors as (heroes, heros).
10. What different (specieses, species) of animals come from China?
11. These inventions have changed many people’s (lives, lifes).
12. (Tomatoes, Tomatos) come with the meal.
Focus on China • Grade 4/Unit 2
47
At Home: Have your child name the two nouns in the above
sentences that have the same plural and singular forms.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Proofreading
A few nouns have the same plural and singular form.
To determine whether the noun is singular or plural, look at
the rest of the sentence.
Rewrite the narrative below. Fix any spelling, punctuation, and
grammar mistakes. Be sure to correct the eleven incorrectly formed
plural nouns.
I want to be a chef who invents new, delicious dishs for people to enjoy!
I decided this after visiting a new restaurant a few days ago. All of the mens,
womans, and childs there watched the chef with great excitement. I watched
him handle his long, sharp knifes carefully. Effortlessly, he diced potatos
and tomatoeies into halfs and quarters. The shrimpses and  shies sizzled as
he cooked them on the hot grill. When our excellent meal arrived, we really
sank our toothes into it. That’s when I decided cooking must be a fun way to
be creative.
48
Focus on China • Grade 4/Unit 2
At Home: Have your child write a paragraph about traveling,
using two irregular plural nouns.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Irregular
Plural Nouns
A. Write yes if the noun below has the same singular and plural
forms. Write no if the noun does not have the same singular
and plural forms.
1. ship
2. deer
3. calf
4. species
5. moose
6. ox
7. half
8. shrimp
B. Complete each sentence with the plural form of the singular
noun in parentheses.
9. Two baby (calf)
were born last night.
10. Which of the inventors were (woman)
?
11. It is easier for (child)
to learn a new language than it
is for adults to learn one.
12. King Henry VIII had many (wife)
.
13. There were a few (mouse)
under the stove in the
kitchen.
14. The (thief)
were soon caught.
15. My (foot)
are so tired.
16. That dog has plenty of (louse)
.
49
Focus on China • Grade 4/Unit 2
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Review: Irregular
Plural Nouns
A few nouns have the same plural and singular form.
To determine whether the noun is singular or plural, look at
the rest of the sentence.
Mechanics
• A proper noun begins with a capital letter.
The name of a day, month, or holiday begins with a capital letter.
Capitalize family names if they refer to specific people.
Capitalize titles of people before names.
Rewrite the sentences below. Fix any punctuation and
grammar mistakes.
1. I enjoy reading storys about how the great wall of china was built.
2. I wonder how many mans and womens worked on it.
3. My friend john wants to know how many foots long it is.
4. Some people spent their whole lifes working on it.
5. I will tell my childrens the story of the Great wall.
50
Focus on China • Grade 4/Unit 2
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Possessive Nouns
A possessive noun is a noun that shows who or what owns
or has something.
A singular possessive noun is a singular noun that shows
ownership.
Form a singular possessive noun by adding an apostrophe
(’) and -s to a singular noun.
Write the possessive form of each underlined singular noun.
1. Ben Franklin almanacs are very funny to read.
2. The book is the library, so please return it.
3. People rang the church loud bells when there was a  re.
4. The inventor fame spread throughout the nation.
5. Have you seen Mary bifocals?
6. Ben Franklin was one of America best-known citizens.
7. This old book pages are torn.
8. My doctor advice is to exercise more.
9. The key was tied to the kite long string.
10. The battery power is running low.
11. The lawyer advice was quite helpful.
12. One person work is not enough today.
13. The car fender is dented.
14. I created the of ce design.
51
At Home: Have your child write four sentences using four of
the singular possessive nouns above.
How Ben Franklin Stole the
Lightning •
Grade 4/ Unit 2
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Plural Possessive
Nouns
A plural possessive noun is a plural noun that shows
ownership.
To form the possessive of a plural that ends in s, add an
apostrophe.
To form the possessive of a plural noun that does not end
in s, add an apostrophe and -s. A few nouns have the same
plural and singular form.
Write the plural possessive form of each underlined noun.
1. Those experiments purpose was to teach us more about electricity.
2. For the  rst time, the post of ce delivered mail directly to people
houses.
3. The mayor honored the  re ghters heroism.
4. Electrical charges effects can be dangerous.
5. Ben Franklin won several countries respect.
6. The church bells ringing woke me.
7. Most limes skin is green, but one kind of lime is yellow.
8. The children book was very interesting.
9. That is the workers break room.
10. The bulbs shoots will sprout  owers.
11. Twelve sinks drains must be cleaned out.
12. The insects habits inspired my work.
13. Airplanes tires are fully in ated.
14. Those objects tags are missing.
How Ben Franklin Stole the
Lightning •
Grade 4/ Unit 2
52
At Home: Have your child write sentences using the
possessive forms of these plural nouns: children, boys, girls,
people.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
Capitalize the first and last words and all important words in the
titles of books and newspapers.
Underline titles of books, newspapers, magazines, and TV series.
Put quotation marks around the titles of short stories, articles,
songs, poems, and book chapters.
Remember to use apostrophes to form possessive nouns.
Rewrite each sentence, making sure the titles are written correctly.
1. One of Ben Franklin best-known books is titled poor Richard’s almanac.
2. Lewis Latimer wrote a book called incandescent electric lighting in 1890.
3. I learned about Thomas Edison and Lewis Latimer from an article called
great american inventors of the past.
4. The article was published in the magazine science for kids.
5. My friend is writing a short story titled the amazing mind of lewis latimer.
6. He hopes to get his story published in his local newspaper, the miami herald.
How Ben Franklin Stole the
Lightning •
Grade 4/ Unit 2
53
At Home: Write four familiar titles without capital letters,
underlining, or quotation marks. Have your child rewrite the
titles correctly.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Proofreading
A singular possessive noun is a singular noun that shows ownership.
A plural possessive noun is a plural noun that shows ownership.
Rewrite the book review below. Fix any spelling, punctuation, and
grammar mistakes. Be sure to correct any mistakes in titles or
possessive nouns.
I found Akimi Gibsons book, Lewis Howard Latimer: an inventive
Mind, very interesting. Latimer, an African-American inventor, was born
in the mid-1800s. He made drawings of other inventors creations, which
were used to apply for patents. Then Latimers own ideas for inventions
began to unfold. He helped improve the lavatories on trains and assisted
with Alexander Graham Bells invention of the telephone. While working
for the U. S. Electric Lighting Company, he found a way to protect light
bulbses’  laments so they would not burn out quickly. This was a great
improvement to Thomas Edisons’ lightbulb. Gibsons biography of Latimer
is an informative one.
How Ben Franklin Stole the
Lightning •
Grade 4/ Unit 2
54
At Home: Have your child write two lines from the corrected
book review.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Singular
and Plural Possessive
Nouns
A Choose the correct singular possessive form to complete each
sentence.
1.
invention changed the world.
a. Edisons b. Edison’ c. Edison’s d. Edisons’
2. The
effect was devastating.
a.r e b. re’s c. res’ d. res
3. The
temperature is warmer in some places.
a. oceans b. oceans’ c. ocean d. ocean’s
4. The
laughter lasted a long time.
a. king’s b. kings c. kings’ d. king’
B. Choose the correct plural possessive form to complete each
sentence.
5. These
inventions were amazing!
a. people b. peoples c. peoples’ d. people’s
6. African-American
right to take out patents was
recognized after the Civil War.
a. inventors b. inventor’s c. inventors’ d. inventor’
7. The
efforts led to a new creation.
a. worker b. workers’ c. workers d. worker’s
8. The
amazement showed on their faces.
a. childs’ b. childrens’ c. children’s d. childrens
9. All of the
covers were torn.
a. books b. books’ c. book’s d. book
10. The
purposes must be made clearer.
a. experiments b. experiment’s c. experiment’ d. experiments’
How Ben Franklin Stole the
Lightning •
Grade 4/ Unit 2
55
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Review: Singular
and Plural Possessive
Nouns
A singular possessive noun is a singular noun that shows
ownership.
A plural possessive noun is a plural noun that shows
ownership.
Mechanics
Add an apostrophe and -s to a singular noun to make it
possessive.
Add an apostrophe to make most plural nouns possessive.
Add an apostrophe and -s to form the possessive of plural
nouns that do not end in s.
Read the sentences below. Make each underlined noun
possessive.
1. What do you know about electricity effects?
2. Engineers jobs are very challenging.
3. That light bulb  lament is burned out.
4. Find the book place on the shelf.
5. The eyeglasses lenses are scratched.
6. Those people help is very important.
7. The electrical charges power is strong.
8. Don’t forget those libraries rules.
9. These doctors experiments worked well.
10. The children logs are detailed.
How Ben Franklin Stole the
Lightning •
Grade 4/ Unit 2
56
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Plural and Possessive
Nouns
• A plural noun names more than one person, place, or thing.
Add -s to most nouns to form the plural. Do not use an
apostrophe.
To form the plural of most nouns that end in y, change the y
to i and add -es.
Write the plural form of the noun in the parentheses on the line
provided.
1. The two girls rode their (bike)
up the hill.
2. You’re not allowed to bring (snake)
into the library.
3. (Library)
are good places to go to  nd information.
4. Some (book)
cannot be taken out of the library.
5. I bet the (person)
who work in libraries know a lot.
6. The library has a special section with books just for (child)
.
7. I want to look up some (fact)
about snakes.
8. I am also checking out a book of short (story)
.
9. A snake’s (scale)
feel dry, not slimy.
10. I like to watch television shows about (animal)
.
11. There are many (reptile)
to read about.
12. My favorite (stop)
are nature trails.
13. I found some great wildlife (magazine)
.
14. We like the (museum)
in the city.
Dear Mr. Winston
Grade 4/ Unit 2
57
At Home: Have your child write fi ve singular nouns. Then
ask your child to write the plural form of each one.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
1. She carried the noisy
from several snakes.
2. When he saw the rattlesnake, he was scared by the
sound.
3. I want to  nd some
about animals in the library.
4. This book has words but no
.
5. This
photographs are very interesting.
6. Snakes shed their
when they grow.
7. Will you help me open those
to see what’s inside?
8. A
bite may or may not contain poison.
9. Oh no, that
lid is moving!
10. Some types of snakes live in  elds and
.
A plural noun names more than one person, place, or thing.
Add -s to most nouns to form the plural. Do not use an
apostrophe.
A possessive noun shows who or what owns or has
something.
Add an apostrophe (’) and -s to a singular noun to make it
possessive.
Write a plural noun or a possessive noun to complete each
sentence. Use the singular nouns in the box to help you.
box picture snake rattle skin prairie book
Plural and Possessive
Nouns
Dear Mr. Winston
Grade 4/ Unit 2
58
At Home: Write two sentences, one with a plural noun and
one with a possessive noun. Have your child identify which
is which.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
Begin the greeting and closing of a letter with a capital letter.
Use a comma after the greeting and closing in a letter.
Use a comma between the names of a city and state.
Use a comma between the day and the year in a date.
Use the following abbreviations for people’s titles: Mr., Mrs.,
Ms., Dr. (Doctor), Jr. (Junior), Sr. (Senior)
Use U.S. Postal service abbreviations for the state name.
Correctly rewrite the letter below.
506 Cedar Lane
albany, New York 10965
February 2 2004
Dear Doctor Mitchell,
Thank you so much for coming to speak to our class last month. We
all really enjoyed your slide show about reptiles. Our teacher, Mister
Nelson, taught a whole unit about reptiles that week.
Your friend
Bobby Hernandez
Dear Mr. Winston
Grade 4/ Unit 2
59
At Home: Have your child write a letter to a friend about
something interesting that he or she learned.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Proofreading
Correctly rewrite the letter below.
December 9, 2004
Ms Margaret Wilson
Atlanta Public library
101 Reading Road
Atlanta, Georgia 33560
Dear ms Wilson
I am writing to complain about the poor service in the childrens section
of your library. Last saturday, I wanted to check out the North American
Snake Guide by Doctor david Howard. I waited for over 30 minute’s before
anyone came to help me. No ones should have to wait that long.
Yours truly,
Kevin Andrews, Junior
A plural noun names more than one person, place, or thing.
A possessive noun shows who or what owns or has something.
Dear Mr. Winston
Grade 4/ Unit 2
60
At Home: Have your child write a complaint letter.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Plurals
and Possessives
A. Decide whether each underlined word is a plural noun or a
possessive noun. Then write plural or possessive on the line
provided.
1. This snake’s bite is not poisonous.
2. Sidewinders leave J-shaped tracks in the sand.
3. The teacher’s science lesson was very interesting.
4. Some reptiles change color to match their surroundings.
5. We went to see the museum’s display.
6. I decided to write down some notes.
7. The facts are very important.
8. That reptile’s skin is shiny.
B. Choose the plural or possessive noun that best completes
each sentence. Write it on the line provided.
9. (Sharks, Shark’s) kill fewer people than snakes do.
10. She checked out books from two (libraries, library’s).
11. The (farmers, farmer’s) crops were harmed by the insects.
12. The (colors, color’s) of the snakeskin were red, black, and gold.
13. The (magazines, magazine’s) articles were very helpful.
14. Don’t touch those (animals, animals’) skeletons!
15. Several (people, people’s) stopped by the exhibit.
Dear Mr. Winston
Grade 4/ Unit 2
61
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Review: Plural and
Possessive Nouns
Mechanics
Add -s to most nouns to form the plural. Do not use an
apostrophe.
Add an apostrophe and -s to a singular noun to make it
possessive.
Read the sentences about the picture below. Then find the plural
and possessive nouns that are not written correctly. Rewrite the
sentences on the lines below, correcting the plural or possessive
nouns.
1. What does this pages picture show you?
2. My two friend both like to read a lot.
3. I went to the schools Web site on the computer.
4. Emily is using these three article’s for her research paper.
Dear Mr. Winston
Grade 4/ Unit 2
62
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Nouns: Review
Read each passage. Choose a word or group of words that
belong in each space. Circle your answer.
pitching was amazing. She even struck out
(1)
!
(2)
1. A Jackie 2. F Mister Babe ruth
B Jackies’ G Mr. Babe Ruth
C Jackie’s H Mr Babe Ruth
D Jackies J Mr. babe Ruth
The move to New York was exciting. We spent weeks packing our
. When we got there, the first place I wanted to visit
(3)
was the
.
(4)
3. A boxes 4. F New york Public Library
B boxs G New York Public Library
C box’s H New York public library
D boxies J New York Public library
On our trip to China, there were so many sights to see! We visited
. We took a bus tour with a group of forty
(5)
.
(6)
5. A Hong kong, Beijing 6. F mans and womans
and the Great Wall G mens and womens
B Hong Kong Beijing H men and women
and the Great Wall J men’s and women’s
C Hong Kong, Beijing,
and the great Wall
D Hong Kong, Beijing,
and the Great Wall
Review Test • Grade 4/ Unit 2
63
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Many
have improved our world. Some people invent
(7)
ways to improve other people’s inventions. For example, Lewis Latimer
found a way to improve
.
(8)
7. A inventor’s creations 8. F Edisons electric lights
B inventor creations G Edison electric light’s
C inventors’ creations H Edison’s electric lights’
D inventors creation’s J Edison’s electric lights
snakes include the ribbon snake and the indigo.
(9)
The ribbon
make it look like a brightly colored
(10)
ribbon.
9. A North America’s 10. F snakes stripe’s
B north America’s G snake’s stripes
C North Americas’ H snake’s stripes’
D North Americas J snakes’ stripes
Nouns: Review
Review Test • Grade 4/ Unit 2
64
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Action Verbs
• An action verb tells what the subject does or did.
• A verb in the present-tense tells what happens now.
The present-tense must have subject-verb agreement. Add
-s to most verbs if the subject is singular. Do not add -s if the
subject is plural or I or you.
Write the correct present-tense form of each underlined verb on
the lines provided.
1. The roadrunner race across the empty desert.
2. He pause near the ribbon of highway.
3. A car speed down the road.
4. The passengers looks out the window.
5. They stares at the roadrunner.
6. The roadrunner take off again.
7. A lizard jump into a hole to escape the roadrunner.
8. The wind blow the roadrunner’s feathers.
9. Two hares hops out of the roadrunner’s way.
10. The roadrunner shake its long tail.
Roadrunner’s Dance
Grade 4/ Unit 3
65
At Home: Have your child write three sentences about
roadrunners. Have him or her circle the verbs in their
sentences.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Action Verbs
• Add -es to verbs that end in s, ch, sh, x, or z if the subject is
singular.
• Change y to i and add -es to verbs that end with a consonant
and y.
• Do not add -s or -es to a present-tense verb when the
subject is plural or I or you.
Read each sentence. Write the correct present-tense form of
each underlined verb on the lines provided.
1. The rattlesnake stretch out along the rocks.
2. His scales  ashes silver in the hot desert sun.
3. He swish his long tail.
4. A prairie dog scurry away when it hears the snake’s rattle.
5. A small lizard crawl away.
6. The rattlesnake reach the edge of the rock.
7. A bee buzz past the snake.
8. The rattlesnake hurry down the rock.
9. He quickly pass by a cold, shaded area.
10. You approaches any snake with caution.
Roadrunner’s Dance
Grade 4/ Unit 3
66
At Home: Have your child choose three verbs from this
page. Have him or her write a sentence for each verb.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
Use quotation marks at the beginning and end of a speaker’s
exact words.
Begin a quotation with a capital letter.
Do not use quotation marks when you do not use the
speaker’s exact words.
Rewrite each sentence correctly by putting capital letters and
quotation marks where they belong.
1. Roberto asked me, have you ever seen a rattlesnake?
2. no, I never have, I answered.
3. roberto told me that rattlesnakes are his favorite animal.
4. Our science teacher said, rattlesnakes are related to lizards.
5. both rattlesnakes and lizards are reptiles, she explained.
6. some reptiles can even change colors! Andrea said.
7. yes, you are thinking of chameleons, Andrea, replied Ms. Giordello.
8. why do they do that? asked Hakim.
Roadrunner’s Dance
Grade 4/ Unit 3
67
At Home: Have your child write three sentences of
dialogue. Ask him or her to use quotations in each
sentence.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Proofreading
The present tense must have subject-verb agreement.
• Add -s to most verbs if the subject is singular.
• Add -es to verbs that end in s, ch, sh, x, or z if the subject is
singular.
• Change y to i and add -es to verbs that end in a consonant
and -y.
Proofread the dialogue below. Look for mistakes in action verbs
and quotations. Rewrite the dialogue, using action verbs and
quotations correctly.
I am so excited! Today I leaves on a trip to Taos, New Mexico! Carla say.
Dad reply, we should be there in an hour.
Mom point to the mountains in the distance. She say, stop the car so we can
takes some pictures.
Carla remark, I see a strange bird.
Dad explain, the bird is a roadrunner.
Carla watch the speedy bird. It pass close enough to see its feathers.
Roadrunner’s Dance
Grade 4/ Unit 3
68
At Home: Ask your child to add two lines of dialogue to the
story above.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Action Verbs
A. Read each sentence. Circle the letter of the sentence that has
correct subject-verb agreement.
1. a. The roadrunner comes down from the mountain.
b. He look at the desert.
c. The roadrunner speed across the road.
d. The other animals rushes out of his way.
2. a. The rattlesnake slide down the rocks.
b. He see the roadrunner.
c. The rattlesnake shake his tail.
d. The rattles make a hollow clatter.
B. Read each sentence. Circle the letter before the present-
tense verb that belongs in the sentence. Make sure the
spelling is correct.
3. The roadrunner
across the highway.
a. run
b. runs
c. runes
d. runies
4. The rattlesnake
the desert for other animals.
a. watch
b. watchs
c. watches
d. watchies
Roadrunner’s Dance
Grade 4/ Unit 3
69
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Review: Action Verbs
Rewrite each sentence correctly,
paying attention to the present-tense
verb and quotation rules. Then use
the information in the sentences to
draw the missing part of the picture.
1. Mr. Duncan suggest, let’s tell a story about a roadrunner.
2. the roadrunner dash across the desert, Gary say.
3. Shanita joke, it’s headed for New Mexico!
4. Alissa add, the rattlesnakes watches it from behind cactuses.
The present tense must have subject-verb agreement.
• Add -s to most verbs if the subject is singular.
• Add -es to verbs that end in s, ch, sh, x, or z if the subject is
singular.
• Change y to i and add -es to verbs that end in a consonant
and -y.
Mechanics
Use quotation marks at the beginning and end of the
speaker’s exact words.
Begin a quotation with a capital letter.
Do not use quotation marks when you do not use the
speaker’s exact words.
Roadrunner’s Dance
Grade 4/ Unit 3
70
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Past-Tense Verbs
A verb in the past tense tells about an action that has
already happened.
• Add -ed to most verbs to show past tense.
If a verb ends with e, drop the e and add -ed.
If a verb ends with a consonant and y, change y to i and add
-ed.
If a verb ends with one vowel and one consonant, double the
consonant and add -ed.
Choose a verb for each sentence. Write the verb in the past
tense.
1. We
Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birthday in January.
(celebrate, irritate)
2. People
home from school for the holiday. (visit, stay)
3. The students in our school
about Dr. King before the
holiday. (learn, earn)
4. We
a program of events about Dr. King. (repair,
prepare)
5. Today my class
a play about his childhood. (perform,
inform)
6. James
the lead in the show. (play, place)
7. He
his lines before going onstage. (prevent, practice)
8. He
his Aunt Betty to come to the play. (sag, beg)
9. Our teacher, Mrs. Clark,
us good luck before the play
started. (wish, wash)
10. We all
our best to make the show a success. (cry, try)
My Brother Martin
Grade 4/ Unit 3
71
At Home: Have your child write fi ve sentences using the
past tense of the verbs he or she didn’t choose in the above
sentences.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Future-Tense Verbs
A verb in the future tense tells about an action that is going
to happen.
To write about the future, use the special verb will.
Underline the action verb in each sentence. Rewrite the sentence
so it tells about the future.
1. The teachers assign a project about the Civil Rights movement.
2. The students work in pairs.
3. All of the classes go to the library.
4. Cordell and Janine  nd out about the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
5. Yvonne and Frank learn about educational rights.
6. The librarians show us the right books and magazines.
7. Juan and Patricia give an oral report.
8. Josie and Emmett create a poster.
My Brother Martin • Grade 4/ Unit 3
72
At Home: Ask your child to write four sentences about
something he or she wants to learn in the future.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
The present tense must have subject-verb agreement. Add
-s to most verbs if the subject is singular. Do not add -s if the
subject is plural or I or you.
• Add -es to verbs that end in s, ch, sh, x, or z if the subject
is singular. Do not add -es when the subject is plural or I
or you.
For past-tense verbs, use the same form for singular and
plural subjects.
For future-tense verbs, use the same form for singular and
plural subjects.
Pick the correct form of the verb in each sentence below.
Underline your answer.
1. Ms. Harkner’s class (take, takes) a  eld trip today.
2. The students (will visit, will visits) the Martin Luther King, Jr. Historic Site.
3. The class (hurry, hurries) to the buses at 9:00
A.M.
4. The buses (reach, reaches) Atlanta at 10:00
A.M.
5. Tour guides (show, shows) us through Martin Luther King’s birth home.
6. A guide (teach, teaches) us about Martin Luther King, Jr.’s childhood.
7. Dr. King and his family (lived, liveds) in Alabama.
8. Dr. King (delivered, delivereds) the “I Have a Dream” speech in 1963.
9. My parents and I (will discuss, will discusses) the  eld trip tonight.
10. My sister’s class (will tour, will tours) the site next week.
My Brother Martin
Grade 4/ Unit 3
73
At Home: Have your child choose any three sentences
above and rewrite them using a different verb tense.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Proofreading
Rewrite the poem below. Be sure to correct any mistakes in
subject-verb agreement.
Just History?
To me, it’s a mystery —
Why do people thinks
Dr. King is just history?
He stand on the brink
of a change. He dream
of equality. He speak
with calm strength. His world seem
cold, but he seek
to warm it. Dr. King, we will remembers
you.
A verb in the past tense tells about an action that has
already happened.
A verb in the future tense tells about an action that is going
to happen.
My Brother Martin • Grade 4/ Unit 3
74
At Home: Have your child write a short poem in response to
the reading selection.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Verb Tenses
A. Rewrite each underlined verb, using the correct past-tense
form.
1. Gordon help Ms. Morrison decorate the classroom.
2. The students copy quotes from Dr. King onto big banners.
3. Gordon place a banner on the wall.
4. The corner of the banner  ap in the breeze.
5. The teacher push a pin into each corner of the banner.
B. Choose a verb from the box below to complete each
sentence. Write the correct future-tense form of the verb.
6. I
the sign to the wall.
7. The sign
people to our Martin Luther King, Jr.
celebration.
8. Anna
that the sign isn’t straight.
9. Ms. Morrison
the sign for us.
10. Our class
visitors welcome as they walk into the
room.
fix invite tape wish worry
My Brother Martin
Grade 4/ Unit 3
75
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Review: Verb Tenses
Change each underlined verb
to the correct past or future tense.
Last November, Jena work
on her project for social
studies. During that month, her class study
the life of
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Jena construct
a collage. She
went through magazines and clip
pictures and words. She
arrange
the words into quotations on a big piece of paper.
Her school present
an art show on the Civil Rights
movement next February. Jena show
her collage there.
Teachers, students, and parents attend.
.
• Add -ed to most verbs to show past tense.
If a verb ends with e, drop the e and add -ed.
If a verb ends with a consonant and y, change y to i and
add -ed.
If a verb ends with one vowel and one consonant, double the
consonant and add -ed.
To write about the future, use the special verb will.
Mechanics
For past- and future-tense verbs, use the same form for
singular and plural subjects.
My Brother Martin • Grade 4/ Unit 3
76
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
• The main verb in a sentence shows what the subject does
or is.
• A helping verb helps the main verb show an action or make
a statement.
Have, has, had, is, are, am, was, were, and will are helping
verbs.
Is, are, am, was, and were can be used with a main verb
ending in -ing. A verb in the past tense tells about an action
that has already happened.
Will is a helping verb used to show an action in the future.
Draw one line under each helping verb. Draw two lines under
each main verb.
1. Gidget always has liked to help others.
2. Next year, she will volunteer at the homeless shelter.
3. The shelter workers have decided that for now, she is too young.
4. Gidget has considered other ways to help.
5. She is starting her own group.
6. Gidget and her group are collecting things for homeless kids.
7. As of last week, they had gathered jackets, school supplies, and backpacks.
8. I am thinking of joining the group.
9. Yesterday we were talking about the group.
10. When I tell my friends, I am sure they will help too.
Main and Helping
Verbs
Kid Reporters at Work
Grade 4/ Unit 3
77
At Home: Have your child write three sentences using
helping verbs about ways he or she helps others.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Main and Helping
Verbs
• The main verb in a sentence shows what the subject does
or is.
• A helping verb helps the main verb show an action or make
a statement.
Have, has, and had can be helping verbs.
Is, are, am, was, were, and will can be helping verbs.
Write a main verb or helping verb to complete each sentence.
1. Charlie
searched for a place to volunteer.
2. He has
lists of groups.
3. Charlie
worrying about choosing the right place to
help.
4. He
visit different groups.
5. The people in the soup kitchen are
vegetables.
6. Many people
donated clothes to this group.
7. This afternoon Charlie is
for people who couldn’t
leave their homes.
8. He has
oors at the animal shelter.
9. Charlie
pitch in wherever he can.
10. The leaders of the groups are
him and telling him
he’s done a great job.
Kid Reporters at Work
Grade 4/ Unit 3
78
At Home: Have your child read paragraphs in a favorite
book. Ask your child to write down  ve combinations of main
and helping verbs.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• A contraction is a shortened form of two words.
A contraction can be made by combining certain verbs with
the word not.
An apostrophe (’) shows that the letter o has been left out.
Examples of contractions: is + not = isn’t, did + not = didn’t
Read each sentence. Write the contraction for each set of
underlined words.
1. Annie has not  nished sorting the bags of donated clothes.
2. Chris is not making cookies for himself, but will sell them at the bake
sale.
3. Gina does not use these toys anymore, so she will donate them.
4. Stacy and Steven will help too, because they are not sel sh.
5. Sam could not make it to the bake sale, but he raked leaves at the
park.
6. We should not bring toys to the hospital after 8 P.M.
7. Carlos enjoyed his work at the soup kitchen so much that he did not
want to leave.
8. Amy and Alex do not work at the animal shelter on Thursdays.
9. Karen and Stanley have not decided yet where to volunteer.
10. The volunteers were not needed at the nursing home today.
Kid Reporters at Work
Grade 4/ Unit 3
79
At Home: Write down the contractions from this page. Ask
your child to give the longer forms.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Proofreading
The main verb in a sentence shows what the subject does or is.
• A helping verb helps the main verb show an action or make a
statement. Add -ed to most verbs to show past tense.
Have, has, and had can be helping verbs.
Is, are, am, was, were, and will can be helping verbs.
Rewrite the paragraphs below. Be sure to correct any main
verbs, helping verbs, or contractions that are used incorrectly.
Everyone should volunteering to help others. It does’nt matter what you
do. Any way you can help will makes a difference. You don’ot have to give
up all of your free time. You can help even by volunteering just a few hours a
week. Many local organizations are count on volunteers.
One way you can help is by working at a soup kitchen. Starting on
Wednesday, I will work at the soup kitchen on Fifth Street. I’m look forward
to it.
If you take time to help others, you will knowed that you has made your
community a better place.
Kid Reporters at Work
Grade 4/ Unit 3
80
At Home: Have your child add three sentences to the
paragraphs above about a way in which he or she could
volunteer.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Main and
Helping Verbs
A. Read each sentence. Draw one line under the helping verb
and two lines under the main verb.
1. The class has planned a pancake breakfast for a fundraiser.
2. They are hoping to raise money to help children in homeless shelters.
3. The students have invited everyone they know.
4. Casey and Jerome are mixing milk, eggs, and butter.
5. Scott is pouring batter on the griddle.
B. Choose the correct helping verb to complete each sentence.
Write it on the line.
6. Anya
ipping pancakes like an expert.
a. am
b. are
c. was
7. Gordy and Fred
pitching in by showing people to
their seats.
a. was
b. are
c. is
8. The class probably
succeeded in raising money.
a. will
b. have
c. has
Kid Reporters at Work
Grade 4/ Unit 3
81
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Review: Main and
Helping Verbs
The main verb in a sentence shows what the subject does or is.
• A helping verb helps the main verb show an action or make
a statement. Add -ed to most verbs to show past tense.
Mechanics
• A contraction is a shortened form of two words.
A contraction can be made by combining certain verbs with
the word not.
An apostrophe (’) shows that the letter o has been left out.
Examples of contractions: is + not = isn’t, did + not = didn’t
Look at the picture. Circle the mistakes in main verbs and
helping verbs. Change the underlined words to contractions.
Mr. Ramsey’s class has reading about the work Gidget Schultz did for
homeless children. The students also wants to help people.
The students is visiting stores in town and explain their idea. The
stores has invited them to pick out what they want. The class is shopped
for notebooks, crayons, backpacks, and other supplies. The store owners
are not
charging the students for these items. Later,
the whole class will drops them off at the homeless shelter. Children who
did not
have school supplies will having them.
Kid Reporters at Work
Grade 4/ Unit 3
82
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
A linking verb does not show action. It connects the subject
to the rest of the sentence.
Is, are, am, was, and were are often used as linking verbs.
Read each sentence. Study the linking verbs in parentheses.
Write the form of the linking verb that correctly completes each
sentence.
1. The story we read (was, were)
Mystic Horse.
2. It (is, are)
about the Native American Pawnee tribe.
3. My classmates (was, were)
excited to learn more about
this tribe.
4. Our school  eld trips (is, are)
next month.
5. The Natural History Museum (is, are)
the place we will
visit.
6. The museum’s exhibit on the Plains Native Americans (is, are)
wonderful.
7. The Pawnee, Omaha, and Oto tribes (was, were)
Plains
tribes.
8. I (am, are)
Native American on my mother’s side of the
family.
9. Reading the tribes’ own words and stories (is, are)
the
best way to learn their history.
10. The stories (is, are)
fascinating to me.
Linking Verbs
Mystic Horse • Grade 4/ Unit 3
83
At Home: Ask your child to write a paragraph about
the story. Have your child use linking verbs in his or her
paragraphs.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Linking Verbs
A linking verb does not show action. It connects the subject
to the rest of the sentence.
Is, are, am, was, and were are often used as linking verbs.
Some linking verbs link the subject to a noun in the predicate.
Some linking verbs link the subject to an adjective in the
predicate.
Complete each sentence by writing the correct linking verb on
the line. Then underline the complete subject of the sentence.
1. Our social studies project
an interesting assignment.
2. I
eager to get started on it.
3. The Pawnee tribe
the subject of my project.
4. Mystic Horse
my favorite book last year.
5. The Pawnee Indians
unfamiliar to me before I read that
book.
6. They
a group I want to learn more about now.
7. The state of Nebraska
the place the Pawnee lived long
ago.
8. Many books about the Pawnee
in the school library.
9. The library
so big that I can’t always  nd what I need.
10. Our librarian, Ms. Kribble,
helpful to students.
Mystic Horse • Grade 4/ Unit 3
84
At Home: Write is, are, am, was, and were on index cards.
Have your child pick a card and use each verb in a sentence
orally.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
In a play, use a colon (:) between each character’s name
and his or her words.
Do not use quotation marks around dialogue in a play.
Start a new line each time a new character is speaking.
• Use parentheses ( ) around stage directions. These are
directions that tell what characters do on stage or how they
say their words out loud.
Example: GEORGE (loudly): It’s right here, Mr. Taylor!
(George holds up the book.)
Rewrite each line of dialogue below. Add colons and
parentheses where they are needed.
1. MR. BRYANT cheerfully. “Class, we are going to act out a story in our
reading book.” MR. BRYANT smiles.
2. OLIVIA calling out. “Which story will we do, Mr. Bryant?” OLIVIA waves
her hand wildly in the air.
3. MR. BRYANT. “Which story do you think will make a good play?” MR.
BRYANT shrugs his shoulders.
4. CARLOS slowly. “How about Mystic Horse, Mr. Bryant? The whole class
loved that book.”
Mystic Horse • Grade 4/ Unit 3
85
At Home: Have your child add a line of dialogue to the
scene above. Tell your child to include a stage direction.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Proofreading
A linking verb does not show action. It connects the subject
to the rest of the sentence.
Is, are, am, was, and were are often used as linking verbs.
Some linking verbs link the subject to a noun in the predicate.
Some linking verbs link the subject to an adjective in the
predicate.
Rewrite the lines of this play. Correct any linking verbs that are
used incorrectly. Be sure to use proper punctuation for a play.
T.J. “I need an idea for my social studies project. I can’t think of anything.
T.J. paces the room nervously.
CARA confidently. “My project are about Pawnee folktales.
T.J. “That’s a good idea, Cara.CARA opens the book and points to a
picture.
CARA. “The Plains tribes is very interesting to read about.
T.J. excitedly. “This were a great idea.
Mystic Horse • Grade 4/ Unit 3
86
At Home: Have your child  nd samples of dialogue in
books. Take turns reading the dialogue aloud.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Linking Verbs
A. Find the linking verb in each sentence. Write it on the line.
1. The college my sister Sharon goes to is in Nebraska.
2. Sharon and her friends were hard workers in high school.
3. Even when she was little, she was interested in the Pawnee tribe.
4. Pawnee folktales are part of what she studies in college.
B. Find the noun or adjective in the predicate that is linked to
the subject by a linking verb. Write the noun or adjective on
the line.
5. Pedro’s favorite book is Mystic Horse.
6. The lives of the Plains Indians were different from ours.
7. Dr. Gonzalez and Dr. Lasser are experts on the Pawnee tribe.
8. Pedro’s report on the Plains Indians was very detailed.
Mystic Horse • Grade 4/ Unit 3
87
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Review: Linking Verbs
A linking verb does not show action. It connects the subject
to the rest of the sentence.
Some linking verbs link the subject to a noun in the predicate.
Some linking verbs link the subject to an adjective in the
predicate.
Read the following lines from a play. Rewrite the lines, correcting any
mistakes in linking verbs. Be sure to punctuate the lines correctly.
MOM. “On Saturday, we leave for a road trip.
FRAN. “I is curious about where we are going.
MOM. “We’re going to Nebraska. The museum there are a great place to
find information about the Pawnee. My next book am about the Pawnee.
FRAN. “My class studied the Pawnee tribe last year!”
Mystic Horse • Grade 4/ Unit 3
88
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Write the correct past-tense form of the underlined verb on the
line provided.
1. The snow begin
to fall.
2. The sunlight make
the snow and ice glitter.
3. An icicle break
off the roof.
4. I  nd
the icicle on the ground.
5. The  rst snow come
earlier than usual this year.
6. We go
to the pond to ice-skate.
7. Elijah and I do
leaps, twists, and turns on the ice.
8. He  y
through the air and landed safely on the
blades of his skates.
9. Nina draw
a picture of the frozen pond.
10. We decided to go home when we see
it was getting
dark.
An irregular verb is a verb that does not add -ed to form the
past tense.
Irregular Verbs
Snowfl ake Bentley
Grade 4/ Unit 3
89
At Home: Have your child write three sentences about
winter, using the past-tense form of an irregular verb.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Some irregular verbs have special spellings when used with
the helping verbs have, has, or had.
Read each sentence and the verb choices in parentheses.
Underline the verb choice that correctly completes the sentence.
1. Alice has (did, done) many drawings and photographs of the park in
winter.
2. She had (make, made) it a hobby by the time she was ten years old.
3. For the past four years, her parents have (given, gave) her a photo
album each year for her birthday.
4. Alice has carefully (put, putted) all of her winter pictures in the albums.
5. Today, the surface of the pond has (frozen, froze).
6. Alice took pictures of the tree because she had (saw, seen) icicles on it.
7. She has (lay, laid) her camera aside while she gets more  lm out of her
bag.
8. By the end of the afternoon, the icicles have (shrunk, shrank) in the
sun.
9. Before she went home, Alice had (taken, took) more than 40 pictures.
10. The next morning, she saw that more snow had (fell, fallen).
Irregular Verbs
Snowfl ake Bentley
Grade 4/ Unit 3
90
At Home: Ask your child to rewrite the above sentences
using past-tense verbs without using have, has, or had.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• An irregular verb is a verb that does not add -ed to form the
past tense.
Some irregular verbs have special spellings when used with
the helping verbs have, has, or had.
Rewrite each sentence with the correct form of the underlined
verb. For each sentence, use the form that makes better sense—
the past-tense form or the past with the helping verb have, has,
or had.
1. We go outside an hour ago.
2. It has grow colder since we have been outside.
3. I know it was a good idea to wear my gloves, hat, and scarf.
4. The snow and ice have hide the roots of the trees.
5. The path lead us straight to the forest.
6. I keep my hands in my pockets.
7. We had choose the  rst day of winter to take pictures of the forest.
8. The winds have blow drifts of snow against the bare trees.
Snowfl ake Bentley
Grade 4/ Unit 3
91
At Home: Make a chart with two columns labeled Past
Tense and Past with Have, Has, or Had. Have your child fi ll
in the columns.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Rewrite the character sketch below. Be sure to correct any
mistakes in the use of irregular verbs.
Margaret
Margaret getted up early this morning. She bringed her camera to the pond.
She taked a picture of a  sh before it swimmed away. She photographed geese
as they  y south for the winter. Soon she had took dozens of pictures.
Ever since she was a little girl, Margaret had know she wanted to be a
photographer. By the age of 15, she had winned three photography awards.
Now 30 years old, she has write a guide for beginning photographers. She
has maked photography her life’s work.
An irregular verb is a verb that does not add -ed to form the
past tense.
Some irregular verbs have special spellings when used with
the helping verbs have, has, or had.
Proofreading
Snowfl ake Bentley
Grade 4/ Unit 3
92
At Home: Have your child add a sentence to the description
of Margaret. Ask your child to include irregular past-tense
verbs.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Irregular Verbs
A. Circle the letter before the irregular verb that correctly
completes each sentence.
1. Kevin
his camera and picked it up.
a.n d
b. nded
c. found
d. founded
2. Laurie has
some sketches of the snow-covered trees.
a. draw
b. drew
c. draw
d. drawn
B. Circle the letter before the correct irregular verb and helping
verb that completes each sentence.
3. The weather
colder and windier since this morning.
a. has become
b. have become
c. has became
d. have became
4. Before she retired, the professor
a career out of
studying snow akes.
a. has maded
b. has make
c. had make
d. had made
Snowfl ake Bentley
Grade 4/ Unit 3
93
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
An irregular verb is a verb that does not add -ed to form the
past tense.
Some irregular verbs have special spellings when used with
the helping verbs have, has, or had.
Read the sentences about the picture below. Change the verbs
that are not written correctly. Rewrite the sentences on the lines
below.
1. All day long, the snow had falled.
2. After school, we runned outside to play in the snow.
3. Carter has catched a snow ake on his tongue.
4. Lisa throwed a snowball into the pond.
5. Jordan and Chris have builded a snowman.
Review: Irregular Verbs
Snowfl ake Bentley
Grade 4/ Unit 3
94
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Unit Review: Verbs
and Their Tenses
Read the passage and look at the underlined parts. Is there a
better way to write and say each part? If there is, which is the
better way? Circle your answer.
(1) The rattlesnakes shakes their tails. The tails make a noise. (2) The
children hushes as the teacher says, Listen! The class will learn more about
rattlesnakes at the museum.
1. A. The rattlesnakes shake their
tails.
B. The rattlesnakes shakies their
tails.
C. The rattlesnakes shakeses
their tails.
D. No mistake
2. F. The children hushs as the
teacher says, “Listen!”
G. The children hush as the
teacher says, Listen!
H. The children hush as the
teacher says, “Listen!”
J. No mistake
(3) The students studyd Martin Luther King, Jr. in social studies class. They
admired his efforts in the Civil Rights movement. (4) They will learns more
about him next week.
3. A. The students studyed Martin
Luther King, Jr., in social
studies class.
B. The students studyied Martin
Luther King, Jr., in social
studies class.
C. The students studied Martin
Luther King, Jr., in social
studies class.
D. No mistake
4. F. They learn more about him
next week.
G. They will learn more about
him next week.
H. They will learned more about
him next week.
J. No mistake
Review Test
Grade 4/ Unit 3
95
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Do you do any volunteer work? (5) My brother and I is volunteer at a local
hospital. Our parents have always encouraged us to help others. (6) We
havn’t yet told them about our new volunteer jobs.
5. A. My brother and I are
volunteering at a local hospital.
B. My brother and I are
volunteered at a local hospital.
C. My brother and I is
volunteering at a local hospital.
D. No mistake
6. F. We have’nt yet told them
about our new volunteer jobs.
G. We havent’ yet told them
about our new volunteer jobs.
H. We haven’t yet told them
about our new volunteer jobs.
J. No mistake
(7) My sister is the author of a play. It is about the Pawnee tribe. (8) Her
plays is usually very exciting and dramatic. I always enjoy acting in them.
7. A. My sister are the author of a
play.
B. My sister be the author of a
play.
C. My sister am the author of a
play.
D. No mistake
8. F. Her plays are usually very
exciting and dramatic.
G. Her plays was usually very
exciting and dramatic.
H. Her plays were usually very
exciting and dramatic.
J. No mistake
Last month, we went to the mountains. (9) Snow falled all week long. We
learned to ski and snowboard. (10) When we had went the year before, there
hadn’t been as much snow.
9. A. Snow fall all week long.
B. Snow felled all week long.
C. Snow fell all week long.
D. No mistake
10. F. When we had go the year
before, there hadn’t been as
much snow.
G. When we had gone the year
before, there hadn’t been as
much snow.
H. When we gone the year
before, there hadn’t been as
much snow.
J. No mistake
Unit Review: Verbs
and Their Tenses
Review Test • Grade 4/ Unit 3
96
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Pronouns
• A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more
nouns.
A pronoun must match the noun it refers to.
Singular pronouns are I, you, he, she, it, me, him, and her.
Plural pronouns are we, you, they, us, and them.
Underline the incorrect pronoun in each sentence. Then write
the correct pronoun on the line provided.
1. There was no apple cake left because the dog ate them.
2. Mrs. Hibbins says her cats are angels, but he are not.
3. Why doesn’t he send her own dog to obedience school?
4. Ask the dogs to please be quiet because he am trying to sleep.
5. I feel sick, and I don’t know what’s wrong with I.
6. My brother and I hope that us can get a dog.
7. When Mrs. LaRue throws the ball, the dog will fetch it for she.
8. Ike said that him wanted to come home.
9. Mrs. LaRue said that her would throw a party for Ike.
10. When Mrs. LaRue and Ike were together again, them were very
happy.
11. There were enough cupcakes for all of we.
12. Sue asked me to give the ball to she.
Dear Mrs. LaRue • Grade 4/ Unit 4
97
At Home: Have your child fi nd three sentences from the
story that include pronouns.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Pronouns
• A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more
nouns.
A pronoun must match the noun it refers to.
Singular pronouns are I, you, he, she, it, me, him, and her.
Plural pronouns are we, you, they, us, and them.
Write the pronoun that correctly replaces the underlined noun in
each sentence.
1. At  rst, Roy didn’t want to go to the nursing home because Roy
thought the place was boring.
2. Mrs. Allen said Mrs. Allen found out that dogs were allowed in the
nursing home.
3. Roy knew Grandpa would be happy to see Buddy, so Roy
decided to bring Buddy.
4. The receptionist at the nursing home said to Roy, “I see Roy
brought a friend today.”
5. Mrs. Allen said, “Mrs. Allen got Buddy’s medical records this
morning.”
6. Grandpa said, “I’m glad you brought Buddy to Grandpa.”
7. Grandpa asked Martha if Buddy was allowed in the nursing
home.
8. Another man saw Buddy and said he had a dog that looked like
Buddy.
9. You can treat high blood pressure if you take medicine for the
problem.
10. Roy threw the ball to Buddy so Buddy could fetch it.
Dear Mrs. LaRue • Grade 4/ Unit 4
98
At Home: Have your child write a short paragraph about a
pet. Help your child circle the pronouns.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more
nouns.
A pronoun must match the noun it refers to.
Singular pronouns are I, you, he, she, it, me, him, and her.
The pronoun I must always be capitalized.
Plural pronouns are we, you, they, us, and them.
Write the pronoun that correctly completes each sentence.
1. I said, “
think I must take my cat to the vet.”
2. I took the leash because I would need
to hold the dog.
3. I am brushing my dog Trixie’s coat because
will be
in a show tomorrow.
4. My dog Edward needs medicine. I give it to
every
morning.
5. Janice’s brother gave
a picture of their dog Buddy.
6. Fido buried his bone in the yard, but now he can’t  nd
.
7. My sister and
threw the stick, and our dog brought it
back to us.
8. Fran’s mother told us that
had a cat when she was
little.
9. My cousins called and
told me their cat just had
kittens.
10. My little brother wanted to feed the dog, so
showed
him how to do it.
Dear Mrs. LaRue • Grade 4/ Unit 4
99
At Home: Ask family members to describe their favorite
animals. Have your child write down the pronouns they use.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Proofreading
• A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more nouns.
A pronoun must match the noun to which it refers.
Singular pronouns are I, you, he, she, it, me, him, and her.
• The pronoun I must always be capitalized.
Plural pronouns are we, you, they, us, and them.
Read the following paragraphs. Circle all the incorrect pronouns.
Then rewrite the paragraph, making sure all pronouns are
correct and match their nouns.
Yesterday i went to the store to buy some food for my dog, Jones. Mr.
Edwards greeted her when I came through the door.
She said, “What can me do for you, Sheila?”
“I need six cans of the Beef and Chicken Special Diet.
Mr. Edwards added up the prices and said, “The total is $13.50.
“Me am sorry,” I said. “My mother only gave I $10. How much is it if me
only buy four cans?”
“Let’s see. It would be $9.00,” he said.
All right. That solves my problem. She’ll only buy four.
Dear Mrs. LaRue • Grade 4/ Unit 4
100
At Home: Have your child write a story about a problem
he or she has solved. Then ask your child to identify all the
pronouns.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Pronouns and
Contractions
A. Write the pronoun that can replace the underlined word or
words in each sentence.
1. The dog led the police to the suspect.
2. My sister told my brother to walk the dog.
3. Sally and her friend tried to give the cat a bath.
4. Fido had the ball in his mouth, but he wouldn’t give the ball to me.
5. Edgar and I took his dog around the lake. He and I were both tired
afterward.
6. If the cats don’t stop scratching the couch, we’ll have to keep the cats
outside.
7. We saw our neighbors across the street.
8. I told my sister not to pet the cat.
B. Write the correct pronouns to complete these sentences.
9. I bought my cats some catnip, but
didn’t like it.
10. Last year Bruiser was only a puppy, and now
weighs 100 pounds.
11. My sister didn’t believe me when
told her how mean
the dogcatcher was.
12. The Ungers’ cat has lived with
for 16 years.
13. My friend Mary has both a dog and a cat, and
loves
them both equally.
14. Gertrude has grown up and become a vet. Her family is proud of
.
15. We brought our cat Jane to the beach, but
stayed in
the cage.
16. The dog has lived with
for many years.
Dear Mrs. LaRue • Grade 4/ Unit 4
101
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Review: Pronouns
and Contractions
Write what you think each character is saying. Use the
contraction given in your sentence.
1. Dog: (I’m)
2. Boy: (you’re)
3. Dog: (it’s)
4. Boy: (I’ll)
• A pronoun is a word that takes the place of one or more nouns.
A pronoun must match the noun it refers to.
Singular pronouns are I, you, he, she, it, me, him, and her.
Plural pronouns are we, you, they, us, and them.
• A contraction is a shortened form of two words.
A contraction may be formed by combining a pronoun and a
verb.
An apostrophe (’) shows where one or more letters have
been left out.
Mechanics
Dear Mrs. LaRue • Grade 4/ Unit 4
102
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Subject and Object
Pronouns
• Use a subject pronoun as the subject of a sentence.
I, you, he, she, it, we and they are subject pronouns.
• Use an object pronoun after an action verb or after a word
such as for, at, of, with, or to.
Me, you, him, her, it, us, and them are object pronouns.
Underline the incorrect pronouns and write the correct pronouns
on the line.
1. The villagers loved the man, and them all missed him when he
died.
2. Everyday when the man woke, him went to work in his
garden.
3. Her and me went to the well for water.
4. Us are the only ones who really know him.
5. Them are the people we met last year.
6. The young man feared the blind man would be unkind
to he.
7. Her grandmother gave she a special gift.
8. This is a secret between you and I.
9. Blind people use sounds to help they get around.
10. The bugs are a bother to she and Grandpa.
11. My father handed the hammer to I.
12. Don’t forget to call we.
The Blind Hunter • Grade 4/ Unit 4
103
At Home: Have your child write three sentences with subject
pronouns.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Reflexive Pronouns
• Use a reflexive pronoun instead of an object pronoun if
the subject of the sentence is doing the action to himself or
herself.
Myself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, ourselves,
themselves, and yourselves are reflexive pronouns.
Fill in the blanks in the sentences below with the correct
reflexive pronoun.
1. Be careful and don’t hurt
.
2. After I go swimming, I dry
with a towel.
3. Your baby sister can’t feed
.
4. He made
dizzy by spinning around and around.
5. Let’s give
a break and try again later.
6. The bird washed
in the puddle.
7. Boys, please get
ready for dinner.
8. The gardener shut the door and locked
in the shed.
9. My grandfather almost fell, but he caught
.
10. Look at
! You’re covered in mud!
11. I tried to reach the towel
.
12. He looked at
in the mirror.
13. We can plant that tree
.
14. My sister cannot feed
without some help.
15. You can help
to some cookies.
The Blind Hunter • Grade 4/ Unit 4
104
At Home: Have your child write three sentences using
refl exive pronouns.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• Use a subject pronoun as the subject of a sentence.
• Use an object pronoun after an action verb or after a word
such as for, at, of, with, or to.
Read the sentences below. Then write the correct pronouns on
the lines provided to complete each sentence.
1. My brother and
saw a blind woman walking down
the street.
2. was using a cane to  nd her way.
3. When people saw
coming, they moved over to let
her pass.
4. How does the woman know where
is going?
5. It might be hard for
to run errands.
6. He told
that she might count the steps to her
destination.
7. Do you know what
think?
8. I think she does
by smell.
9. What do
mean, by smell?
10. Each street has its own smell, and that’s how she tells
apart.
11. Do
have some extra money?
12. gave my brother some change.
13. could smell the hot dog stand around the corner.
14. This was going to be a good day for
.
The Blind Hunter • Grade 4/ Unit 4
105
At Home: Ask your child to write three sentences describing
something he or she can’t see, using one pronoun in each
sentence.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Proofreading
• Use a subject pronoun as the subject of a sentence.
I, you, he, she, it, we and they are subject pronouns.
• Use an object pronoun after an action verb or after a word
such as for, at, of, with, or to.
Me, you, him, her, it, us, and them are object pronouns.
Read the paragraphs below. Circle every pronoun that is not
used correctly.
Someone gave I directions to the museum
You and us need to walk to Maple Street. Then turn right at Oak Street.
Mr. Exeter lives there. Him and me go on walks sometimes. If him is in his yard,
he will give a big wave to you and I.
When we got to the museum, we saw Mrs. Peters. Her and my dad went
to school together. Them often like the same paintings
Rewrite the passage above. Use the correct forms of the
pronouns. Be sure to use capital letters and end punctuation
correctly.
The Blind Hunter • Grade 4/ Unit 4
106
At Home: Ask your child to write a short paragraph about
what it would be like to visit a museum if you can’t see.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Subject and
Object Pronouns
A. Circle the pronoun or pronouns in parentheses that correctly
complete each sentence.
1. (He, Him) and the older man went on a journey.
2. I hurt (me, myself) while walking in the woods.
3. I gave (them, they)  ve feathers from my collection.
4. (Him, He) and I are going hunting.
5. My parents helped (we, us) with the arrows.
6. My brother found the stones (him, himself).
7. (Them, They) are older than what I have.
8. I thought (we, us) were going the other way.
B. Write the pronoun that completes each sentence.
9. He showed
how I should plant the seeds.
10. We sent
a message, and they sent one back.
11. She likes to watch birds. It’s fun for
.
12. We need to make breakfast—the eggs won’t cook
!
13. He’s wise and everyone respects
.
14. Let’s see where
is going.
15. You must learn to respect
.
The Blind Hunter • Grade 4/ Unit 4
107
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Review: Subject and
Object Pronouns
• Use a subject pronoun as the subject of a sentence.
I, you, he, she, it, we and they are subject pronouns.
• Use an object pronoun after an action verb or after a word
such as for, at, of, with, or to.
Me, you, him, her, it, us, and them are object pronouns.
Read each of the sentences below. Then fill in the blanks with
the pronoun that completes each of the sentences.
1. My dad likes birds.
knows all about
.
2. He and I watch birds together.
do
every weekend.
3. My mom doesn’t go because
thinks
is boring.
4. When
bring my little sister, my dad carries
in a backpack.
5. usually bring my lunch. If my dad is hungry, I share it
with
.
6. When
get home, my feet hurt because
are very tired.
Always write the pronoun I with a capital letter.
• Use I or me last when talking about yourself and another
person.
Mechanics
The Blind Hunter • Grade 4/ Unit 4
108
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Pronoun-Verb
Agreement
A present-tense verb must agree with its subject pronoun.
Add -s to most action verbs when you use the pronouns he,
she, and it.
Do not add -s to an action verb in the present tense when
you use the pronouns I, we, you, and they.
Write the correct form of the underlined action verb to complete
each sentence.
1. My car use
less gas than yours.
2. Windmills make
energy from the wind.
3. Every few years my dad buy
a new truck.
4. Fossil fuels pollute
the environment.
5. Scientists help people because they look
for new
ways to make energy.
6. My mom put
up solar panels at her job.
7. Ed’s sister design
hybrid cars.
8. Rasheed know
a great deal about electricity.
9. Where I live, we get
energy from the river.
10. Peter’s grandfather work
in an oil  eld.
11. My uncle ride
a bike to work.
12. The burning of coal send
soot into the air.
13. We need
more twigs to start the  re.
14. Our teacher hike
in the mountains.
Energy: Power Source
Grade 4/Unit 4
109
At Home: Have your child write a short paragraph
describing three ways she or he uses energy every day.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Pronoun-Verb
Agreement
• The verbs have and be have special forms in the present
tense.
Have Be
I have We have I am We are
You have You have You are You are
He/She/It has They have He/She/It is They are
Write the correct form of the underlined verb to complete each
sentence.
1. I has
a way to tell which house is yours.
2. Your house have
six solar panels on its roof.
3. We has
had them since last year.
4. They be
helping us save energy.
5. They have
already saved us some money.
6. I be
trying to get my friends to get solar panels.
7. I think Fred and Elliot be
going to buy some.
8. Bill be
helping protect the environment.
9. Helen are
good with tools.
10. She have
a big truck that she uses on the job.
11. We be
building an addition to our house.
12. Dad have
to nail the beams.
13. We be
putting in two windows.
14. Now you has
a good design.
Energy: Power Source
Grade 4/Unit 4
110
At Home: Have your child write three sentences using a
subject pronoun and the appropriate form of be or have.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• A contraction is a shortened form of two words.
A contraction can be made by combining certain verbs with
the word not.
An apostrophe (’) shows where at least one letter is missing.
Examples of contractions: is + not = isn’t, did + not = didn’t
Common Contractions:
am is are have has had will
I I’m I’ve I’d I’ll
he he’s he’s he’d he’ll
she she’s she’s she’d she’ll
it it’s it’s it’d it’ll
we we’re we’ve we’d we’ll
you you’re you’ve you’d you’ll
they they’re they’ve they’d they’ll
Write the contraction for the underlined words in each sentence.
1. He had never seen a hybrid car before.
2. His mom told him, “I think you will like the new car.”
3. “I am so excited to see it,” he said.
4. “Let me nish this article and then I will show it to you.”
5. After a few minutes, she said, “I have just  nished. Let’s go.”
6. “Let’s wait for Dad. He will be here around three o’clock.”
7. “You are right, Mom. I do like it.”
8. “It is very special.”
111
Energy: Power Source
Grade 4/Unit 4
At Home: Using contractions, have your child write three
sentences about something he or she saw for the fi rst time.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Proofreading
A present-tense verb must agree with its subject pronoun.
• Add –s to most action verbs when you use the pronouns he,
she, and it.
Do not add –s to an action verb in the present tense when
you use the pronouns I, we, you, and they.
• The verbs have and be have special forms in the present tense.
Rewrite the following story. Be sure all verbs agree with their
pronouns.
Working on the North Slope
Right now, I is far from my family. I is working in a place called the
North Slope. That is way up in Alaska. I has only been here for about a
month, but my friends Steve and Rob has been here for about two years. We
is here to build an oil pipeline. A few years ago, they found oil north of here.
Now, we is building a pipeline. When it is done, they will be able to put the
oil on ships. It will be at least two years before the job are over. I am glad to
be working, but I will be happy to see my family again.
Energy: Power Source
Grade 4/Unit 4
112
At Home: Ask your child to fi nd three sentences in the story
where a contraction is possible.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Pronoun-Verb
Agreement
A. Write the correct form of the underlined action verb or verbs
in each sentence.
1. My sister love
learning about electricity.
2. When she grow
up, she want
to
be an electrician.
3. She know
how to use all kinds of tools.
4. She and our dad  xes
things around the house.
5. She read
books about how things work.
6. Sometimes my sister and I works
on projects
together.
7. We designs
a simple lamp.
8. My sister and I helps
dad with projects.
B. Write the correct form of have or be to complete each
sentence.
9. I
a friend who works on a wind farm.
10. The wind farm
on top of a hill.
11. The windmills there
very tall.
12. Each windmill
three blades.
13. My friend
a small of ce nearby.
14. I
going to visit him this weekend.
15. We
taking a tour of the wind farm.
16. It
miles and miles of land.
Energy: Power Source
Grade 4/Unit 4
113
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Review: Pronoun-Verb
Agreement
A present-tense verb must agree with its subject pronoun.
• Add -s to most action verbs when you use the pronouns he,
she, and it.
Do not add -s to an action verb in the present tense when
you use the pronouns I, we, you, and they.
• The verbs have and be have special forms in the present tense.
Mechanics
Use quotation marks at the beginning and end of a person’s
exact words.
Begin a quotation with a capital letter.
Begin a new paragraph each time a new person speaks.
Rewrite the following sentences in dialogue form. Correct any
problems in pronoun-verb agreement. Be sure to add quotation marks
where they belong.
1. Bill, you has a new bike said Liz.
2. Yes. And my sister have a lot of bikes he said.
3. Where is they asked Liz.
4. They is in the garage said Bill.
5. What do she do with them asked Liz.
6. She like to  x them up he said.
Energy: Power Source
Grade 4/Unit 4
114
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
• A possessive pronoun takes the place of a possessive
noun. It shows who or what owns something.
Some possessive pronouns are used before nouns (my,
your, his, her, its, our, your, their).
Rewrite the underlined parts of the sentences using possessive
pronouns and nouns.
1. Adelina’s father works on a boat, and the grandfather of Adelina does,
too.
2. The houses in Adelina’s village are small.
3. The village is busy, and the village’s visitors come from all over the
world.
4. Her family’s job is to take people to see the whales.
5. The whales come to the village to have the whales’ babies.
6. Adelina’s grandfather’s stories are fascinating, and the grandfather’s
job is, too.
7. If you go to Adelina’s village, be sure to bring the camera that belongs
to you.
8. Robert learned about La Laguna from Robert’s friend Melissa.
9. Robert and I went there for the vacation we had last winter.
10. I took a lot of pictures for the photo album that belongs to me.
Possessive
Pronouns
Adelina’s Whales • Grade 4/ Unit 4
115
At Home: Ask your child to write three sentences using
possessive pronouns.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
• Some possessive pronouns can stand alone (mine, yours,
his, hers, its, ours, yours, theirs)
In each sentence, replace the underlined incorrect possessive
pronoun with the correct one on the line provided.
1. That is your boat, but this one is my’s.
2. Your’s is the smaller life-vest, the blue one.
3. I don’t have my own, but my brother let me use he’s.
4. You have your oars. Where are my?
5. I wanted to ask Mercedes if I could use her’s, but she wasn’t at home.
6. We are off, and the whole day is our!
7. Paco and Pepe say this beach is they’s, but it’s not.
8. I forgot my lunch, so will you share your?
9. Is that cooler her’s?
10. The  shing shack on the right is he’s.
11. Should we go to his  shing shack or your?
12. That tackle box is not our.
13. It’s handle is broken.
14. That pretty hat is my.
15. Those shoes are her’s.
Possessive
Pronouns
Adelina’s Whales • Grade 4/ Unit 4
116
At Home: Have your child write three sentences using the
possessive pronouns: mine, yours, and ours.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
Add an apostrophe and -s to a singular noun to make it
possessive.
Add an apostrophe to make most plural nouns possessive.
Add an apostrophe and -s to form the possessive of plural
nouns that do not end in -s.
Possessive pronouns do not have apostrophes.
Read the sentences below. Replace the underlined incorrect
possessive noun in each sentence with the correct one on the
line provided.
1. My friends grandfather was a  sherman.
2. A  shermans life is not always easy.
3. He must wake with mornings  rst light.
4. Sometimes the waves power tosses his boat.
5. The captains’ crew must be strong and able.
6. They say that grandfather’s boat was once lifted up on a whales back.
7. He could see the animals’ great tail behind him.
8. The tails’ splash against the water frightened him.
9. The boat was dropped back into the seas foamy waters.
10. The whales’ great body disappeared below the surface.
Adelina’s Whales • Grade 4/ Unit 4
117
At Home: Ask your child to write two sentences imagining
what a fi sherman’s life is like. Have your child use
possessive pronouns.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
• Some possessive pronouns are used before nouns (my,
your, his, her, its, our, your, their).
• Some possessive pronouns can stand alone (mine, yours,
his, hers, its, ours, yours, theirs).
Rewrite the following paragraph. Be sure all possessive nouns
and pronouns are used correctly.
Me name is Robert and this is mine wife, Florence. That’s her’ given
name, but she prefers to be called Fluffy. Let us show you around our’s
home. Down the hall we have our’s of ces. The one on the left is mines, and
the one on the right is Fluffy’s. My of ce is where we keep our’s jewels.
They were my mother’s. My father bought them for her on he’s many trips
abroad. He used to travel a lot in order to study whales. On his’s trips, he
met some of the world’s top scientists. Theirs knowledge of whales was
amazing.
Proofreading
Adelina’s Whales • Grade 4/ Unit 4
118
At Home: Ask your child to write three sentences using one
possessive noun or possessive pronoun in each sentence.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Circle the letter before the possessive pronoun that correctly
completes each sentence.
1. Adelina’s village was small, and
main street had only
a few houses.
a his
b our
c its
d their
2. The whales came to Mexico to have
young.
a their
b your
c my
d her
3. Although
rst visit to La Laguna was in June, this year
I’m going in January.
a his’s
b theirs
c my
d her
4. Adelina knows the ocean very well, because
whole
family works on the water.
a my
b their
c our
d her
5. Pachico made a sign for his business, and
letters are
large and easy to read.
a hers
b their
c its
d my
Test: Possessive
Pronouns
Adelina’s Whales • Grade 4/ Unit 4
119
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Review: Possessive
Pronouns
• Some possessive pronouns are used before nouns (my,
your, his, her, its, our, your, their).
• Some possessive pronouns can stand alone (mine, yours,
his, hers, its, ours, yours, theirs).
Mechanics
Add an apostrophe and an -s to a singular noun to make it
possessive.
Add an apostrophe to make most plural nouns possessive.
Add an apostrophe and -s to form the possessive of plural
nouns that do not end in -s.
Possessive pronouns do not have apostrophes.
Read the sentences below about a girl who gets swallowed by
a whale. Then, rewrite each sentence, replacing the underlined
possessive pronouns with possessive nouns.
1. Its mouth was as big as a cave.
2. In came a great rush of water, washing her down its throat.
3. Her eyes had to get used to the darkness in the whale’s belly.
4. Soon she saw she was lying in a pile of  sh. Their scales were stuck to
her whole body.
5. She knew her father was nearby. She thought she could hear the motor
of his boat. She hoped he would rescue her.
Adelina’s Whales • Grade 4/ Unit 4
120
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Pronouns and
Homophones
Its, their, and your are possessive pronouns.
It’s, they’re, and you’re are contractions for it is, they are,
and you are.
Be careful not to confuse possessive pronouns with
contractions that sound the same.
Read each sentence below. Then circle the correct word in
parentheses to complete each sentence.
1. If we don’t protect the coral reefs, (their, they’re) likely to die.
2. If you visit a coral reef, (your, you’re) sure to see many wonderful
creatures.
3. When you go, remember to bring (your, you’re) snorkel.
4. (Its, It’s) important to understand that corals are living things.
5. (Their, They’re) lives depend on many things being in balance.
6. Because of all the tiny spaces in the Great Barrier Reef, (its, it’s) a
great place for a  sh to hide.
7. (Its, It’s) off the coast of Australia.
8. Surely (your, you’re) amazed that the Great Barrier is 1,250 miles long.
9. Imagine all the sea life that lives in all (its, it’s) cracks and holes.
10. (Your, You’re) going to enjoy your visit to the reef.
11. You don’t have to dive far to see (its, it’s) beauty.
12. Don’t forget (your, you’re)  ippers.
13. Fish stay in (their, they’re) own groups.
14. The mother stays with (its, it’s) young.
At Home in the Coral Reef
Grade 4/ Unit 4
121
At Home: Ask your child to write three sentences using a
homophone pair in each one. For example: They’re their own
worst critics.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Pronoun and
Contraction
Homophones
Its, their, and your are possessive pronouns.
It’s, they’re, and you’re are contractions for it is, they are,
and you are.
• The word there means “in that place.” It sounds just like their
and they’re.
Write the homophone that correctly completes each sentence.
1. their they’re there
Go to a coral reef and explore the warm, clear waters
.
2. Its It’s
not uncommon to  nd corals in many bright colors.
3. their they’re there
Corals belong to a family of animals, and
relatives
include jelly sh and anemones.
4. Its It’s
even possible to  nd corals growing on shipwrecks.
5. its it’s
A sponge eats by pumping water through tiny holes in
body.
6. their they’re there
The bottom of the ocean is a busy place, and many creatures live
.
7. your you’re
Which one is
favorite: the sea stars, the sand dollars,
or the spiny lobsters?
8. their they’re there
No matter which one is your favorite,
all important to
life under the sea.
At Home in the Coral Reef
Grade 4/ Unit 4
122
At Home: Have your child write sentences that include the
homophones its, it’s, your, you’re, their, they’re, there.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
• An apostrophe takes the place of letters left out of a contraction.
Possessive pronouns do not have apostrophes.
Be careful not to confuse possessive pronouns with contractions.
A. Read the pairs of sentences below. Then write the correct
form of the underlined incorrect contraction or possessive
pronoun on the line.
1. Have you heard about underwater parks? Their places where sea life is
protected.
2. Fish and people both have homes. The ocean is there’s and the land is ours.
3. Clean water is important for sea life. Its like clean air for us.
4. A lobster’s skeleton is on the outside of it’s body. Where’s you’re skeleton?
5. Do you want to see the reef? Your going to need a snorkel.
B. Read each sentence below. Then decide if the underlined
word in each sentence is a possessive noun or a contraction.
Write your answer on the line provided.
6. The world’s oceans are home to thousands of miles of coral reefs.
7. It’s  lled with wonders.
8. Some people think that coral is a plant, but really it’s an animal.
9. Coral’s relatives have soft, jelly-like bodies.
10. The hawksbill turtle is one of the reef’s many visitors.
At Home in the Coral Reef
Grade 4/ Unit 4
123
At Home: Have your child choose a singular noun and use it
as a possessive noun.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Proofreading
Its, their, and your are possessive pronouns.
It’s, they’re, and you’re are contractions for it is, they are,
and you are.
• The word there means “in that place.” It sounds just like their
and they’re.
Rewrite each sentence in the following short essay. There are 6
homophone mistakes.
Most people care about there environment and do things to protect it. But
places exist here and their that we don’t see every day. Its important to take
care of them, too. This summer I visited a beautiful coral reef. But a coral
reef isn’t just a nice place to visit. Its also like a neighborhood. It’s millions
of cracks and holes are home to many kinds of sea creatures. When I visited
their, I learned that people have to take care of the oceans, not just the land.
At Home in the Coral Reef
Grade 4/ Unit 4
124
At Home: Have your child add two sentences to the
paragraph. Be sure he or she uses one of the homophones
studied in this unit.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Pronouns
and Homophones
Read each sentence. Choose either the possessive pronoun or
the contraction to complete the sentences.
its it’s
Although coral is hard,
made by a soft, jelly-like
animal. When the soft animal dies, it leaves behind
skeleton, which is called a polyp. Thousands and thousands of corals
begin to form a big pile. After a long time,
not just
a pile, but a coral reef.
your you’re
When
swimming underwater, be sure to bring
scuba gear and goggles.
sure
to see many amazing sights there.
their they’re there
If the water is clear and warm, coral reefs may grow
. After the corals of the reefs release
eggs, the eggs become baby corals. For a few
weeks afterward,
floating through the sea, looking
for a hard surface. Once
near one, they settle
. Then
growth depends on
temperature, salt, and sunlight.
its it’s
When a coral reef forms,
like an underwater city.
Each tiny plant inside the coral animals contributes
colors. When this “city” grows,
a home for millions
of small sea animals.
At Home in the Coral Reef
Grade 4/ Unit 4
125
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Review: Pronouns
and Homophones
Its, their, and your are possessive pronouns.
It’s, they’re, and you’re are contractions for it is, they are,
and you are.
• The word there means “in that place.” It sounds just like their
and they’re.
Mechanics
• An apostrophe takes the place of letters left out of a contraction.
Possessive pronouns do not have apostrophes.
Use the words above each paragraph to complete the sentences.
its it’s
a challenge for sponges to eat. A sponge must
push seawater through the many holes in
body.
The tiny plants and animals in the water are
food.
their they’re there
When I explored underwater, I saw mollusks. Some mollusks have
soft bodies inside
hard shells.
protected by the thick shells. Some mollusks, such as octopuses,
squirt water from
bodies in order to move.
your you’re
Suppose
a squid who lives near a coral reef. What
animals would be part of
diet?
At Home in the Coral Reef
Grade 4/ Unit 4
126
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Read each passage. Then choose the pronoun or contraction
that belongs in each space. Circle your answer.
“Mrs. LaRue, everyone thinks the Hibbins’s cats are well behaved. But
(1) certainly aren’t! I was up all night listening to (2) ghting.
Please take me home!”
Unit Review: Pronouns
1. A. he
B. they
C. you
D. I
2. E. me
F. you
G. him
H. them
Chirobo was a wise man. (3) would always take time to answer
people’s questions. Not only was he wise, he was also kind to children.
(4) would tell them stories.
3. A. He
B. She
C. They
D. We
4. E. He
F. She
G. They
H. We
Although many countries rely on fossil fuels, (5) not a perfect source
of energy. The use of oil has led to pollution. Also, some countries, such as
Japan, produce very little of (6) own oil.
5. A. her
B. hers
C. theirs
D. they’re
6. E. her
F. hers
G. theirs
H. their
Review Test • Grade 4/ Unit 4
127
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Laguna San Ignacio is just a little village, but one thing makes it different
from any other town. (7) the only place where giant gray whales spend
time with humans. The whales swim near the shore. They lift (8) heads
to look at villagers like Adelina.
Unit Review: Pronouns
7. A. It’s
B. Its
C. They’re
D. Their
8. E. you’re
F. their
G. they’re
H. your
It’s important to keep track of tides. For example,  shermen need to
know when the water will be high enough for (9) boats to travel out to
sea. And tide waters affect animals, too. (10) responsible for bringing
fresh oxygen for some sea animals.
9. A. they’re
B. their
C. there
D. theirs
10. E. They’re
F. Their
G. There
H. Theirs
Review Test • Grade 4/ Unit 4
128
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Adjectives are words that describe nouns or pronouns. For
example, adjectives may tell what a noun or pronoun looks,
sounds, smells, tastes, or feels like.
Adjectives may be placed before a noun or pronoun.
Adjectives may come after the words a, an, and the.
Adjectives may follow a linking verb.
Use commas to separate three or more adjectives in a series.
Read the sentences below. Write each adjective on the line
provided. Some sentences may have more than one adjective.
1. Florida has big mosquitoes.
2. Miss Franny wanted a little house with lots of books.
3. That short, smart woman is the librarian.
4. She feared that she would seem like a silly woman.
5. This book is long and dif cult.
6. The large bear had a strong smell.
7. The bear looked dangerous.
8. Winn-Dixie had clean, sharp teeth.
9. Miss Franny’s father was rich.
10. When she saw the dog, she let out a loud, high scream.
11. The dog was friendly and clean.
12. The bookshelves are high.
13. Her father had a loud, scratchy voice.
14. The road was not steep at all.
Adjectives
Because of Winn-Dixie
Grade 4/ Unit 5
129
At Home: Have your child write three sentences using
adjectives.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Proper adjectives are formed from proper nouns.
A proper adjective begins with a capital letter.
Common adjectives are not formed from proper nouns.
Do not capitalize common adjectives.
On the line, rewrite each proper adjective correctly.
1. Today I sat and read in the herman w. block room at the library.
2. I read a book about bears who live in the michigan woods.
3. I also learned that mosquitoes live in the  orida swamps.
4. I read about a chinese custom of having brides wear red at weddings.
5. The room had a shelf of books about asian countries.
6. This library has more books than both pleasantville libraries put together.
7. I won’t miss the chill of minnesota winters.
8. I lived near the canadian border, where it got very cold.
9. That reminds me, I want to  nd a book on eskimo life.
10. I already read a book on native american tribes.
Proper Adjectives
Because of Winn-Dixie
Grade 4/ Unit 5
130
At Home: Have your child look through science or social
studies books and list any proper adjectives he or she fi nds.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Do not use a comma to separate a single adjective from a noun.
When only two adjectives are used together, separate them
with a comma or and. Do not use both.
Use commas to separate three or more adjectives in a series.
When you are using only two adjectives before a noun, some
adjectives do not need to be separated with commas. These
adjectives describe color, size, or age: a woman with short
gray hair.
Do not use commas or and to separate a common adjective
from a proper adjective: the hot Alabama summers.
Rewrite each sentence on the line provided. Be sure to
punctuate the sentences correctly.
1. The library is just a little, old, house with lots of books.
2. My dog is friendly, and, calm.
3. The bear came out of the wild, Florida forest.
4. The book was long interesting and hard.
5. That snobby, young girl just came into the library.
6. The bear put his big, and black nose in the air.
7. I grew up in a small, town.
8. I enjoyed the bright colorful exciting pictures in this book.
Name
Mechanics
Because of Winn-Dixie
Grade 4/ Unit 5
131
At Home: Have your child write sentences using multiple
adjectives without commas.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Adjectives describe nouns or pronouns.
Proper adjectives are formed from proper nouns.
A proper adjective begins with a capital letter.
Common adjectives are not formed from proper nouns.
Do not capitalize common adjectives.
Rewrite each sentence in the paragraph below. Remember to
use commas and and correctly with adjectives. Capitalize proper
adjectives. Use a separate page if you need to.
The little, bookstore on the corner is different from the huge, Smithville
bookstore in town. Both stores have lots of interesting, and exciting books.
But that’s the only way they are alike. The small, blue, store on the corner
is warm dim. It is  lled with old and, unusual books. This store is not like
the big smithville store. The Smithville store is bright, and cool. It has new,
books by famous popular writers. There is even a counter where you can get
a hot sweet tasty cup of cocoa.
Proofreading
Because of Winn-Dixie
Grade 4/ Unit 5
132
At Home: Have your child write fi ve practice sentences
using adjectives to exchange with a family member.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
A. Complete each sentence with an adjective from the box
below. Remember to capitalize any proper adjectives.
reddish atlantic british lonely ohio
1. My dog gets
when he’s by himself.
2. I gathered shells on the sandy
shore.
3. My dog’s hair is long and
.
4. We live in a little
town.
5. The librarian’s voice sounded
.
B. Choose the group of words that best completes each
sentence. Circle the letter of your choice.
6. I brought home a
kitten.
a. uffy, white,
b. uffy white
7. The house was
.
a. warm and cozy
b. warm, and cozy
8. Her dog is
.
a. large, brown, and shy
b. large brown and shy
9. This book contains
words.
a. common spanish
b. common Spanish
10. The car had
tags.
a. yellow New Jersey
b. yellow, New Jersey
Test: Common and
Proper Adjectives
Because of Winn-Dixie
Grade 4/ Unit 5
133
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Adjectives describe nouns or pronouns.
Proper adjectives are formed from proper nouns.
A proper adjective begins with a capital letter.
Common adjectives are not formed from proper nouns.
Do not capitalize common adjectives.
Read the sentences below. Then find the adjectives that are not written
correctly. Rewrite the sentences on the lines below, correcting any mistakes.
1. A guide dog helped the blind, young, man.
2. They walked through the sunny arizona city.
3. The dog stepped over a prickly, cactus.
4. My dog likes to eat mexican food.
5. He’s a funny kind helpful dog.
Mechanics
Do not use a comma to separate a single adjective from a noun.
When only two adjectives are used together, separate them
with a comma or and. Do not use both.
When you are using only two adjectives before a noun, some
adjectives do not need to be separated with commas or and.
These adjectives describe color, size, or age: a woman with
short gray hair.
Do not use commas or and to separate a common adjective
from a proper adjective: the hot Alabama summers.
Use commas to separate three or more adjectives in a series.
Review: Common and
Proper Adjectives
Because of Winn-Dixie
Grade 4/ Unit 5
134
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Articles
The words a, an, and the are special adjectives called articles.
Use a and an with singular nouns.
Use a if the next word starts with a consonant sound.
Use an if the next word starts with a vowel sound.
Complete each sentence by writing the correct article, a or an.
1. Félipé was
spoiled child.
2. He was upset because he had lost
arrow.
3. The arrow had landed in
well.
4. Ranita the frog had been put under
spell.
5. Félipé tried to think of
excuse not to keep his promise.
6. He had promised to give Ranita
kiss.
7. He was hoping it was all
bad dream.
8. wise woman had cast the spell on Ranita.
9. Ranita didn’t think
brat like Félipé would make a
good husband.
10. Pepé’s kiss changed her from
ugly frog to a beautiful
princess.
11. Both Félipé and Ranita refused to get
glass of water
for Vieja Sabia.
12. The viceroy believed that even
important person had
to keep his promises.
13. viceroy has many things to be concerned about.
14. Ranita wore
old hat that belonged to her
grandmother.
135
Ranita, the Frog Princess
Grade 4/ Unit 5
At Home: Have your child write three sentences describing
characters in the story. Have your child use a and an in his
or her descriptions.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
More Articles
Use the with singular nouns that name a particular person,
place, or thing.
Use the before all plural nouns.
Read each sentence. Put one line under each article. Put two
lines under the noun that each article points out.
1. The arrow was golden.
2. Félipé thought Ranita was only a frog.
3. Everyone must keep promises, even the children of kings.
4. Pepé feared it would be a long night.
5. Ranita thought Pepé would be the best husband.
6. Félipé ordered Pepé to kiss the frog.
7. Ranita was an unexpected guest.
8. The servants didn’t like Félipé much.
9. Vieja Sabia taught both children a lesson in manners.
10. The viceroy argued with his wife.
11. Ranita was actually a Mayan princess.
12. Félipé refused to go to the wedding of Ranita and Pepé.
13. The frog was hopeful for a change.
14. Pepé wore a long cloak.
15. The townspeople did not know the frog.
16. One guest had an overnight bag.
136
Ranita, the Frog Princess
Grade 4/ Unit 5
At Home: Have your child write three sentences about
the story. Help your child circle the articles in his or her
sentences.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
Use a and an with singular nouns.
Use a if the next word starts with a consonant sound.
Use an if the next word starts with a vowel sound.
Use the with singular nouns that name a particular person,
place, or thing.
Use the before all plural nouns.
Each sentence is missing two articles. Add the articles and write
the sentences correctly.
1. Who is boy who lost golden arrow?
2. Until he went to well, Félipé had never seen talking frog.
3. Ranita asked wise woman to turn her into girl again.
4. Wife of the viceroy spoiled children.
5. Cook said, “I added  y to your soup for the frog.”
6. Adding the  y to soup was excellent idea.
7. Ranita told woman, “I was sel sh child.”
8. Why is boy feeding birds?
137
Ranita, the Frog Princess
Grade 4/ Unit 5
At Home: Ask your child to write a few sentences explaining
the message of the story. Remind him or her to use articles
correctly.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Proofreading
Use a and an with singular nouns.
Use a if the next word starts with a consonant sound.
Use an if the next word starts with a vowel sound.
Use the with singular nouns that name a particular person,
place, or thing.
Use the before all plural nouns.
Rewrite each sentence in the poster below. Remember to use a,
an, and the correctly. Add articles where they are missing.
VICEROY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ANNOUNCES
A THIRD ANNUAL ARTS AND CRAFTS SHOW!
show will take place on Saturday, March 28
If you have a art project or an craft project to display,
please let fourth-grade art teacher know.
Gift card worth $30 will be awarded
to artist who wins first place.
138
Ranita, the Frog Princess
Grade 4/ Unit 5
At Home: Have your child rewrite and decorate his or her
poster.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Articles
A. Circle the letter before the sentence that uses articles correctly.
1. a. Frog is not allowed to eat from my plate.
b. An frog is not an very clean animal.
c. I would not share my dinner with a frog.
2. a. Mayan emperor’s daughter had spell cast on her.
b. Who would have believed she was the Mayan emperor’s daughter?
c. A wise woman said manners were important.
3. a. I liked the character of Pepé, the servant.
b. Pepé, the servant, is funny character.
c. Pepé becomes an husband to Ranita.
4. a. What is moral of story?
b. I enjoyed the story.
c. Tell me a important event from the story.
B. Circle the letter before the article that correctly completes
each sentence.
5. Which of
characters did you like best?
a. a
b. an
c. the
6. There wasn’t
happy ending for Félipé.
a. a
b. an
c. the
7. Did Ranita
frog really sleep in Félipé’s bed?
a. a
b. an
c. the
8. Félipé didn’t think he had to be nice to Ranita, since she was only
animal.
a. a
b. an
c. the
139
Ranita, the Frog Princess
Grade 4/ Unit 5
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Review: More Articles
Use a and an with singular nouns.
Use a if the next word starts with a consonant sound.
Use an if the next word starts with a vowel sound.
Use the with singular nouns that name a particular person,
place, or thing.
Use the before all plural nouns.
Read the sentences about what the characters might be saying
in the picture below. Rewrite the sentences on the lines below,
adding articles where they are needed.
1. FÉLIPÉ: That was not just arrow—it was golden arrow!
2. RANITA: If I rescue arrow, you must make me promise.
3. VIEJA SABIA: Ranita, I will take you to hunting lodge of the viceroy.
4. RANITA: Be sure to set place for me at dinner table!
140
Ranita, the Frog Princess
Grade 4/ Unit 5
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Adjectives
That Compare
Add -er to most adjectives to compare two people, places,
or things.
Add -est to most adjectives to compare more than two.
Read each sentence. Underline the adjective in parentheses that
correctly completes the sentence.
1. Have you ever imagined exploring the (deeper, deepest) waters of the
ocean?
2. The sun looks (brighter, brightest) on the water than it does on land.
3. The Paci c Ocean looks (clearer, clearest) than the Atlantic Ocean.
4. The blue whale is the (larger, largest) mammal of all.
5. The deep water is (colder, coldest) than the shallow water by the shore.
6. This mussel shell is the (prettier, prettiest) shell I found today.
7. I think scuba divers are the (braver, bravest) of all explorers.
8. It is so much (quieter, quietest) under water than it is on the surface.
9. The colors of this  sh are the (stranger, strangest) I have ever seen.
10. Andrea is a (faster, fastest) swimmer than Eric.
11. Which of the waves do you think is (higher, highest)?
12. My towel is (sandier, sandiest) than yours.
13. This  sh is (smaller, smallest) than the other one.
14. My shell collection is (better, best) than Ralph’s.
15. This rock is the (heavier, heaviest) of them.
16. Andrea can stay a oat (longer, longest) than Cyril can.
Exploring the Undersea Territory
Grade 4/ Unit 5
141
At Home: Have your child write each adjective in parentheses on an
index card. With a family member, have your child take turns drawing
a card and using the adjectives in sentences of his or her own.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Adjectives
That Compare
Add -er to most adjectives to compare two people, places,
or things.
Add -est to most adjectives to compare more than two.
For adjectives ending in e, drop the e before adding -er
or -est.
For adjectives ending in a consonant and y, change the y to i
before adding -er or -est.
For adjectives that have a single vowel before a final
consonant, double the final consonant before adding -er
or -est.
Rewrite the sentences below, correcting the form or spelling of
the underlined adjective.
1. After the sun went down, the air felt chilliest than before.
2. I think  sh feel freeer in the ocean than they do in tanks.
3. Dad caught the bigest  sh of all.
4. I wonder which ocean is the saltyest.
5. The dolphin is one of the smartiest animals.
6. The water is calmmer than it was yesterday.
7. My clothes are wettest than they were this morning.
8. That shark has the paleest skin I’ve ever seen.
Exploring the Undersea Territory
Grade 4/ Unit 5
142
At Home: Ask your child to make a chart of fi ve different
adjectives to compare by adding -er and -est. Have your child write
the three forms of each adjective (such as hot, hotter, hottest).
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
A proper noun or adjective begins with a capital letter.
The name of a day, month, or holiday begins with a capital
letter.
Capitalize family names if they refer to specific people.
Capitalize titles of people before names.
Read the sentences below. Then correct the capitalization
mistakes. Rewrite the sentences on the lines provided.
1. The beach was closed after labor day.
2. The dead sea is the lowest place in the world.
3. The north paci c octopus can grow to over 100 pounds.
4. I learned this from dr. stevenson, an expert on ocean life.
5. We are going scuba diving on sunday.
6. We are bringing grandpa along.
7. Jacques cousteau was a famous french undersea explorer.
8. Cousteau was born in june 1910 in france.
Exploring the Undersea Territory
Grade 4/ Unit 5
143
At Home: Ask your child to write four sentences that include
words that begin in a capital letter.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Proofreading
Rewrite the title and each sentence in the response to literature
below. Remember to use –er and –est endings correctly with
adjectives. Be sure to capitalize proper nouns, names, and titles.
Response to “exploring the undersea Territory”
I enjoyed reading this article. After learning about undersea explorers, I
think that the work they do is strangeer and scaryer than most people’s jobs.
But it is also more interesting.
One of the braveest explorers of all is sylvia Earle. She was nicknamed
“Her deepness” because in 1979 she made the deeper ocean dive any human
being had ever made alone. She went on to work as a businesswoman and as
a scientist at the National oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
Exploring the Undersea Territory
Grade 4/ Unit 5
144
At Home: Have your child write a paragraph about a career
that interests him or her. Remind your child to use adjectives
ending in -er and -est.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Adjectives
That Compare
A. Read each sentence. Write yes if the underlined adjective is the
correct form or the correct spelling. Write no if it is not the correct
form or the correct spelling.
1. Since the bottom of the ocean is the murkyest part, some deep-sea  sh
have feelers as well as eyes.
2. The small cookiecutter shark can catch and eat much larger  sh.
3. To me, jelly sh are the scaryest  sh.
4. This clown  sh has the brightest colors of all.
5. It’s chillyer in this water than over there.
6. That is the strangest looking shell of all.
B. Read each sentence. Use the correct form of the adjective in
parentheses. Write it on the line.
7. This lion sh has the (long)
spines I have ever seen!
8. Next to the green algae, the coral looked even (red)
than before.
9. You will be (safe)
if you wear a life preserver.
10. September is one of the (stormy)
months.
11. This  sh tastes (salty)
than the other one.
12. You look (pale)
than I do.
Exploring the Undersea Territory
Grade 4/ Unit 5
145
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Review: Adjectives
That Compare
Add -er to most adjectives to compare two people, places,
or things.
Add -est to most adjectives to compare more than two.
For adjectives ending in e, drop the e before adding -er
or -est.
For adjectives ending in a consonant and y, change the y to i
before adding -er or -est.
For adjectives that have a single vowel before a final
consonant, double the final consonant before adding -er
or -est.
Mechanics
Proper adjectives are formed from proper nouns.
A proper adjective or proper noun begins with a capital letter.
Read the sentences below. Look for mistakes in how adjectives are
formed and how words are capitalized. Rewrite the sentences
correctly.
1. The Great barrier Reef near australia is the largeest reef that living
creatures have built.
2. The sea turtles of australia are the cuter turtles I have ever seen.
3. The red bass is the olddest  sh on the great barrier reef.
4. Aunt carol said most clams are much tinyer than the giant clam.
Exploring the Undersea Territory
Grade 4/ Unit 5
146
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
For long adjectives, use more and most to compare people,
places, or things.
Use more to compare two people, places, or things.
Use most to compare more than two.
Write more or most to complete each sentence correctly.
1. Your lemon cake is the
delicious dessert of all.
2. Uncle Romie had an even
enormous belly than my
father.
3. He made the
interesting collage I have ever seen.
4. New York City is
exciting than my hometown.
5. But for me, North Carolina will always be the
comfortable place in the world.
6. Uncle Romie’s studio was the
glorious mess I had
ever seen!
7. I thought my birthday would be
pleasant if Aunt
Nanette were there.
8. This birthday turned out to be the
special birthday
ever.
9. Uncle Romie was
familiar with New York baseball
teams than I was.
10. This summer vacation was
enjoyable than last
year’s vacation.
11. Could this get
exciting than yesterday?
12. This is the
fun I’ve ever had.
Comparing with
More and Most
Me and Uncle Romie
Grade 4/ Unit 5
147
At Home: Ask your child to write four sentences of his or her
own, using adjectives from the above sentences. Have your
child use more and most in their sentences.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Comparing with
More and Most
For long adjectives, use more and most to compare people,
places, or things.
Use more to compare two people, places, or things.
Use most to compare more than two.
When you use more or most, do not use the ending -er or -est.
Rewrite each sentence. Use the correct form of the adjective.
1. Harlem is the more excitingest place I’ve ever been.
2. The sounds of the traf c outside made me feel more awaker than at home.
3. At  rst, Aunt Nanette seemed more caringer than Uncle Romie.
4. My visit to my grandparents’ house is the most peacefulest time I can
remember.
5. My aunt and uncle are most importanter to me than they used to be.
6. Uncle Romie is the most artisticest person I know.
7. I was more carefuller with this collage than I usually am.
8. My mother makes the more excellentest pepper jelly I have ever tasted.
Me and Uncle Romie
Grade 4/ Unit 5
148
At Home: Encourage your child to recall his or her favorite
place. Have your child describe the place in oral sentences
using -er, -est, more, and most.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
When you start a sentence with an introductory word that is
not part of the complete subject or predicate, follow it with a
comma.
Some common introductory words are yes, no, and well.
When the sentence begins by addressing someone by name,
use a comma after the name.
Rewrite the sentences below correctly. Use a comma after any
introductory word or name.
1. B. J. the train is coming now.
2. Well New York will certainly be different from North Carolina.
3. Uncle Romie did you make that project?
4. Yes I worked on it for months.
5. James I’m pleased to meet you.
6. Aunt Nanette I will miss you tomorrow.
7. No I am sorry, but I cannot come to your party.
8. Mama I missed you so much.
9. Yes I brought you a jar of pepper jelly.
10. No we did not expect to have twins.
Me and Uncle Romie
Grade 4/ Unit 5
149
At Home: Ask your child to write a few sentences of dialogue for
the characters in the story. Have your child start the sentences
with names or expressions such as yes, no, and well.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Proofreading
For long adjectives, use more and most to compare people,
places, or things.
Use more to compare two people, places, or things.
Use most to compare more than two.
Rewrite each sentence in the introduction speech below. Remember
to use more and most correctly with adjectives. Use a comma after an
introductory word used at the beginning of a sentence. Use a comma
when the first word in the sentence addresses someone by name.
Class I would like to introduce my Uncle Romie to you. I met him
last summer when I visited New York. He is the most creativest, most
imaginativest person I know! His work is more unusualer and more
powerfuler than any painting in a museum. Is he a painter? Is he a
photographer? Is he a writer? No he’s all of those at once. He puts paint,
pictures, newspapers, magazines, and other things together to make the most
amazing collages. His collage of Harlem is the more joyfulest picture I’ve
ever seen.Yes I have also started making collages, just like Uncle Romie.
Me and Uncle Romie
Grade 4/ Unit 5
150
At Home: Have your child read sentences from the
corrected speech aloud.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Comparing
with More and Most
A. In each sentence, find the adjective that compares.
Circle your answer.
1. My sister is more musical than my brother is.
a. sister
b. more musical
c. musical than
d. brother is
2. New York City is one of the most popular of all cities to visit.
a. New York
b. the most
c. most popular
d. all cities
3. My Aunt Nanette is the most generous person I know.
a. most generous
b. Aunt Nanette
c. generous person
d. I know
B. Choose the correct adjective to complete each sentence.
Circle your answer.
4. My sister was
about my trip than my brother was.
a. curious
b. curiouser
c. more curious
d. most curious
5. John is the
of all three children.
a. responsible
b. responsiblest
c. more responsible
d. most responsible
6. That is the
idea I ever heard.
a. original
b. originalest
c. more original
d. most original
Me and Uncle Romie
Grade 4/ Unit 5
151
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Review: Comparing
with More and Most
Read the sentences below. Look for mistakes in adjectives that
compare. Rewrite the sentences correctly. Then read them aloud.
1. Of all the students in our class, I was the eagerest to visit the art museum.
2. The rooms on the  rst  oor have old-fashioneder paintings than the
rooms on the second  oor.
3. The paintings on the third  oor are the modernest of all.
4. We decided packing a lunch would be economicaler than buying one.
Me and Uncle Romie
Grade 4/ Unit 5
152
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Use better to compare two people, places, or things.
Use best to compare more than two.
Write better or best to complete each sentence correctly.
1. The Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary is one of the
places to see wild horses.
2. My friend thinks horses are
companions than dogs.
3. Dayton Hyde thinks that running free is
for horses
than being stuck in one place.
4. He thought the
choice would be to fence the horses
in at  rst.
5. Because he grew up on a ranch, Dayton understands horses
than most of us do.
6. Life was
for most wild horses in the 1800s than it
was in the 1900s.
7. Conditions were
for population growth after a 1971
law outlawed the capture of wild horses.
8. Dayton Hyde created the
place for wild horses to run
free.
9. Horse ranches are the
places to learn to ride.
10. His horse is
at racing than mine is.
11. This is the
spot for a horse to drink.
12. Is it
to ride sidesaddle or western style?
Comparing
with Good
Wild Horses • Grade 4/ Unit 5
153
At Home: Have your child read an article in a newspaper or
magazine and circle each use of better or best.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Comparing
with Bad
Use worse to compare two people, places, or things.
Use worst to compare more than two.
Write worse or worst to complete each sentence correctly.
1. The invention of barbed-wire fences made life
for
wild horses than before.
2. During the
period, the population of horses fell below
17,000.
3. Hunger and thirst were the
threats to horses.
4. Seeing wild horses in fenced feedlots made Dayton Hyde feel
than he had for a long time.
5. The ranch was no
than the feedlot.
6. The thought of the horses breaking down the fence was Dayton’s
fear.
7. Conditions were
for horses after more land was
settled.
8. The cold felt
for the cowboys than it did for the
horses.
9. This is the
time to ride a horse.
10. My saddle sore is no
than yours, I suppose.
11. That’s not the
riding I’ve ever seen.
12. That trail is much
than this trail.
Wild Horses • Grade 4/ Unit 5
154
At Home: Ask your child and a family member to write four
sentences, two with worse and two with worst.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
Use better to compare two people, places, or things.
Use best to compare more than two.
Use worse to compare two people, places, or things.
Use worst to compare more than two.
Do not use more, most, -er, or -est with better, best, worse,
or worst.
Read the sentences below. Look for comparisons that use forms
of good and bad incorrectly. Rewrite the sentences correctly.
1. Angie is best at taking care of horses than I am.
2. Justin is the most best rider I know.
3. The drought grew worser when it didn’t rain all summer.
4. That was the most worst day he ever had.
5. Her limp is getting badder.
6. What food is bestest for horses?
7. Their health will be more betterer if you give them vitamins.
8. Troublemaker’s behavior was the worstest of all the horses.
Wild Horses • Grade 4/ Unit 5
155
At Home: Have your child write three sentences about the
story, using the forms of good and bad to make comparisons.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Proofreading
Rewrite each sentence in the scientific observation below.
Remember to use forms of good and bad correctly.
QUESTION: What is the bestest way to approach a horse?
OBSERVATIONS: Calm horses have relaxed muscles, heads, and necks.
Frightened horses may raise their heads and tense their muscles. Flattened
ears are one of the most worst signs of fear.
Alan and Maria approached the horse named Bertha. The trainer, Marcos,
was with them. (It is always goodest to have adults present for safety.) When
Alan walked loudly toward Bertha from behind, her signs of fear grew worser.
When Maria walked slowly and quietly toward Bertha from the left front side,
Bertha stayed more calmer. She seemed to like this approach much more better.
CONCLUSION: Approaching a horse from the front or side is gooder than
approaching from behind.
Wild Horses • Grade 4/ Unit 5
156
At Home: Have your child read an article in a science
magazine and circle each use of better, best, worse, and worst.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Comparing with
Good and Bad
A. Read each sentence. Write yes if the underlined adjective is
the correct form of good. Write no if it is not correct.
1. I think the Black Hills Sanctuary would be the better place in the world to
work.
2. This stall is better than that one.
3. Summer is the best of all seasons.
4. I remember this story the better of all.
5. Yuskeya is a best runner than Funny Face is.
6. This horse farm is the better of them.
7. My saddle is better than yours.
8. This view is best than the other one.
B. Read each sentence. Decide if the missing adjective is worse
or worst. Write it on the line.
9. Chocolate is one of the
foods you could give to pets.
10. Chocolate is much
for animals than it is for humans.
11. My horse felt
last week than he does this week.
12. This is the
fence I have seen in my life.
13. Last year’s weather was bad, but this year’s weather is
.
14. This trail is the
one I’ve seen.
15. Yuskeya’s left hoof is in
shape than the others.
16. My feet feel the
in these awful boots.
Wild Horses • Grade 4/ Unit 5
157
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Review: Comparing
with Good and Bad
Use better to compare two people, places, or things.
Use best to compare more than two.
Use worse to compare two people, places, or things.
Use worst to compare more than two.
Mechanics
Do not use more, most, -er, or -est with better, best, worse,
or worst.
Read the sentences about the picture. Correct the adjectives
that are not written correctly.
1. What is the bestest place for animals to live?
2. Would it be best for a horse to live on a farm or to run wild?
3. What would be the worse part of living on a farm?
4. What might make running wild the worst of the two choices?
Wild Horses • Grade 4/ Unit 5
158
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Unit Review:
Adjectives
Read each passage and look at the underlined sentences. Is there a
mistake? If there is, how do you correct it? Circle your answer.
(1) My dog Brownie is a german shepherd. He looks strong and a little
scary. (2) However, Brownie is actually very gentle. Anyone is safe with him.
1. A. Add capitalization.
B. Add punctuation.
C. Use a better adjective.
D. No mistake.
2. E. Add capitalization.
F. Add punctuation.
G. Use a better adjective.
H. No mistake.
(3) Félipé, the spanish viceroy’s son, was rude to Ranita. He thought she
was only a frog. (4) He didn’t know a woman had put a spell on her. She was
really an emperor’s daughter.
3. A. Add capitalization.
B. Add punctuation.
C. Change the article.
D. No mistake.
4. E. Add capitalization.
F. Add punctuation.
G. Change the article.
H. No mistake.
Unit Review • Grade 4/ Unit 5
159
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Unit Review:
Adjectives
(5) I think collages are hard to make than paintings. You need to  nd all
sorts of different materials to use. Sometimes  nding the right materials is
a matter of luck. (6) To me, that’s also what makes collages interesting than
paintings.
5. A. Adjective needs an ending.
B. Adjective needs more.
C. Adjective needs most.
D. No mistake.
6. E. Adjective needs an ending.
F. Adjective needs more.
G. Adjective needs most.
H. No mistake.
Animals face many challenges living in the wild. (7) Still, some animals
like living in the wild best than living as pets or on a farm. For example,
dogs and cats like living as pets in people’s homes. (8) But wild horses seem
to think that’s much worse than dogs and cats do.
7. A. Add punctuation.
B. Change use of better or best.
C. Change use of worse or worst.
D. No mistake.
8. E. Add punctuation.
F. Change use of better or best.
G. Change use of worse or worst.
H. No mistake.
Unit Review • Grade 4/ Unit 5
160
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Adjectives and adverbs should not be confused.
An adjective describes nouns. It gives information about a
person, place, or thing.
An adverb tells more about the verb, such as how, when,
and where an action takes place.
Read each sentence and look at the underlined word. Then tell if
the word is an adjective or an adverb.
1. In 1848, many people quickly moved to California in search of gold.
2. The forty-niners hoped to become rich men.
3. I like to read interesting stories about the California Gold Rush.
4. Show your father the treasure map that you found yesterday.
5. The miner dug deeply into the hole to see if there was gold inside.
6. I do not think that what you found in the river is real gold.
7. On our  eld trip to the gold mine, our guide led us through a dark tunnel.
8. Matt and Eric were standing by a muddy road.
9. Raven always wanted to travel back in time to see how her
neighborhood used to look.
10. They eagerly waited to join the wagon train to California.
Adjectives
vs. Adverbs
The Gold Rush Game • Grade 4/ Unit 6
161
At Home: Have your child rewrite three of the above
sentences, replacing the underlined adjective or adverb with
another of his or her choosing.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
An adverb is a word that tells more about a verb.
Some adverbs tell how an action takes place.
Some adverbs tell when an action takes place.
Some adverbs tell where an action takes place.
Underline the adverb in each sentence. Then write if the adverb
tells how, when, or where the action takes place.
1. My mother and I went to the library together for information about our
ancestors.
2. Many Native Americans lived freely on this land.
3. Tomorrow we will visit our local museum of natural history.
4. Were they traveling far in search of gold?
5. Did James Marshall  rst  nd gold at Sutter’s Mill?
6. John Sutter, Jr. built a new city nearby along the Sacramento River.
7. We patiently sifted the sand for gold.
8. Our uncle examined the rock carefully.
9. He carelessly threw the stone back in the water.
10. That greedy miner looked at them suspiciously.
11. We quickly ran down the path.
12. We then found the gold.
Adverbs
The Gold Rush Game • Grade 4/ Unit 6
162
At Home: Have your child write three sentences, one with a
word that tells how, one with a word that tells when, and one
with a word that tells where.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Good is an adjective and is used to describe nouns.
Well is an adverb that tells how about a verb.
Do not confuse the adjective good with the adverb well.
Use well as an adjective when you refer to someone’s health.
Complete each sentence by writing the word good or well on the line.
1. Today our team did
in the class treasure-hunt game.
2. Our teacher hid the treasure pieces so
that they
were very hard to  nd.
3. The other team also did
, but we found the pieces
faster than they did.
4. Though I didn’t feel
, I helped  nd the last, hidden
treasure piece.
5. It was a
experience to win the game for a second
year.
6. This river is a
place to look for gold pieces.
7. Grandfather, would it be a
idea to look for gold in
the river?
8. If we pan for gold all day and night, we should do
.
9. We can have a
time swimming in the water if we do
not  nd anything.
10. Is your father feeling
enough to come with us?
Mechanics
The Gold Rush Game • Grade 4/ Unit 6
163
At Home: Have your child write two sentences that tell
things that are good and two sentences that tell something
that he or she did well.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
An adverb is a word that tells more about a verb.
Some adverbs tell how an action takes place.
Most adverbs that tell how end in -ly. They are formed by
adding -ly to an adjective.
Read the magazine article below and circle the six incorrect
adverbs. Then write the words correctly on the lines below.
When the gold miners of 1849 were looking for gold, they frequent found
shiny stones in their pans. However, not all were true gold. Fool’s gold, also
called pyrite, is a stone that some miners mistaken confused with the real
thing. What if you ever  nd a rock that looks like gold? These three ways
can quick help you  nd out if it is real gold or fool’s gold.
First, look careful at the color. Both are shiny and yellow-colored, but
real gold also has a silver tone. The color of fool’s gold is more like brass.
Next, look at the shape. Fool’s gold usual forms cubes and larger shapes.
Real gold comes in chunks,  akes, or sheets. Last, brisk rub it against
another hard object and smell it. Gold has no smell, but fool’s gold will
smell a little like rotten eggs. Maybe that’s why they call it fool’s gold!
1. 3. 5.
2. 4. 6.
Rewrite the above article with the correct adverbs on the lines
provided.
Proofreading
The Gold Rush Game • Grade 4/ Unit 6
164
At Home: Have your child tell you three things that he or she
did skillfully. Have him or her use the word skillfully in the
response.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Read each sentence. Then using the clue in the parentheses,
circle the letter of the correct adverb that completes each
sentence.
1. After gold was discovered at Sutter’s Mill, many people moved
.
(where?)
a. there c. brie y
b. well d. quietly
2. Her grandfather traveled
to California to search for gold. (how?)
a. today c. bravely
b. outside d. ahead
3. Her grandfather shouted
when he saw a piece of gold in the
river. (how?)
a. well c. around
b. next d. gleefully
4. His shouting was so loud, it could be heard near and
. (where?)
a. far c. soon
b. rst d. silent
5. People
came from everywhere to see why her grandfather was
shouting. (when?)
a. forcefully c. eagerly
b. wisely d. quickly
6. he realized that it was just a piece of fool’s gold. (when?)
a. Unhappily c. Then
b. Excitedly d. Nearly
Test: Adverbs
The Gold Rush Game • Grade 4/ Unit 6
165
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
An adverb is a word that tells more about a verb.
Some adverbs tell how an action takes place.
Most adverbs that tell how end in -ly. They are formed by
adding -ly to an adjective.
Read each sentence below. Then write the correct form of the
underlined word on the line.
1. The river rapid washes mud and sand into their pans.
2. They brief stop to check if any gold is inside.
3. Looking for gold, they cautious swirl the pans around.
4. The men must hold their pans careful so they do not fall into the water.
5. They talked hopeful about  nding many pieces of gold.
Mechanics
Good is an adjective and is used to describe nouns.
Well is an adverb that tells how about a verb.
Use well as an adjective when you refer to someone’s health.
Do not confuse the adjective good with the adverb well.
Review: Adverbs
The Gold Rush Game • Grade 4/ Unit 6
166
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
An adverb can compare two or more actions.
Add -er to short adverbs to compare two actions.
Add -est to short adverbs to compare more than two actions.
Add -er or -est to each boldfaced adverb to complete the
sentences below. Remember to drop the final e or change y to i
when necessary before adding -er or -est.
1. fast In the country, I walk the
of all.
2. slow When I get tired, I move
than my brother.
3. hard These builders worked
than the others to
nish on time.
4. high We will climb
than the  rst team to reach
the top of the hill.
5. low Birds  y
over the city than they do here.
6. tall The mountains here rise
than city
buildings.
7. close We live
to the river than you do.
8. late We sleep
in the city than we do here.
9. early We rise
in the mountains than in the city.
10. long The sunsets here last
of all.
Adverbs
That Compare
The Cricket in Times Square
Grade 4/ Unit 6
167
At Home: Have your child rewrite three of the above
sentences, replacing the underlined word with another one.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Use more or most to form comparisons with adverbs that end
in -ly or with longer adverbs.
Use more to compare two actions.
Use most to compare more than two actions.
When you use more or most, do not use the ending -er or -est.
Use more or most with the underlined adverb in each first
sentence to complete the two sentences that follow.
1. The train that Chester was on shook harshly as it moved on the track.
The second train shook
every now and then.
But the subway car shook
of all.
2. Chester furiously tried to escape from the picnic basket.
He tried
as the train rattled and shook.
Chester tried the
of all when they  nally reached
New York.
3. Harry Cat speedily jumped toward Chester and Tucker Mouse.
Chester jumped the
of all into the matchbox.
Chester jumped
than Harry Cat.
4. Chester chirps sweetly when he is excited.
Chester chirps
when he is scared.
But Chester chirps the
when he is happy.
5. Chester moves hastily through the drain pipe.
Harry Cat moves
through the drain pipe.
But Tucker moves the
of all through the drain
pipe.
Adverbs
That Compare
The Cricket in Times Square
Grade 4/ Unit 6
168
At Home: Have your child look in magazine articles to fi nd
examples of comparative adverbs formed with more or most.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
An adverb can compare two or more actions.
Add -er to short adverbs to compare two actions.
Add -est to short adverbs to compare more than two actions.
Use more or most to form comparisons with adverbs that end
in -ly or with longer adverbs.
Use more to compare two actions.
Use most to compare more than two actions.
When you use more or most, do not use the ending -er or -est.
Add more or most to the beginning of each boldfaced adverb to
complete the sentences below.
1. easily Tucker Mouse moves through the city
than Chester.
2. clumsily Of the three friends, Chester runs the
through Times Square.
3. terribly Times Square upset Chester
than
he had imagined.
4. kindly Harry Cat treats mice and crickets
than other cats do.
5. politely City cats behave
than country cats.
6. speedily Chester thought that Harry ran the
of all.
7. widely Chester opened his eyes
as he
got used to the lights.
8. dazzlingly Of all the lights in the sky, there was one star that shone
the
.
Mechanics
The Cricket in Times Square
Grade 4/ Unit 6
169
At Home: Have your child write three sentences about a trip that
include examples of words that compare with more or most.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Read the magazine article below and circle the six incorrect adverbs.
In a nest near school, a baby bird chirped loud than a grown bird. It sad
seems that the bird got lost when its family went south. The bird was not
used to the cold weather, so it hid inside the nest. Then a young boy and his
uncle heard it chirping frantic in the tree.
They took the baby bird to the animal hospital. The doctor there kind
offered to take the bird to the zoo. At the zoo, the workers are feeding it
more careful. It is feeling much better now. As soon as it gets completely
well, the zoo will send it south to be with other birds. It will live safe in a
warm climate than a cold one.
Rewrite the above article with the correct adverbs on the lines
below.
Proofreading
The Cricket in Times Square
Grade 4/ Unit 6
170
At Home: Have your child write about a sick animal that he
or she has helped nurse back to health.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Test: Adverbs
That Compare
A. For each of the adverbs below, write the form you would use
to compare two things. Then choose one of the adverbs you
formed and use it in a sentence.
1. close
2. curiously
3. carefully
4. soon
5. gloomily
6. tall
7. loudly
8.
B. For each of the following adverbs, write the form you would
use to compare more than two things. Then choose one of
the adverbs you formed and use it in a sentence.
9. graciously
10. playfully
11. straight
12. heavily
13. hard
14. sweetly
15. sadly
16.
The Cricket in Times Square
Grade 4/ Unit 6
171
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Add -er to short adverbs to compare two actions.
Add -est to short adverbs to compare more than two actions.
Use more to compare two actions with longer adverbs.
Use most to compare more than two actions with longer adverbs.
Add comparative adverbs to complete the sentences below.
1. The trains run
on weekends than during the
week.
2. Tucker got hungry
than the others.
3. Tucker told his story
when Chester was listening.
4. Subway trains screech
than regular trains.
5. Of the three friends, Tucker moved
through the
drain pipe.
6. He unpacked the picnic basket
than Chester.
7. Tucker shook his head
than Chester.
8. On New Year’s Eve, the city lights shine
than
on other nights.
9. Harry Cat grew
than the rest of them.
10. Now people helped him
than they had before.
11. Some acted
than others.
12. The siren blared
of all.
Name
Review: Adverbs
That Compare
The Cricket in Times Square
Grade 4/ Unit 6
172
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
A negative is a word that means “no,” such as not, never,
nobody, nowhere, and contractions with n’t.
Do not use two negatives in the same sentence.
You can fix a sentence with two negatives by removing one.
Correct each sentence by removing one of the negatives. Then
rewrite the sentence.
1. Imagine if we didn’t never know about dinosaurs.
2. What if there wasn’t no place you could go to see their bones?
3. Maybe you never thought nothing about it.
4. A long time ago, people weren’t never interested in studying dinosaurs.
5. There wasn’t no effort made to keep bones and other items that were
found.
6. We didn’t never have a way to know how these animals lived.
7. There weren’t never museums like there are today.
8. Years ago, there wasn’t no one who wanted to search for dinosaurs.
Negatives
Meet a Bone-ifi ed Explorer
Grade 4/ Unit 6
173
At Home: Have your child listen carefully to TV shows for
examples of two negatives like the ones in this lesson.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
You can correct a sentence with two negatives by changing
one negative to a positive word.
no—any nothing—anything no one—anyone
never—ever nobody—anybody nowhere—anywhere
Correct these sentences by changing one negative word to a
positive word.
1. Hakeem never wanted nothing to do with science.
2. He didn’t like to be nowhere near dirt and bones.
3. His teacher thought he wouldn’t never pass her class.
4. There wasn’t nobody who disliked science more than he did.
5. Hakeem hadn’t never seen anything like that piece of amber.
6. Now there isn’t no class more fun than science.
7. Hakeem isn’t never late for class anymore.
8. There isn’t no better way to thank her for what she did.
Negatives
Meet a Bone-ifi ed Explorer
Grade 4/ Unit 6
174
At Home: Ask your child to write a short paragraph about a
trip to a natural history museum or exhibit. Encourage your
child to check his or her work for double negatives.
© Macmillan/McGraw-Hill
Grammar
Name
Mechanics
Do not use two negatives in the same sentence.
You can fix a sentence with two negatives by removing one.
You can correct a sentence with two negatives by changing
one negative to a positive word.
Rewrite each sentence below by dropping a negative or
changing one negative to a positive word.
1. I haven’t found nothing in this area yet.
2. Our team didn’t waste no time  nding the skeleton.
3. Don’t never go out in the bright sun without putting on a hat.
4. There isn’t no place to  nd dinosaur bones here.
5. I wouldn’t never want to see a dinosaur in real life.
6. Doesn’t no one know about the oldest fossil ever found?
7. The team couldn’t  nd the sunken ship nowhere.
8. Iris didn’t put no labels on the stones she found.
Meet a Bone-ifi ed Explorer