simplebooklet thumbnail

How you can help your child at home

of 0
Byron Primary/Intermediate Language Arts
Curriculum Guide for Parents
Preschool - Grade 5
Byron Independent School District No. 53
Contents:
General Information:.............................................................................................................................2
Portrait of Students who are College and Career Ready………..……………...…………………........3
Pre-K/School Readiness.......................................................................................................................4
Kindergarten .........................................................................................................................................5
Grade 1...................................................................................................................................................6
Grade 2...................................................................................................................................................7
Grade 3...................................................................................................................................................8
Grade 4...................................................................................................................................................9
Grade 5..................................................................................................................................................10
Using Data to Guide Instruction in Byron Primary/Intermediate Schools…………………………..12
The A B C's of Strategic Reading/Comprehension Questioning for Parents…………………...13-17
2
General Information
In Minnesota, the Language Arts content standards, aligned with the National Common Core standards are divided
into four separate strands: Reading, Writing, Speaking/Viewing/ Listening and Media Literacy, and Language.
Students receive instruction in each area and standard, every year. The content builds on itself and becomes more
in-depth as students progress through the years.
A comprehensive Language Arts program provides meaningful instruction in the four core areas. All E-8 Byron Primary/Intermediate
schools strive to use a Balanced Literacy/Workshop Structure for instructional planning and implementation. Observation and
assessment data are used on a daily basis to make instructional decisions. The daily delivery of instruction moves through each of
the components of a Workshop Model: read aloud, whole group lesson, small group guided instruction, and independent practice.
It’s this structure that allows us to personalize instruction and meet the needs of all students in Byron.
One of the most important guiding principles in the Byron Primary/Intermediate schools is that we believe students should be
spending at least 30 minutes per day reading at home and should be accountable for a specified number of books read per year.
The more students read, the more words they encounter and the more vocabulary and background knowledge they gain. Please
help find some time for your child to read at home and talk about text, whether these are books that have come from school or
books you have at home. Take a look at how beneficial time spent reading can be for your child:
What Matters: Variation in Amount of Independent Reading
Student
percentile rank
Minutes of reading per day
Words read per year
98
65.0
4,358,000
80
14.2
1,146,000
60
6.5
432,000
40
3.2
200,000
2
0
0
Anderson, Richard C., Wilson, P.T Fielding, L.G., “Growth in Reading How Children Spend Their Time Outside of School,”
Reading Research Quarterly #23, pp.285-303 1988
In an effort to communicate some of the essential learning at each of the grade levels, we have created this Elementary Language
Arts Curriculum Guide for Parents. The following pages outline some basic information regarding Elementary Language Arts. This
knowledge is only a part of the expectations for elementary students in Byron Primary/Intermediate schools; we attempted to
identify skills and strategies that may offer support for parents and their children. For a more complete curriculum outline, feel free
to view our curriculum webpage or contact Donita Stepan, Director of Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment for Byron Public
Schools at donita.stepan@byron.k12.mn.u
3
A Portrait of Students Who are College and Career Ready in Reading, Writing, Speaking,
Viewing, Listening, and Media Literacy and Language
The descriptions that follow are not standards themselves but instead offer a portrait of students who meet the
standards set out by the state of Minnesota. As students advance through the grades and master the standards in
reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and media literacy and language, they are able to exhibit with increasing
fullness and regularity these capacities of the literate individual.
They demonstrate independence.
Students can, without significant scaffolding, comprehend and evaluate complex texts across a range of types and disciplines, and
they can construct effective arguments and convey intricate or multifaceted information. Likewise, students are able independently
to discern a speaker’s key points, request clarification, and ask relevant questions. They build on others’ ideas, articulate their own
ideas, and confirm they have been understood. Without prompting, they demonstrate command of Standard English and acquire
and use a wide-ranging vocabulary. More broadly, they become self-directed learners, effectively seeking out and using resources
to assist them, including teachers, peers, and print and digital reference materials.
They build strong content knowledge.
Students establish a base of knowledge across a wide range of subject matter by engaging with works of quality and substance.
They become proficient in new areas through research and study. They read purposefully and listen attentively to gain both general
knowledge and discipline-specific expertise. They refine and share their knowledge through writing and speaking.
They respond to the varying demands of audience, task, purpose, and discipline.
Students adapt their communication in relation to audience, task, purpose, and discipline. They set and adjust purpose for reading,
writing, speaking, listening, and language use as warranted by the task. They appreciate nuances, such as how the composition of
an audience should affect tone when speaking and how the connotations of words affect meaning. They also know that different
disciplines call for different types of evidence (e.g., documentary evidence in history, experimental evidence in science).
They comprehend as well as critique.
Students are engaged and open-minded—but discerning— readers, listeners and viewers. They work diligently to understand
precisely what an author or speaker is saying, but they also question an author’s or speaker’s assumptions and premises and
assess the veracity of claims and the soundness of reasoning.
They value evidence.
Students cite specific evidence when offering an oral or written interpretation of a text. They use relevant evidence when supporting
their own points in writing and speaking, making their reasoning clear to the reader or listener, and they constructively evaluate
others’ use of evidence.
They use technology and digital media strategically and capably.
Students employ technology thoughtfully to enhance their reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and media literacy and
language use. They tailor their searches online to acquire useful information efficiently, and they integrate what they learn using
technology with what they learn offline. They are familiar with the strengths and limitations of various technological tools and
mediums and can select and use those best suited to their communication goals.
They come to understand other perspectives and cultures.
Students appreciate that the twenty-first-century classroom and workplace are settings in which people from often widely divergent
cultures and who represent diverse experiences and perspectives must learn and work together. Students actively seek to
understand other perspectives and cultures through reading and listening, and they are able to communicate effectively with people
of varied backgrounds. They evaluate other points of view critically and constructively. Through reading great classic and
contemporary works of literature representative of a variety of periods, cultures, and worldviews, students can vicariously inhabit
worlds and have experiences much different than their own.
4
Essential Learnings by Grade Level (Critical ELO’s)
The next several pages outline the essential learnings and some key knowledge that is required at each of the grade
levels. This is only a fraction of the expectations for students in Byron Primary/Intermediate schools. For a more complete
curriculum outline, feel free to view our curriculum webpage or contact Donita Stepan, Byron Director of Curriculum, Instruction and
Assessment at donita.stepan@byron.k12.mn.us
Pre-K/School Readiness
Early Literacy Development includes listening, speaking, emergent reading and emergent writing. The Early Childhood Indicators of
Progress: Minnesota's Early Learning Standards are the basis for literacy standards and benchmarks in the Pre-K/School Readiness
Program. The Early Learning Standards and benchmarks are aligned with the district Kindergarten standards to promote a smooth
transition and build depth of knowledge and promote skills necessary for future school success.
How can you help your child at home?
Listening Take time each day to listen to your child and notice and respond to what he/she says
and does. Talk with your child using language appropriate to their level of understanding Use mealtimes and
other daily routines as an opportunity for conversation Use rhymes and songs with your child
Speaking Talk with your child in your home language and encourage them to use language and
respond to you Give your child the time he or she needs to respond to you Be sure your child has opportunities
to talk with other adults and children When reading to your child encourage him/her to talk about the story and
share their ideas
Reading Read to your child often Point out the pictures and words in the book when reading to
your child Ask your child questions when reading and encourage them to guess what will happen next in a book
Writing Provide writing materials like a variety of paper and pencils, markers and crayons. Support your
child’s scribble and pretend writing Help your child to recognize the letters in their name and practice writing
letters.
5
Kindergarten
Your child will be exposed to many different learning experiences in Kindergarten. These experiences will be appropriate to your
child’s age and level of development and will be presented in a variety of ways in order to introduce, reinforce, extend or master
the skills.
How can you help at home?
Along with the benchmarks from the State of Minnesota and the Byron District Critical ELO’s, Kindergarten students, by the
end of the school year, will:
Recognize all 26 uppercase and lowercase letters
Recognize all 26 uppercase and lowercase sounds
Recognize the following sight words by the end of the year: a, and, he, I ,in, is, it, of, that, the, to , was, as, at, be, are, for,
have, his, on, they, we, with, you, this, my come, here, go like, am, see, up, look, me, said, when, she will, her, does
Write and spell the following sight words by the end of the year: a, and, he, I ,in, is ,it, the, to , at, be, go, like, am, see, up,
me, she, will, on
Recognize and pronounce the following digraphs by the end of the year: sh, wh, th, ch, qu
Read and discuss 50+ books with a parent by the end of the year
Write at least one formal piece each trimester – narrative, informative and opinion– along with daily journaling
Read, alone or with a parent, at least 30 minutes per night
6
Grade 1
Your child will be exposed to many different learning experiences in first grade. These experiences will be appropriate to
your child’s age and level of development and will be presented in a variety of ways in order to introduce, reinforce, extend
or master the skills.
How can you help at home?
Along with the benchmarks from the State of Minnesota and the Byron District Critical ELO’s, first grade students, by the
end of the school year, will:
Read and discuss 50+ books with a parent/teacher by the end of the year
Write at least one process paper each trimester – narrative, informative and opinion – Review your child’s
writing.
Read, alone or with a parent, at least 30 minutes per night
Recognize the following site words automatically:
7
Grade 2
Your child will be exposed to many different learning experiences in second grade. These experiences will be appropriate to
your child’s age and level of development and will be presented in a variety of ways in order to introduce, reinforce, extend
or master the skills.
How can you help your child at home?
Along with the benchmarks from the State of Minnesota and the Byron District Critical ELO’s, second grade students, by
the end of the school year, will:
Read and discuss 25+ books with a parent/teacher by the end of the year
Write at least one process paper each trimester – narrative, informative and opinion – Review your child’s
writing.
Read, alone or with a parent, at least 30 minutes per night
Recognize the following site words automatically:
8
Grade 3
Your child will be exposed to many different learning experiences in third grade. These experiences will be
appropriate to your child’s age and level of development and will be presented in a variety of ways in order to
introduce, reinforce, extend or master the skills.
How can you help your child at home?
Along with the benchmarks from the State of Minnesota and the Byron District Critical ELO’s, third grade students, by the
end of the school year, will: :
Read and discuss 25+ books with a parent/teacher by the end of the year
Write at least one process paper each trimester – narrative, informative and opinion – Review
writing with a parent.
Read, alone or with a parent, at least 30 minutes per night
Recognize and define the following root words, prefixes and suffixes:
9
Grade 4
Your child will be exposed to many different learning experiences in fourth grade. These experiences will be
appropriate to your child’s age and level of development and will be presented in a variety of ways in order to
introduce, reinforce, extend or master the skills.
How can you help your child at home?
Along with the benchmarks from the State of Minnesota and the Byron District Critical ELO’s, fourth grade students, by the
end of the school year, will:
Read and discuss 25+ books with a parent/teacher by the end of the year
Write at least one process paper each trimester – narrative, informative and opinion – Review writing with a
parent
Read, alone or with a parent, at least 30 minutes per night
Recognize and define the following root words, prefixes and suffixes
10
Grade 5
Your child will be exposed to many different learning experiences in fifth grade. These
experiences will be appropriate to your child’s age and level of development and will be presented
in a variety of ways in order to introduce, reinforce, extend or master the skills.
How can you help your child at home?
Along with the benchmarks from the State of Minnesota and the Byron District Critical ELO’s, fifth grade students, by the
end of the school year, will:
Read and discuss 25+ books with a parent/teacher by the end of the year
Write at least one process paper each trimester – narrative, informative and persuasive – Review
writing with a parent.
Read, alone or with a parent, at least 30 minutes per night
Recognize and define the following root words, prefixes and suffixes
11
Using Data to Guide Instruction Byron
Primary/Intermediate Schools
Research tells us that a child’s teacher is the single most important factor in student learning. One thing that
great teachers do is support student learning by collecting and using various forms of data collected in the
classroom. Our expectation in Byron Primary/Intermediate schools is that all teachers use data to guide their
instructional decisions on a daily basis.
The data that is collected is used in several ways. Teachers use it to guide their instruction and to help them
plan appropriate instruction, intervention, and enrichment for the students in their classroom; principals use
data collected at the building level to determine instructional programming necessary at the building level;
districts use the data collected to track all students, district wide, and determine district and school progress
being made over time. This leads to high quality instructional programming across the district.
An effective assessment plan has four main objectives:
Identify students who are at risk, on an ongoing basis, and who may need extra instruction or
intensive interventions if they are to progress toward grade-level by the end of the school year
(screening).
Inform instructional planning in order to meet the specific needs of individual students (diagnosis).
Monitor students’ progress during the year to determine whether students in intervention are
making adequate progress in literacy development (progress monitoring).
Evaluate the effectiveness of interventions and whether the instruction provided is intensive enough
to help students achieve grade-level standards by the end of each year (evaluation).
A guidelines chart was created so teachers have easy access to our Byron Primary/Intermediate schools
data guidelines. There are essentially two different types of data - quantitative data and qualitative data. The
quantitative data that we have included as part of our assessment system has a direct correlation to
comprehension over time. You will see this quantitative data outlined in our Reading Data Guidelines Chart.
In addition to the quantitative data, teachers continue to consider the qualitative data that has been collected
throughout the year as well – things like anecdotal records of behavior, checklists, class participation, etc.
Both quantitative and qualitative data are equally important as we make instructional decisions for our
students.
This Reading Data Guidelines Chart is divided by grade levels and is used by teachers to help them identify
students who are either falling behind and need intervention or who are advancing and need enrichment.
These data guidelines are precursors that directly relate to reading proficiency.
It’s important for our families to understand that we use these numbers as GUIDELINES ONLY. A range of
indicators is much more beneficial than looking at only one number. The Reading Data Guidelines Chart is a
culmination of the district wide reading assessments given across the district and the benchmark scores we
are striving for with your child. If you have received assessment scores from your teacher, and you have
questions, we strongly encourage you to contact your child’s teacher for clarification. Remember that
reading is about making meaning from text. Helping your child with the meaning of text is the best way for
you to help your child at home.
12
The A, B, C’s of Reading Comprehension
Read…Read… Read…. Think and Question
Reading is more than saying the words on a page or getting your child from the beginning of the book to the end. To
be successful readers, children need to comprehend (understand) what they read. This is ultimately what
matters!
There is plenty of thinking that never contributes to any understanding and never casts light on what’s really
important. Thinking without questioning will never get a reader to true understanding. We must work together to
ensure our students learn to question, wonder and think. Asking some of the questions below, and asking them to
provide EVIDENCE of their thinking, will help your child learn to think and comprehend.
Visualizing
Readers create pictures in their minds as they read. If they aren’t able to, comprehension is lost. Perhaps background
knowledge isn’t solid enough for the child to understand the text or perhaps he or she needs to reread for
understanding. You could have your children make stops while reading aloud to describe the pictures in their minds.
They could even draw for you what they see. You could also ask them questions…
What do you picture as you read this paragraph?
When reading this story did you make pictures in your head?
How did these pictures help you understand the story better?
Questioning
When readers question the text before, during, and after they read, they attend more closely to the text, clarify
meaning, make predictions, and focus their attention on what’s important. It is important for readers to understand
some of the most interesting questions we have aren’t always answered in the story!
Before Reading
What do you think will happen?
Why do you suppose...
During Reading
What do you think...
What do you wonder...
How come...
What does that word mean?
How can I figure it out using clues from the text
After Reading
What would have happened if…
I wonder why the author…
I wonder where we could look to find out more about…
13
Making Connections
Readers constantly make connections as they read; connections to their own lives, another book, or real world
events. Bringing those connections out and discussing them can lead to more interaction and interest in a text as well
as deepen comprehension.
What does this book remind you of?
Have you experienced any of the events or situations in this book?
Can you understand how the character was feeling? Why?
What do you know about the book’s topic?
Does this book remind you of another book?
Inferring
More than simple prediction, inferring happens when readers can take what they know and what is written in the book
to read between the lines. The ability to infer helps the reader get to the why of the story and draw conclusions. You
can help your child use inference by asking…
Why did you think that would happen?
Why did the author write the story in that way?
Why do you think the character feels that way?
Why did the character do that?
Determining Importance
Readers need to prioritize as they read. It is related to main idea and identifying themes. It is a critical skill for
students as they encounter textbooks and nonfiction. Be sure your child pays attention to first and last lines of a
paragraph, titles, heading, captions, fonts, illustrations, italics, and bold faced print. Initiate discussion before reading
by asking what your child knows about the topic and what he or she would like to learn.
What kind of message is the author sending?
What are the main ideas?
What is just interesting without being important?
SIMILARITIES/DIFFERENCES
Ask yourself questions which require you to find similarities and differences in characters, settings, and events
presented in various texts.
How are ________ and ___________ ALIKE?
How is ______________ DIFFERENT from ___________?
How is ____________ both SIMILAR to and DIFFERENT from _______________?
What is one DIFFERENCE between ___________ and ____________?
How is ________________ dissimilar to ___________?
How did the character change from the beginning of the story until the end?
14
CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER
Ask yourself questions which require you to use skill of sequencing in order to form an answer. Be sure you are able
to prove your answer by showing pages, pictures, etc… within the story (text).
What happened just BEFORE _____?
What happened just AFTER______?
What happened first, last, etc…?
What happened between ______ and _______?
What is the first, second, third, last, etc… step in_______?
PROBLEM/SOLUTION
Ask yourself questions which require you to identify the problem and solution in the story (text). Make sure you
support your answer with facts and details from the story (text).
What was the problem in the story?
How was the problem solved?
COMPARE & CONTRAST
Ask yourself questions which require you to recognize the use of comparison and contrast in story (text). Make sure
you support your examples with facts and details from the story (text).
How are ______ and _______ALIKE?
How is ____ DIFFERENT from ____?
How are you SIMILAR to the character(s)?
How are you DIFFERENT from the character(s)?
What is one DIFFERENCE between ____ and ____?
CAUSE & EFFECT
Ask yourself questions which require you to describe the cause or effect of an action or event within the story (text).
Make sure you prove your answers using facts and details from the story (text).
What caused _____ to _____?
What happened because of _____?
What effect did _____ have on _____?
What might happen if _____?
What is the effect of _____?
Why did the character ______?
What were the results of _____?
15
MAIN IDEA
Ask yourself questions which require you to find the main idea of a story (text). Make sure you support your answer
using facts and details from the story (text).
What is the main idea of the story?
Describe what the story is mostly about in 10 words or less.
Would ________ be a good title for the story? Why?
What do you think would be another good title for the story? Why?
RETELLING
Ask yourself to retell a part of the story (text). Make sure you retell the story with the proper story elements.
Remember to use specific information from the text. Do NOT make up information.
Retell the part of the story from ______ to ________;
Retell your favorite part of the story.
In your own words, what happened in the beginning, middle, or end of the story?
PLOT DEVELOPMENT/RESOLUTION
Ask yourself questions which require you to identify plot development and/or problem resolution in the story.
What problem did the character face?
What happens that causes the character to change from the beginning to the end of the story?
How is the problem solved in the story?
What events lead to the resolution of the problem in the story?
*Remember to support your answers using details from the text.
AUTHOR’S PURPOSE
Ask yourself questions which require you to recognize why the author wrote the story (text). Make sure you can justify
your answers.
Why do you think the author wrote the story, article, etc…?
Is the author trying to explain or show you how to do something?
Is the author trying to entertain you or make you feel happy?
Is the author trying to make you think like him/her?
Is the author trying to teach you about something?
Examples of Author’s Purpose:
Show, Entertain, Persuade, Inform
16
VOCABULARY
Ask yourself questions which require you to determine the correct meaning of a word in context (within text). Justify
your answers.
What does __________ mean?
What does the word __________ mean?
Can you think of another word that means the same as _________?
Can you think of a word that means the opposite of __________?
What do you think the word means by looking at the clues (pictures, words around the unfamiliar
word)?
FACT/OPINION
Ask yourself questions which require you to differentiate between fact and opinion in story (text).
Is _____ a fact/opinion from the story? Why?
Tell me one fact/opinion from the story?
Tell me one fact/opinion about you?
*Remember: a fact is something one can prove (colors, size, shape, etc..) either right or wrong and an
opinion is someone’s thoughts or feelings (cannot be proven).
FACT/DETAIL
Ask yourself questions which require you to recognize facts and details from the story (text). Make sure you use
specific information from the story (text).
Who? What? Where? When? Why? Which? How?
MULTIPLE REPRESENTATION OF INFORMATION
Ask yourself questions which require you to use a variety of reference materials, including multiple representation of
information such as maps, charts, captions, and pictures to gather information.
According to the maps/charts/captions/ or pictures…
Who? What? Where? When? Why? Which? How?
17
Language Arts Curriculum Guide for Parents 2016
Byron Public Schools;
630 1st Ave NW Byron, MN 55920
| Phone: (507) 775-2383 | Fax: (507) 775-2385
Primary (507) 624-0311 | Intermediate (507) 775-6620 | Middle (507) 775-2189 | High (507) 775-2301
Director of Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment
CONTACT: Donita Stepan
Byron Public Schools
donita.stepan@byron.k12.mn.us
507-624-0356 (work)
507-775-2385 (fax)
18