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FunCation Academy’s 2nd Grade Lesson Plan Sampler
Thank you for trying our Lesson Plan Sampler! Here are a few
quick tips before you begin.
1. This Lesson Plan Sampler contains six (6) 1st grade lessons, Reading, Writing, Spelling, Math, Science, and
Social Studies.
2. Please read through the complete lesson before you begin teaching. (Some lessons require a little prep work
before you can teach).
3. Each lesson includes additional resources, such as an instructional/introduction video, worksheets, and
activities and/or games to enhance the lesson.

 

2nd

Disclaimer
FunCation Academy is not the original author of any lesson plans. We compiled and modified free online lesson
plans and free additional third-party resources to create homeschool friendly easy-to-use lesson plans. You do
not have to become a member to use our lesson plans, we share 3 lesson plans every month via our newsletter.
Subject
Reading
Title
Read Words with aw, au,all, ald,alk, alt
Lesson Objective
Phonics: Phonograms, all, alk, alt, ald
Background Information for Teacher
Words in bold are said aloud by the teacher.
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Print and cut apart Phonogram Header Word Cards and Phonogram Word Cards
Print a copy of the Build it and Write it page
Individual letter cards (optional)
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Read Words with Phonogram patterns au, all, alk, alt, ald
Phonemic Awareness: Listen to this sound. /au/. Say the sound.
If you hear the /au/ sound in the words I say, show thumbs up.
Ready? Say the following words aloud and have the student to repeat the word. After I say the word, you say it. Then I will ask
for the signal. If the /au/ sound is in the word, show thumbs up. The student will respond by putting thumbs up when they hear
the /au/ sound: hall, draw, fraud, fold, aunt, tight, brave, jaw, because, law.
Look at this group of letters. Write ...all... on the board or use letter cards to spell the pattern. ALL is read /all/. Read it with me. If
I put the letter m at the beginning of /all/, I make the word mall. I go to the mall to shop. Mall. What’s the word?
Look at this group of letters. Write ...alk... on the board or use letter cards to spell the pattern. Alk is read /auk/. Read it with me.
If I put the letter t at the beginning of /auk/, I make the word talk. I talk on the phone. Talk. What is this word?
Look at this group of letters. Write ...alt... on the board or use letter cards to spell the pattern. Alt is read /alt/. If I put the letter h
at the beginning of /alt/, I make the word halt. Halt means to come to a stop. Halt. What is this word?
Look at this group of letters. Write ...ald... on the board or use letter cards to spell the pattern. ALD is read /ald/. Read it with me.
If I put the letter b at the beginning of /ald/, I make the word bald. The man’s head is bald. Bald. What is this word?
Read the words I made: mall, talk, halt, bald
Look at these words. What do you notice? How are these words alike?
When the letters ...a... and ...l... are side by side and followed by a consonant, the letter a usually says /au/.
Now we will practice reading words with these patterns. Place the word cards mall, talk, halt, and bald in a pocket chart or on the
table.
You will pick a card, read the word and place it under the word that has the same pattern.
Show the student the stack of word cards.
The student picks a card and reads it. Affirm correct response or provide corrective feedback. Continue until all the word cards have
been read and correctly placed under the appropriate column.
Have the student cut letter cards apart from the top of the Build it and Write it page.
I will say a word. You repeat the word. Spell the word using the letter cards. Then write the word on the lines below. Words
to spell and write: wall, stall, salt, palm, calm, stalk, small, wallet, Walter, hallway
Note and chart progress for the student.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets needed to complete the lesson
Step 4: Review for the next day. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can
demonstrate understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Bingo! Use the Phonogram Word Cards
from Step 3 as the student’s bingo card. Create a word list, which includes the words on
their bingo card.

Subject
Writing
Title
All-About-Me Story
Lesson Objective
Students will create a personal narrative by generating ideas for writing from their personal experiences, write details of their
experience in an organized manner, and revise their draft to add details.
Background Information for Teacher
This lesson is designed to be taught over three (3) days.
Student Prior Knowledge
Stories have a beginning, a middle, and an end. They need a basic understanding of what details are - the 5 W's - what, who, why,
when, where. Good understanding of end punctuation, capital letter usage, and grade level spelling.
Materials:
1. An All-About-Me Story Planning Sheet (pdf)
2. All-About-Me Story First Draft Sheet (pdf)
3. All-About-Me Story Final Draft Form (pdf)
4. Blue pen (Revision Pen)
5. Red pen (Checking Pen)
6. Clipboard (optional)
7. Chart paper
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Day One
1. Teacher will model how to use the All-About-Me Planning Sheet by working through it in front of the student.
2. Begin by telling about three incidents that have occurred in your own life.
3. Choose one of the story ideas you would like to write about.
4. Tell your story orally to your students. Ask them, "Could I write this story down?"
5. Model how you could take the oral story and put it into a written personal narrative.
Start the story with a bang - writing an exciting first sentence to draw the reader in.
Model how you would tell the details of your story in an organized format. Be sure to include the
beginning, middle, and end.
Purposely you may want to leave some important details out so you can model how the student can
ask questions to generate more of the story details.
Encourage the student to ask you questions about the story - to help you get the important missing
details.
Model writing the story in front of your student on chart paper.
6. Pass out the An All-About-Me Story planning sheet to the student.
7. Have the student list two or three things that have happened to them and write them on their planning sheet.
8. Have the student pick one idea from their list to write their personal narrative about.
9. Have them tell the complete story of the incident.
10.Encourage the student to list a lot of details telling what happened. Ask many questions to get as many
important details as possible. (Remind them of when you were telling your story.)
11.Remind them of your exciting first sentence and have them try writing an exciting first sentence for their story.
12.Now have them copy that exciting first sentence on All-About-Me first draft page.
13.Have them write their story. Remind them to include all the wonderful details.
Day Two
Revise
1. Referring to the planning sheet section 3, the student now revise their first draft. Teacher uses her modeled
story and a blue marker (Revision Pen), to go back through and add details that may have been missing in the
first draft.
2. Have the student take their first draft copy of their All-About-Me story, a clipboard, and the blue pen (Revision
Pen).
3. The student will read their first draft and then add any missing details. The students ask self - Did I forget
anything? Do I need to add any details to make my story better?
4. Add details to make the story more interesting or clear.
5. Reread their revised story.
Day Three
1. Teacher models how to take the revised first draft and use her red pen (Checking Pen) to check for errors.
Check for and correct end punctuation, capital letters, and spelling.
2. Teacher then models how to add a title and then how to write a neat final copy on All-About-Me final draft form.
3. Have the student take their revised first draft and their red pen (Checking Pen) and make corrections for end
punctuation, capital letters, and spelling.
4. Have them copy their corrected first draft neatly on their final draft form.
5. The student then can add the title.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets needed to complete the lesson
Step 4: Review for the next day. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can
demonstrate understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Have the student illustrate their All-About-Me story.

Submit your illustrated story and *earn $5 FunBucks

 

FunBucks are only available for FunCation Academy members

Subject
Spelling
Title
Spelling List 1
Lesson Objective
Students will learn sight words, short a/e words, and academic vocabulary.
Background Information for Teacher
N/A
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Paper
Pencil
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Here are the spelling words for this week.
1. high
2. every
3. near
4. west
5. dress
6. best
7. next
8. else
9. checked
10. grand
11. stand
12. am
13. matter
14. forms
15. value
16. area
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Practice Worksheet
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Play Hangman with the student using 3-5 words every day for one week. (offline) activity

Subject
Math
Title
Feed the Gator
Lesson Objective
Students will be able to successfully identify greater than, less than, and equal to in sets of numbers.
Background Information for Teacher
N/A
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Index cards (each card should have a three digit number on it)
Alligator set -please print

Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Ask the student if they know/remember what the words greater than, less than, and equal to mean. Give the following examples to
check for understanding: (Write each problem and solution on the board).
Is 50 greater than or less than 75?
Is 92 less than or greater than 22?
Is 453 less than, equal to or greater than 453?
Is 679 less than, equal to, or greater than 758?
Point to the symbols on the board (the answers). Tell the student that the symbol for less than or greater than looks like an alligator
ready to eat the bigger number. Alligators love to eat the biggest thing available. When the numbers are equal the equal sign is used,
meaning the alligator does not want either number or is confused about which to eat.
Have a stack of index cards with three digit numbers ready for the student. Give the student at least 10 cards. Tell the student to lay
out a pair on their desk and place the correct alligator between them (see attached). Check the student before doing the next set. Tell
the student that they are going to try a few more on their own.
The last few problems will be displayed one by one on the board. Choose a random set of three digit numbers and write them on the
board. Have the student hold up the correct alligator to solve the problem. Repeat for as many numbers as necessary to make sure
the student understand.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets for extra practice with answer key
Step 4: Review. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can demonstrate
understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Comparing numbers (online) activity

Subject
Science
Title
Rock Hounds
Lesson Objective
After reading Byrd Baylor's book "Everybody Needs a Rock" (Step 1), the student will select a rock, study it, and describe its
attributes.
Background Information for Teacher
N/A
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Everybody Needs a Rock
by Byrd Baylor ( Step 1)
colored sand and glue
assorted rocks
classifying grid
hand lenses
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Ask the student, “What is sand?”
1. Look at sand with hand lenses. Help the student discover that sand is a lot of itty-bitty rocks.
2. Discuss some of the rock attributes presented (e.g., size, color, shape, and texture) in Everybody Needs a Rock.
3. Select a rock and study it. Have the student help describe it. Introduce and discuss other rock attributes such as hardness,
patterns, crystals, etc. Complete the description of the rock.
4. Have the student select another rock, and then describe and classify their rock. Write down the descriptions.
5. You can repeat until the student has had the opportunity to study each rock.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Worksheets needed to complete the lesson
Step 4: Review for the next day. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can
demonstrate understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Classifying Game (offline). Use the Worksheet from Step 3 and have the student search the house to find items that match the
descriptions in each box.

Subject
Social Studies
Title
Me On the Map
Lesson Objective
After reading Joan Sweeney's book "Me On the Map", the student will create a map of their bedroom and of their house.
Background Information for Teacher
The student should have a basic background on the purpose of maps.
Student Prior Knowledge
N/A
Materials:
Me On the Map
by Joan Sweeney (Step 1)
paper
pencils and crayons
Step-by-Step Guided Lesson
Step 1: Start Video
(Tips: Interact with the video by pausing, to ask questions or discuss information viewed with student.)
Step 2: Teach Lesson
Ask: “What are maps used for? Where have you seen maps?”
1. Read Me On the Map
. As you read/watch this story, ask questions to relate the importance of the book to the student.
2. Emphasize that the book starts with a room and eventually covers a wider view of maps. Compare this to a bird. A bird can
see a lot more than a person can. Maps can be used to locate information in a small area or a large area.
3. Show the student a community map.
4. Pass out a piece of blank paper.
5. Tell the student to lightly sketch with a pencil a map of their bedroom. Have the student draw a key in the corner with
symbols of the most important things in their bedroom. Emphasize that this is what their bedroom mostly looks like, and
that the only information needed on the map is the important areas of their room. For example, the student doesn’t need to
draw his dirty sock on the floor.
6. Provide another piece of blank paper.
7. Have the student draw a map of their house. As they draw their house, ask them if someone new in their house would be
able to use this map to locate important information.
Step 3: Complete the worksheet attached below.
Extra Practice Worksheet- Challenge
Step 4: Review for the next day. Start the next lesson with the game or activity attached below for review so the student can
demonstrate understanding of this lesson before moving forward.
Royal Castle Floor Plan

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