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FunCation Academy’s 3rd Grade Lesson Plan Sampler
Thank you for trying our Lesson Plan Sampler! Here are a few
quick tips before you begin.
1. This Lesson Plan Sampler contains six (6) 1st grade lessons, Reading, Writing, Spelling, Math, Science, and
Social Studies.
2. Please read through the complete lesson before you begin teaching. (Some lessons require a little prep work
before you can teach).
3. Each lesson includes additional resources, such as an instructional/introduction video, worksheets, and
activities and/or games to enhance the lesson.

3rd

Disclaimer
FunCation Academy is not the original author of any lesson plans. We compiled and modified free online lesson
plans and free additional third-party resources to create homeschool friendly easy-to-use lesson plans. You do
not have to become a member to use our lesson plans, we share 3 lesson plans every month via our newsletter.
Subject
Reading
Title
Author’s Purpose
Lesson Objective
Vocabulary Objectives
• Learn target vocabulary to enhance reading.
• Apply target vocabulary in written responses and oral language.
Comprehension Objectives
• Identify the author’s purpose in writing.
• Make connections between content, wording, and the author’s purpose.
• Recognize similarities in purpose in writings of the same category (advertisements, textbooks, etc.).
Background Information for Teacher
N/A
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
“Author’s Purpose Guide,” Student Page 1
“Decide the Purpose,” Student Page 2
“Guess My Purpose” Level 3, Student Page 5
“Author’s Purpose Guide,” Student Page 1
Paper
Pencil
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1:Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Target Vocabulary Words: unhealthy, action, meals, businesses
When introducing each word, first say the whole word. Next, say the word parts slowly while clapping them. Then say the word
quickly again. Have the student repeat the steps with you. Finally, write the word on the board or chart. Read the definition of each
word to the student and give examples or sample sentences to build meaning.
unhealthy un • healthy (ˈən-ˈhel-thē) Unhealthy means not well or strong. Without sunshine and fresh air, people can become
unhealthy.
action ac • tion ('ak-sh en) Action means moving or doing something. Tim’s favorite movies are always full of fast action.
meals meals ('melz) Meals are food you eat at breakfast, lunch, or supper. After my dinner meals, I like to go for a walk.
business busi •nesses (ˈbiz-nəs-əz) Businesses are companies, stores, or types of work. My grandfather worked in newspaper
businesses all his life.
Have the student write sentences using the Target Vocabulary Words in an ongoing Vocabulary Log. The student should read their
sentences aloud.
Gather together the following items: a fiction book, a history book, a travel magazine, a movie advertisement, and a cookbook.
Each of these texts was written for a different purpose. Write the heading Author’s Purpose
on the board and hold up the
storybook. Why would someone read this book? (for fun) An author’s purpose in writing a story is to entertain readers. Write to
entertain
under the heading Author’s Purpose.
Hold up the history book. Why would someone read this book? (to learn about real people and events) The purpose of history
writers is to share facts about real people and events. When an author gives facts and information about real things, the
purpose is to inform. Add to inform
to the list on the board.
Hold up the travel magazine. This magazine tells what it is like in places where people might take a vacation. When an author
tries to help readers imagine or picture something, the purpose is to describe. Add to describe
to the list on the board.
Hold up the advertisement. What does the author of this ad want readers to do? (go see this movie) When an author wants to
talk readers into doing something, the purpose is to persuade. Add to persuade
to the list on the board.
Hold up the cookbook. Why does an author write a cookbook? (to share recipes for different dishes) When an author tells how
something works or how to do something, the purpose is to explain how. Add to explain
how to the list on the board.
These are five purposes an author may have for writing a text: to entertain, to inform, to describe, to persuade, and to
explain how.
Distribute “Author’s Purpose Guide,” Student Page 1. (Step 3)
Review the five purposes. Have the student write an additional example in the last column.
Let’s practice deciding the author’s purpose.
Distribute “Decide the Purpose,” Student Page 2. (Step 3)
Have the student read aloud the text next to each picture. Guide him/her in identifying and recording the important details of each
paragraph.
Have the student decide the author’s purpose by comparing the passage to examples on the “Author’s Purpose Guide.” Then have
the student write his/her answer at the bottom of the page.
Now read three more passages and think about why the author wrote each one. Then write the author’s purpose.
Give the student a copy of “Author’s Purpose Guide,” Student Page 1; and “Guess My Purpose,” Student Page 5. (Step 3)
Monitor the student's progress and remind him/her to think about the kind of details the author includes and the words the author
uses. Have the student decide the author’s purpose and write it in the second column.
The student should refer to the “Author’s Purpose Guide,” Student Page 1, as needed.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets needed to complete the lesson
ANSWERS
Decide the Purpose:
2. to eat better at lunch and supper.
to cut back on meals that
are high in salt and fat.
to eat more fruits and
vegetables.
3. to stop buying junk food.
to get stores to sell more
healthful foods.
4. to eat better and get
healthy.
to buy meals that are good for them.
to choose healthful snacks.
to help make America healthy.
5. to persuade readers to stop
buying junk food and start
eating healthful foods
Step 4: Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate understanding of
this lesson before moving forward.
Start Video- Choose the book the student would like, have them watch the video, then discuss the Author’s purpose.

Subject
Writing
Title
Descriptive Prompt
Lesson Objective
To write a descriptive piece that paints a picture in the reader's mind.
Background Information for Teacher
N/A
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Writing paper
Pencil
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Pre-write (plan).
Give the student a few minutes to make a list of as many of their favorite places as they can. Let the student share their lists. Ask the
student to choose one place about which to write. Using a graphic organizer, have the student write words that describe their favorite
place.
Write (compose).
From their graphic organizers, have the student compose a draft describing their favorite place.
Revise (improve).
Give time for the student to read and discuss improvements to their papers. Give the student time to improve their drafts by adding,
deleting, or reordering ideas based on feedback.
Edit (proofread).
Help the student check their own papers and make corrections for spelling, grammar, punctuation, and capitalization. Have the
student make a final copy.
Publish (share).
Choose a format for the student to share their papers with others.
Writing Prompt:
Everyone has favorite places where they feel happy. Choose one favorite place and describe what that place is like, using as many
senses as you can. Use rich, descriptive words so your reader can imagine being in your special place.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheet for extra practice
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
All the Places to Love, Patricia McLachlan (online video, offline activity)
Have the student watch the video of the story “All the Places to Love” have them retell portions of the story using descriptive details.

Subject
Spelling
Title
Spelling List 1
Lesson Objective
Sight words, short a/e words,
Background Information for Teacher
This spelling list is designed for spelling practice for one week.
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Pencil
Paper
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Sight words, short a/e words, and academic vocabulary
1. high
2. every
3. near
4.west
5.dress
6. best
7. next
8. else
9. checked
10.grand
11.stand
12.am
13.matter
14.forms
15.value
16.area
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Practice Sheet
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Play hangman using 3-5 words every day for one week. (offline) activity

Subject
Math
Title
Lemonade Sale
Lesson Objective
The student will construct his/her own graphs based on data they collect from the book Lemonade For Sale.
Background Information for Teacher
The student should be involved in collecting and describing data. The student will construct his/her own graphs based on data they
collected from reading Lemonade For Sale.
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Lemonade for Sale (this story is in video format in Step 1, you can find this book at your local library to read along)
.
Rubric for Graphs
Lemonade for Sale Summary
Crayons
Pocket chart
Lemonade Graph
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Have ever had a “lemonade stand” or sold Kool-Aid in their front yard?
Today we just watched a video about children who want to earn money. Let’s review and this time keep track of how much lemonade
they sell in your journal. Let’s find out what happens.
Have the student glue the Rubric for Graphs (Step 3)
onto inside cover of their journal.
How much lemonade do you think the children will sell?
Will they sell the same amount every day of the week?
Is there a day that might be better than another day of the week?
Why do you think?
Pass out the Lemonade Graph. (Step 3)
Have the student follow along and create the graph in student journals as the teacher the Lemonade for Sale Summary. (Step 3)
Use the Rubrics for Graphs to complete the graph (Step 3)
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets needed to complete the lesson
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Reading a Bar Graph (Offline) worksheet

Subject
Science
Title
Here Comes the Sun
Lesson Objective
This activity will have students predict, measure and record temperatures.
Background Information for Teacher
N/A
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Three yellow poster boards
Pocket Temperatures
Strip thermometers
Construction paper (red, black, white, blue)
Ruler
Scissors
Glue stick
Large Pringles
Black construction paper
Aluminum foil
Hammer
Nail
Wire hanger
Bricks or blocks of wood
Hot dogs
Hot dog buns and condiments
Song: “Here Comes the Sun”, Beatles

Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Begin the lesson by playing the Beatles song, “Here Comes the Sun”.
Introduce the unit by having the student brainstorm as many words or phrases that have the word sun in them. (e.g., sunbeam,
Sunday, sundae, suntan, sunburn, sunscreen, Sun Chips, sunlight, sunstroke, Sun Bear, etc.)
Have three paper suns cut out of yellow paper.
The three suns will be the KWL chart. In the first sun write down all of the things the student knows about the sun. In the second sun
write down what the student wants to learn. At the end of the unit write down what the student learned in the third sun. Hang the suns
in the room and add to them as needed.
Next, pass out construction paper, scissors, glue, and rulers to make temperature pockets.
Instruct the student to measure two 6” x 6” inch squares of each color. Glue three sides together to form a pocket.
Review how to read a thermometer.
The student will place strip thermometers inside the pockets and place all four pockets outside in the sun for the first part of the
experiment.
The student will predict what they think the temperatures will be for each color of pocket.
Check the pockets periodically for morning temperatures and for afternoon temperatures.
Record temperatures. *Variations may include placing the pockets in a shaded area and check for temperatures during the following
day.

Journal the results and compare. Have the student journal the steps used to experiment with the pockets and thermometers. (Draw
pictures) Did the color of the paper make a difference in the heat recorded? Where was the pocket placed directly in the sun, in a
shaded area? Consider questions such as: Which color of paper do you think will heat up the most? And why the student thinks there
is a difference in the temperature.
Hot Dog Cooker
The student will need one large can that still has the lid on it. (example: a Pringles can)
Place a small nail hole in the middle of the lid and the bottom of the can.
Place the black construction paper around the outside of the can with scotch tape.
Straighten a wire hanger.
Place the hanger through the holes of the can with about four inches hanging from each end.
The cooker is now ready to be used the next day.
Place the hotdog on the straightened hanger and push the hotdog to the middle of the hanger, push the wire hanger through the
bottom of the can, place tin foil over the opening, and replace the cover of the can.
Outside (or in a window in the classroom) place the two ends of the cooker on the bricks/blocks of wood and cook.
Take one of the hotdogs out of the can to check temperature. Eat and enjoy.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets needed to complete the lesson
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Ice Race (offline) activity
(this activity works best with multiple participants)
Break into partners and give each participant a plastic resealable bag and one ice cube. Then have the participants race each other to see
who can melt the ice cube first. Encourage the participants to be creative in the way they add heat to their ice cubes. Students may use
friction to help speed the melting, blow hot air on them, or put the bags in a sunny spot in the room. The first person whose ice cubes melt
should raise their hands. You may wish to use a stopwatch and take the opportunity to discuss elapsed time as a math extension.

Subject
Social Studies
Title
Reduce, Reuse, Recycle
Lesson Objective
Students will understand that the only way we will be able to continue on the earth the way we are now is to reduce, reuse, and
recycle. They will generate ideas to limit usage of natural resources in all areas.
Background Information for Teacher
N/A
Student Prior Knowledge
Student should bring at least one item that can be recycled.
Materials:
One item that can be recycled
An article from a magazine, newspaper, or the internet that discusses recycling, reducing, or reusing.
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Teacher takes a pre-filled garbage bag and scatters the clean trash around the room, making loud noises and generally being
obnoxious. Then, ask the student "What am I doing?" Let the student share ideas and then ask, "What should we do now? Put the
items back in the trash, or is there anything else that we could use these items for?" This is the pre-assessment portion of the lesson
- find out if the student can think of any other ways to use items other than throwing them away.
Ask the student to pick up two items and put them on their desk, adding these items to what they have brought to the lesson, and
then give the student some think time to determine what they think the best use of the items is.
Read some of the articles about what real people do with recyclable products, and then discuss and decide, what could be done with
the products on the student’s desk?
Next, discuss the fact that recycling paper and aluminum cans is fairly simple and necessary. However, nearly everything could be
recycled or reused. In addition, the most important thing is to reduce the amount of materials we use in the first place. Tell the
student their assignment is to think of ways to reduce the amount of material used, and to imagine real reuses for the items on their
desk.
Ask what will happen if people DON'T recycle or reuse? How will the earth be affected if we choose to NOT reduce, reuse, and
recycle? There will be absolute consequences. Make a list of possible outcomes for inaction.
Finally, now that the student is thinking about reducing, reusing, and recycling, ask them what would happen if every person in this
comuunity decided to act more responsibly towards using natural resources? What are some things that our community could do to
use natural resources (other than paper and cans) better? Brainstorm several ideas and discuss pros and cons using a T chart.
Then, choose the one idea that is most feasible and easiest to implement and ask the student how they want to advertise this idea to
the community.
Let the student create posters etc. about their plan and post them throughout the community. Determine an appropriate period for the
duration of the project. The teacher has the responsibility to manage the project and take care of getting the required permissions.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets, Games & answer keys:
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Make a Pencil Holder (offline) activity located in Step 3.
Submit a picture of your pencil holder and *earn $5 FunBucks.
FunBucks are only available to FunCation Academy members

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